Jazz club – Jazz Fin http://jazzfin.com/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 03:50:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jazzfin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-14-150x150.png Jazz club – Jazz Fin http://jazzfin.com/ 32 32 Jeff Goldblum performing a Kenny Loggins medley in a jazz club is the video you didn’t know you needed https://jazzfin.com/jeff-goldblum-performing-a-kenny-loggins-medley-in-a-jazz-club-is-the-video-you-didnt-know-you-needed/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 13:32:06 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/jeff-goldblum-performing-a-kenny-loggins-medley-in-a-jazz-club-is-the-video-you-didnt-know-you-needed/ Kevin Winter/Getty Images Celebrities! They are like us! If there’s one thing that unites the human race, it’s that we all love to do karaoke. But if you’re rich and famous, you can hire a jazz combo to accompany you as you smash together some of your favorite songs from when you were a struggling […]]]>

Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Celebrities! They are like us! If there’s one thing that unites the human race, it’s that we all love to do karaoke. But if you’re rich and famous, you can hire a jazz combo to accompany you as you smash together some of your favorite songs from when you were a struggling young actor making your screen debut on Ray Bradbury presents. As Jeff Goldblum did, with Variety sharing, via their Twitter account, a video of former Dr. Ian Malcolm with his backing band the Mildred Snitzer Orchestra laughing through “Footloose” and “Highway to the Danger Zone” instead of Los Angeles Sun Rose.

Goldblum has performed with the Mildred Snitzer Orchestra for years, having established himself with a residency at the Dresden Jazz Lounge in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles. He also took his act on the road to clubs and concert halls across the country and shares the festival. stages with disparate musical acts like Hurray for the Riff Raff and Neil Young.

The act consists of a bop band supporting Goldblum as he noodles on the piano, and bounces around the stage singing and kibitzing with the crowd. Although obviously the draw is the star of Gen X movies like jurassic park and independence daythe band is a tight combo of seasoned pros, and Goldblum’s playful joy of performing in front of a live crowd makes for a lively evening of entertainment.

Although there doesn’t appear to be any more Goldblum shows on the horizon, according to the live music fan site BrooklynVegan the band spent late 2021 and early 2022 visiting concert halls in select cities. More importantly, Goldblum keeps it… Free from all ties.

]]>
The Smoke Jazz Club will reopen in July after a two-year hiatus https://jazzfin.com/the-smoke-jazz-club-will-reopen-in-july-after-a-two-year-hiatus/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 17:55:10 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/the-smoke-jazz-club-will-reopen-in-july-after-a-two-year-hiatus/ On March 15, 2020, just before the city was locked down by a pandemic, bassist Ron Carter and drummer Al Foster took the stage at the Smoke Jazz Club on the Upper West Side. The men, both over 70, were playing to a packed house in the intimate room. “We were holding our breath hoping […]]]>

On March 15, 2020, just before the city was locked down by a pandemic, bassist Ron Carter and drummer Al Foster took the stage at the Smoke Jazz Club on the Upper West Side. The men, both over 70, were playing to a packed house in the intimate room.

“We were holding our breath hoping to get through the weekend,” said Paul Stache, co-owner of the club with his wife, Molly Sparrow Johnson. Luckily they finished the weekend without anyone getting sick, but by then it was clear that Covid-19 was an imminent threat. That Sunday, Stache and Johnson sat down and made a tough decision.

“We looked at each other and saw the size of the room and said, ‘You know, this doesn’t seem safe anymore’ and decided that night to shut it down,” Stache said. “At the time we thought it would be a few weeks, but of course it turned out to be very different.”

That day was the last time that musicians played in front of an audience inside the club. Like countless other venues, Smoke quickly turned to live-streamed performances, alfresco dining in glass greenhouses, and a revamped storefront for sidewalk concerts.

Stache and Johnson had long considered renovating the space, but Covid made it a necessity. Now, after more than two years, the newly refurbished club is reopening with a four-day celebration from Thursday July 21 to Sunday July 24.

]]>
Smoke Jazz Club Announces Summer-Fall Lineup Featuring Vijay Iyer, Al Foster, Mary Stallings and More https://jazzfin.com/smoke-jazz-club-announces-summer-fall-lineup-featuring-vijay-iyer-al-foster-mary-stallings-and-more/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 19:05:28 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/smoke-jazz-club-announces-summer-fall-lineup-featuring-vijay-iyer-al-foster-mary-stallings-and-more/ After two years of reorienting itself in the face of the pandemic with modified operations including live streams, sidewalk concerts and al fresco dining, Smoke Jazz Club is making a memorable return as a world-renowned destination for the best classical and modern jazz. Acclaimed for its essential music programming and inspired setting, this revered institution […]]]>

After two years of reorienting itself in the face of the pandemic with modified operations including live streams, sidewalk concerts and al fresco dining, Smoke Jazz Club is making a memorable return as a world-renowned destination for the best classical and modern jazz. Acclaimed for its essential music programming and inspired setting, this revered institution has embarked on an impressive expansion and renovation that is preparing the venerable club for the post-pandemic 21st century.

Located on Manhattan’s Upper West Side at the junction of Broadway and 106th Street (aka Duke Ellington Boulevard), the Smoke Jazz Club is one of New York’s premier live music venues. Renowned for delivering top-notch programming of accessible and timeless jazz featuring legendary performers, modern masters and rising stars, Smoke is distinguished by its candlelit dining room, stellar acoustics and classic American cuisine. Founded in 1999, SMOKE also owns a GRAMMY-nominated label, Smoke Sessions Records, and a popular streaming concert series, Smoke Screens. For everything else, go SMOKEjazz.com.

UPCOMING CONCERT SCHEDULE (subject to change):
All times from Game to Sun at 7:00 p.m. + 9:00 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. additional (Friday and Saturday only)
All in-person tickets $40-$60 | Live stream $10

Thu-Sun 7.21-24 Smoke Reopening Celebration: George Coleman Quartet and special guest Peter Bernstein

George Coleman – tenor saxophone
Peter Bernstein – guitar
Davis Whitfield – piano
Peter Washington – bass
Joe Farnsworth – drums

Bobby Watson – Alto saxophone
Orrin Evans – piano
Curtis Lundy – bass
Victor Jones – drums

Thu-Sun 8.04-7 Louis Hayes & The Cannonball Legacy Band

Jeremy Pelt – trumpet
Vincent Herring – alto saxophone
Rick Germanson – piano
Dezron Douglas – bass
Louis Hayes – drums

Mary Stalling – voice
Emmet Cohen – piano
Russell Hall – bass
Joe Farnsworth – drums

Thu-Sun 8.18-21 The Big Hitters

Jeremy Pelt – trumpet
Eric Alexander – tenor saxophone
Mike LeDonne – piano
Peter Washington – bass
Kenny Washington – bass

Thu-Sun 8.25-28 Rudresh Mahanthappa Trio: Charlie Parker Party

Rudresh Mahanthappa – alto saxophone
Harish Raghavan – bass
Rudy Royston – drums

Thu-Sun 9.01-4 Al Foster Quintet: Smoke Sessions cd release

Chris Potter – tenor saxophone
TBA – special guest trumpet
Kevin Hays – piano
Vincent Archer – bass
Al Foster – drums

Thu-Sun 9.08-11 Eddie Henderson Quintet

Eddie Henderson – trumpet
Donald Harrison – alto saxophone
George Cables – piano
Essiet Essiet – bass
Lenny White – drums

Thu-Sun 9.15-18 Vijay Iyer Trio

Vijay Iyer – piano
Harish Raghavan – bass
Tyshawn Sorey – drums

Thu-Sun 9.22-25 One For All

Jim Rotondi – trumpet
Eric Alexander – tenor saxophone
Steve Davis – trombone
David Hazeltine – piano
Peter Washington – bass
Joe Farnsworth – drums

]]>
Reopening of the Smoke Jazz Club in an expanded space https://jazzfin.com/reopening-of-the-smoke-jazz-club-in-an-expanded-space/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 16:43:31 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/reopening-of-the-smoke-jazz-club-in-an-expanded-space/ Photo by Jimmy Katz After spending two years entertaining jazz fans through live streams and sidewalk concerts, the owners of the Smoke Jazz Club have announced the concert venue’s return to the Upper West Side – in an expanded space. – July 21. “The Smoke Jazz Club has so much history,” says co-owners Paul Stache […]]]>

Photo by Jimmy Katz

After spending two years entertaining jazz fans through live streams and sidewalk concerts, the owners of the Smoke Jazz Club have announced the concert venue’s return to the Upper West Side – in an expanded space. – July 21.

“The Smoke Jazz Club has so much history,” says co-owners Paul Stache and Molly Sparrow Johnson, husband and wife. “Despite the struggles of the past few years, we just knew the music couldn’t stop there. The last two years have not been easy for anyone, but having live music in the club again with everyone together, musicians and listeners, seems like a turning point. We are very excited to take this next step.

Stache and Johnson had agreed to take over the two adjacent storefronts before the pandemic began, but once he did, this expansion became a “necessity to operate safely,” Johnson says.

The addition of these smaller combo spaces will serve as an adjoining lounge with the relocated full-length bar, providing more space for the audience and a larger stage for performers in the main listening room.

READ MORE: A ‘Beauty and the Beast’ themed cocktail experience

NEA jazz master George Coleman will return to christen the new and improved Smoke with a grand four-night reopening concert July 21-24. Other artists slated to perform in the near future include Charles McPherson, Vijay Iyer, Mary Stallings, Bill Charlap, Bobby Watson, Nicholas Payton, Renee Rosnes, Rudresh Mahanthappa, Cyrus Chestnut, Buster Williams, and more. Grand Opening Ceremony tickets range from $40 to $60 and will be available starting June 6.

Founded in 1999, SMOKE also owns a GRAMMY-nominated label, Smoke Sessions Records, and a popular streaming concert series, Smoke Screens.

The Smoke Jazz Club is located at 2751 Broadway, between 105th and 106th streets. Learn more about smokejazz.com.

Sharing is caring!

]]>
NYC’s Smoke Jazz Club finally reopens next month https://jazzfin.com/nycs-smoke-jazz-club-finally-reopens-next-month/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/nycs-smoke-jazz-club-finally-reopens-next-month/ After a two-year closure caused by the pandemic, the Upper West Side’s iconic Smoke Jazz Club at 2751 Broadway by 106th Street officially reopens in July – and the beloved venue looks slightly different (in a good way). way!). Photography: Michael Black Husband-and-wife co-owners Paul Stache and Molly Sparrow Johnson actually took two adjoining storefronts […]]]>

After a two-year closure caused by the pandemic, the Upper West Side’s iconic Smoke Jazz Club at 2751 Broadway by 106th Street officially reopens in July – and the beloved venue looks slightly different (in a good way). way!).

Photography: Michael Black

Husband-and-wife co-owners Paul Stache and Molly Sparrow Johnson actually took two adjoining storefronts (a move that was made before the pandemic) in order to expand the jazz club, which now also houses an adjoining lounge. The instantly recognizable full bar that patrons used to sit at in the venue’s original iteration now sits in the new lounge. The extra space also allows for a larger stage.

“The Smoke Jazz Club has so much history,” the co-owners said in an official statement regarding the reopening. “Despite the difficulties of the past few years, we just knew the music couldn’t stop there. The past two years have not been easy for anyone, but having live music in the club again with everyone together, musicians and listeners, seems like a turning point. We are very excited to take this next step.

Since the club opened on April 9, 1999, the owners are no strangers to the kinds of disasters that deeply affect a business. Some may even argue that their ability to survive the 9/11 attacks, various economic crashes, fires and the like contributed to how they handled the COVID-19 pandemic.

Smoke Jazz Club
Photography: Jimmy Katz

In keeping with the country’s new laws, Stache and Johnson effectively pivoted their original business model – for a time, no longer relying on in-person jazz sessions – to include a streaming concert series, shows on sidewalks, outdoor dining and more.

On July 21, however, things sort of return to normal with a grand reopening celebration featuring the George Coleman Quartet and special guest Peter Bernstein. Upcoming lineup also includes the Heavy Hitters, the Eddie Henderson Quintet, Mary Stallings and more.

You can view the summer schedule and buy tickets for each session on the right here.

Smoke Jazz Club
Photograph: Courtesy of Smoke Jazz Club

As exciting as any local music-related business is, there’s something about a jazz club that opened in the late ’90s and has hosted Chris Potter, Eric Alexander, Jimmy Cobb and Brad Mehldau over the years. years that deserves special mention. a kind of respect, especially after the few years we’ve all been through and the kind of experiences we’ve temporarily had to give up until now.

Go ahead, New Yorkers, and enjoy live music in a historic setting.

]]>
Smoke Jazz Club reopens after pandemic hiatus, bigger and better https://jazzfin.com/smoke-jazz-club-reopens-after-pandemic-hiatus-bigger-and-better/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/smoke-jazz-club-reopens-after-pandemic-hiatus-bigger-and-better/ The last time musicians performed for an audience inside the Smoke Jazz Club on Broadway on 106th Street was in mid-March 2020. Kevin Hays was on piano, Ron Carter on bass and Al Foster on drums. “At the time,” says Smoke founder Paul Stache, “it was clear there was a pretty serious virus circling around […]]]>

The last time musicians performed for an audience inside the Smoke Jazz Club on Broadway on 106th Street was in mid-March 2020. Kevin Hays was on piano, Ron Carter on bass and Al Foster on drums. “At the time,” says Smoke founder Paul Stache, “it was clear there was a pretty serious virus circling around the world. And looking at the band – Ron is over 80, Al is almost 80 – we were all holding our breath. But we spent the weekend and luckily no one got sick.

Then New York went into lockdown and places in the city went dark. Every day, as the weeks turned into months, Stache would go check out the club, where Carter’s bass amp and Foster’s drums and cymbals were still on stage. “It was eerily quiet,” he recalled. “And I kept thinking, I wonder if this was the last show we were going to do here?”

Today we can officially perish the thought, as the Smoke Jazz Club announces its grand reopening. The club will host NEA Jazz Master and tenor saxophonist George Coleman with his quartet, as well as guest guitarist Peter Bernstein, from Thursday July 21 to Sunday July 24. (Buy your tickets here.)

Paul Stache and Molly Sparrow Johnson, co-owners of Smoke Jazz & Supper Club, pictured in May 2022.

More than a return to form, the engagement will serve as an unveiling for Smoke’s substantial and long-awaited renovation. One afternoon last week, Stache and Molly Sparrow Johnson — the club’s husband and wife co-owners — sat at a table not far from the stage, which is nearly 40 square feet larger than before. The room itself, with its exposed brick walls and pressed tin ceiling, seemed noticeably more spacious; a long banquette replaced the former bar, which now resides in a separate, adjacent lounge. The number of seats has almost doubled.

“The goal initially was to create a room that was a bit more pandemic-proof,” Stache said. “Where the stage is large enough for a trio or quartet to play without literally being neck and neck, in a room set up so that tables can be divided and capacity reduced, if necessary. With a larger kitchen where our staff can work safely, and a ventilation system that brings in and circulates fresh air.

During my visit, the contractors had their hands full on what is still an active site; most of the surfaces of the future living room were covered with a layer of construction dust. But the improvements to the venue — that larger stage, stand-alone bar, relocated bathroom and kitchen access, vastly expanded kitchen itself — were obvious to someone who was a customer. since the beginning, 23 years ago. That it took the stress test of a pandemic to put these improvements in place is, as they say, just one of those things.

# # #

When Smoke Jazz & Supper Club opened on April 9, 1999, it was seen as a welcome new addition to the New York jazz ecology – but also as a sequel. For more than 20 years, beginning in the mid-1970s, the venue was known as Augie’s Jazz Bar, an adorably scruffy neighborhood eatery. (Bernstein was among the musicians who cut their teeth there.)
Stache, who grew up in Berlin, Germany, stumbled across the place on the first night of a visit to New York in 1992 and never got over it. “Junior Cook and Cecil Payne were here,” he says, “and I can’t think of a more special introduction to New York. The place was packed and there was a thick layer of smoke hanging about eight feet in the middle of the room. The music was just amazing.

He harassed Augie’s namesake owner Augusto Cuartas for any job he could get, starting as a dishwasher and eventually becoming a bartender before moving on. When Augie suddenly closed in 1998, Stache approached the landlord and arranged to pay back the rent by taking over the lease. Smoke has made its mark as a decidedly more grown-up successor to Augie’s, while maintaining the scale of the venue. Its opening act was the George Coleman Quartet, with Harold Mabern.

Smoke Jazz Club

As Stache recalls, Coleman also reopened the club after the World Trade Center attacks of September 11, 2001 — one of the few major disruptive events that Smoke has weathered over the years. Our COVID era is unique for a number of reasons, of course. One being the fact that it happened so abruptly and one-sidedly, at least in New York, and was so choppy and uneven in its recovery.

Like some other top jazz clubs, Smoke turned to video during the pandemic: you might remember the Smoke Screens stream, featuring bands (scrupulously masked, then masked and vaxxed) playing for the cameras in an empty room. Some of them have produced lasting documents; Orrin Evans released an album for affiliate label Smoke Sessions, The magic of today, out of a live concert. Hays became one of his livestreams, featuring bassist Ben Street and drummer Billy Hart, in a Smoke Sessions version called All things are. (I wrote the liner notes.)

For a time in the summer of 2020, Smoke also operated as a sidewalk cafe, with groups settling right inside open windows facing Broadway. Around this time, Stache and Johnson sat down with an architect friend to carefully assess the club’s floor plan and dimensions, in light of the social distancing guidelines that had been issued. “We came to the conclusion that 14 people could be in this room,” Johnson said. “And we just had this moment where we realize it’s not going to work. And I don’t know if it will work again. That’s when it became very clear that these two neighboring spaces should be part of Smoke. There was no other way to survive here in this space otherwise.

These two spaces next door used to be a law firm and a dry cleaner, but both had been vacant for years – long before COVID. Smoke’s landlord had previously welcomed the idea of ​​having Stache and Johnson take over the lease. Now, after a period of pandemic leniency with rent, that expansion finally made some burning sense.

“Over the years in this small space, we always had the idea that maybe we should be bigger – but that was one of the things we sort of dreamed about: maybe it’s a good idea, maybe it’s not,” says Stache. “When the pandemic came, it kind of became a necessity. It wasn’t really a choice anymore.”

###

Jazz clubs have struggled, as have jazz musicians, due to pandemic pressures. Some, like the Jazz Standard at the end of 2020 and 55 Bar last month, have closed for the foreseeable future. Smoke’s return is therefore good news for the New York scene, especially for fans of mainstream modern jazz swing. Its renewed shape represents good news of a different kind.

Portrait of Harold Mabern in Smoke

A portrait of pianist Harold Mabern on a bench at Smoke, in May 2022.

The old Smoke had a few quirks that added character but detracted from a listening experience. A support post, for example, which bisected part of the stage – now located more to the side. The bathroom is no longer next to the stage, which means no one will disturb a bass solo, or a ballad, with the sound of a toilet flushing. The swinging kitchen door, with its banging sound and flood of light, is also a thing of the past.

“I’m really thrilled to have a designated listening room,” says Johnson, “built to spec for optimal sound, with an all-new audio system from Meyer.”

The living room next door is another substantial upgrade. “It will be an inviting way to welcome people,” adds Johnson. “Like, ‘Come in and have a drink while you wait,’ instead of ‘Please stand under the scaffolding while you wait.’ And there’s always been people in the neighborhood who say, “I love your space. I just want to come in and have a drink. And I love that we can do that now; we can accommodate these people. at the end of the day, it’s about welcoming people and making our customers happy.

Getting there took a lot longer than Team Smoke had anticipated. At the height of the pandemic, demolition permits came easily; building permits, not so much. What usually took a few weeks ended up taking four or five months. Thus, the club was stripped down to the posts, unsuitable even for a livestream, and caught in limbo.

“Then somehow the building permit was obtained, and we found ourselves in a situation where all the contractors we had lined up were obviously on other sites,” says Stache. “So we had to start from scratch. And then the steel supply was a problem. So it was a combination of supply chain issues and a municipal bureaucracy that wasn’t really moving.

Now that the reopening is fast approaching, Smoke is preparing to pick up the pace. After Coleman, it will feature the Bobby Watson Quartet (July 28-31); Louis Hayes & The Cannonball Legacy Band (August 4-7); Mary Stallings (August 11-14); and the Mike LeDonne Sextet (August 18-21).

The club’s usual anniversary tribute to Charlie Parker will be led by Rudresh Mahanthappa, with his trio (August 25-28). Next are the Al Foster Quintet, in a celebration of the Smoke Sessions album release (September 1-4); the Eddie Henderson Quintet (September 8-11); the Vijay Iyer Trio (September 15-18); and the collective One For All (September 22-25).

During this recent visit, a framed portrait of Coleman sat on one of the benches at the club. In this room, it functioned as both a respectful celebration of the past and a tantalizing promise for the future.

For more information on the reopening of Smoke, visit his website.

]]>
Pete Letanka Trio play at Steyning Jazz Club https://jazzfin.com/pete-letanka-trio-play-at-steyning-jazz-club/ Tue, 31 May 2022 07:05:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/pete-letanka-trio-play-at-steyning-jazz-club/ Pete Letanka Their new line-up is Pete Letanka, piano; Sam Burgess, bass; and Jon Ormston, drums. Club spokesman Colin Jilks said: “Sam Burgess is a much sought after musician who has been with Ronnie Scott’s House Band for 13 years. Register to our daily newsletter SussexWorld Today “And Jon Ormston’s inventive drumming has made him […]]]>
Pete Letanka

Their new line-up is Pete Letanka, piano; Sam Burgess, bass; and Jon Ormston, drums.

Club spokesman Colin Jilks said: “Sam Burgess is a much sought after musician who has been with Ronnie Scott’s House Band for 13 years.

Register to our daily newsletter SussexWorld Today

“And Jon Ormston’s inventive drumming has made him popular at national and international jazz festivals.

“Pete’s love for the great Oscar Peterson and his South African heritage run deep in his music, which led him to become a winner of the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Piano Competition, winning a scholarship to study with Mark Polishook at the University of Maine, USA.

“He graduated in 1997 with a BA (Hons) First Class, after which he formed the Pete Letanka Trio.

“They quickly took the London jazz scene by storm, performing at Ronnie Scott’s, the Purcell Room and Queen Elizabeth Hall.

“He was signed to Zephyr Records in 2005 which released his debut album Afrostocracy.

“Since then, among other things, he has been involved with the Children’s Music Workshop and has conducted projects for the Royal Opera House and the London Philharmonic Orchestra.

“The press reviews are glowing. The Guardian said: ‘Anyone hearing Pete Letanka for the first time is amazed’ and BBC Radio said: ‘He certainly rocks!’

“Could we ask for more? Previous visits to the Steyning Jazz Club by this exceptional pianist have left us all with wonderful memories.

“Our printed program booklets detailing the bands through December 2022 will be available at this concert, as will our Steyning Jazz Club website.

“The bar service is excellent, offering a wide range of drinks.

“Doors open at 7.15pm, concert starts at 8pm. The Steyning Jazz Club meets at the Steyning Centre, Fletcher’s Croft, Steyning. BN44 3XZ.”

For more information about the Steyning Jazz Club call Colin Jilks on 01903 810395.

]]>
Nancy Pauli: Longtime KW Dixieland Jazz Club manager remembered with a wake in New Orleans https://jazzfin.com/nancy-pauli-longtime-kw-dixieland-jazz-club-manager-remembered-with-a-wake-in-new-orleans/ Sat, 28 May 2022 22:24:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/nancy-pauli-longtime-kw-dixieland-jazz-club-manager-remembered-with-a-wake-in-new-orleans/ The Kitchener-Waterloo Dixieland Jazz Club held a lively New Orleans-style vigil on Saturday in remembrance of its longtime manager, Nancy Pauli. Pauli died in February at the age of 81. “We wanted it to be a huge, carefree New Orleans-style party, which she would have loved,” said Wayne Pauli, Nancy’s husband. Musicians perform at the […]]]>

The Kitchener-Waterloo Dixieland Jazz Club held a lively New Orleans-style vigil on Saturday in remembrance of its longtime manager, Nancy Pauli. Pauli died in February at the age of 81.

“We wanted it to be a huge, carefree New Orleans-style party, which she would have loved,” said Wayne Pauli, Nancy’s husband.

Musicians perform at the Kitchener-Waterloo Dixieland Jazz Club on May 28, 2022. (Dan Lauckner/CTV Kitchener)

Attendees said they remembered Nancy’s cheerful spirit and how she always helped improve the mood of any party.

“A very loving, warm person who loved to have fun. If you really knew her, you loved her,” said Dan Rudow, manager of the Kitchener-Waterloo Dixieland Jazz Club.

Nancy was also a lover of Dixieland jazz music. Her friends said she was often first and last on the dance floor.

“Getting up at nine in the morning for the first event and being the last to go to bed and having people back for after parties and things like that. It’s amazing how much fun she could have,” said Rudow.

Photos of Nancy Pauli are displayed at her wake on May 28, 2022. (CTV Kitchener)

Nancy and Wayne immediately knew they shared a love for the musical genre when they met in 1995. They were married on the stage of a jazz festival three years later.

The couple have spent 25 years traveling to festivals around the world, including at least 15 trips to Nancy’s favorite city of New Orleans.

“We used to dress up in our silly costumes on Friday mornings and go to the parade down Bourbon Street. Nancy still had her mug in hand, with a beer, and we walked down Bourbon Street to the park and partied all day. She loved it,” Wayne Pauli said.

“It’s amazing how much fun she could have,” a friend said of Nancy Pauli. (CTV Kitchener)

“It was his passion in life to listen to this music and hang out with people and just have the music community with these people,” said Mark Pauli, Nancy’s son-in-law.

The couple also ran the KW Dixieland Jazz Club for over two decades. This allowed them to share their love of music with local residents, while attracting new artists every week.

“Most were from Toronto, but we have a trombonist here today from Ottawa. We have musicians from the United States,” said Wayne Pauli.

“She was the biggest jazz fan anyone ever knew. That’s what they did every Saturday afternoon,” Mark Pauli said.

]]>
Sting takes over the famous Blue Note Jazz Club in New York to present Shaggy Doing Sensational Sinatra https://jazzfin.com/sting-takes-over-the-famous-blue-note-jazz-club-in-new-york-to-present-shaggy-doing-sensational-sinatra/ Fri, 27 May 2022 04:17:36 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/sting-takes-over-the-famous-blue-note-jazz-club-in-new-york-to-present-shaggy-doing-sensational-sinatra/ House Music Sting takes over the famous Blue Note jazz club in New York to present… There are still great musical evenings in New York. Last night, Sting, one of the biggest rock stars on the planet, took over the famous Blue Note jazz club in Greenwich Village. The […]]]>



House Music Sting takes over the famous Blue Note jazz club in New York to present…


There are still great musical evenings in New York.

Last night, Sting, one of the biggest rock stars on the planet, took over the famous Blue Note jazz club in Greenwich Village. The opportunity? Featuring reggae star pal Shaggy, singing Frank Sinatra songs with a jazz-reggae beat and rich, brassy horns that would bring Memphis musicians to tears.

Sting produced an album he just released: “Com Fly Wid Mi” by Shaggy. While on a break from touring in Oslo, Sting heard Shaggy lazily sing along to a Frank Sinatra CD and had the idea to produce an entire album. It sounds crazy, but it works. As Sting told the packed Blue Note crowd last night: “He has the same voice as Sinatra, a tenor baritone, same range as Sinatra. And I had an idea, of the kind where a neon lights up above your head, Shaggy Sings the Sinatra Songbook produced by yours truly.

Some of the album was produced in Jamaica and Miami, but much of it was made at Capitol Studios in Los Angeles, where Sinatra recorded many of his greatest records.

“When you hear this thing, you’ll smile. Shaggy is in his own reggae ecosystem,” Sting said.

And the truth is that Sting is right. Shaggy’s vocals – which most people know from “It Wasn’t Me” – fit these songs perfectly. Plus, Sting’s production wobbles, with those great horns and cards, and a reggae beat reminiscent of The Police accentuated and fleshed out. As Shaggy noted on stage, “Most reggae only has two chords, but these records have at least five.”

He added: “This album was born out of boredom [during the pandemic]. We hate boredom.

On the album and live on stage, Sting – expected to produce more albums for himself and others – gives the singer a place to shine while maintaining his natural rhythms. Thus, on standards ranging from “Witchcraft” to the single “That’s Life” via “”Luck Be a Lady Tonight”, Shaggy brings a whole new dimension to his career. Not all the songs that Sting has chosen are My favorite last night was Shaggy’s rendition of “Angel Eyes”, a deep track from the Sinatra catalog of his famous 1958 album, “Sinatra Sings for Only the Lonely”.

About halfway through the set, Sting was persuaded to take the stage and sing background vocals with Shaggy on “You Make Me Feel So Young”. They even included some cute designs resembling Rat Pack who appeared as Frank and Dean Martin at the Sands around 1960.

The crowd, which included many radio people, Sirius executives, Sting’s shrewd wife, Trudie Styler, and three of his six children. was quite impressed. I think Shaggy was too. He said, “I never expected to do that.” He added: Reggae, you just don’t hear it. You feel it. I’m happy to push the boundaries of reggae.

Pour yourself some gin and tonic. Sit on the desk and the sunset, and listen

Author

Roger Friedman started his Showbiz411 column in April 2009 after 10 years at Fox News, where he created the Fox411 column. His film reviews are carried by Rotten Tomatoes and he is a member of the film and television branches of the Critics Choice Awards. His articles have appeared in dozens of publications over the years, including New York Magazine, where he wrote the Intelligencer column in the mid-90s and covered the OJ Simpson trial, and Fox News (when it wasn’t). not so crazy) where he covered Michael Jackson. . He is also screenwriter and co-producer of “Only the Strong Survive”, a selection from the Cannes, Sundance and Telluride festivals, directed by DA Pennebaker and Chris Hegedus.

]]>
Last call at 55 Bar as West Village jazz club closes https://jazzfin.com/last-call-at-55-bar-as-west-village-jazz-club-closes/ Tue, 24 May 2022 20:59:58 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/last-call-at-55-bar-as-west-village-jazz-club-closes/ There were only a few working Christmas tree lights hanging on the walls of the 55 bar In Monday. But on the last night the West Village club opened, the room shone. More than a hundred musicians and bar-goers from across the city gathered inside the underground venue to say goodbye to the grimy jazz […]]]>

There were only a few working Christmas tree lights hanging on the walls of the 55 bar In Monday. But on the last night the West Village club opened, the room shone.

More than a hundred musicians and bar-goers from across the city gathered inside the underground venue to say goodbye to the grimy jazz club that up-and-coming artists and Grammy winners have called their home. musical house – and where David Bowie once sat in the audience, researching the band he would use on his latest album, ‘Blackstar’.

“It’s surreal. We still haven’t understood the fact that we’re going to lose one of the most iconic concert halls in the world,” said drummer and composer Antonio Sánchez. Four-time Grammy winner and nominated for the Golden Globes for having composed the music for the film “Birdman”, Sánchez came to pay homage to the place which gave him his first chance as a conductor.

The 55 Bar joins a growing list of jazz venues in New York – including Jazz Standard and Rue-B – forced to close after losing revenue during the pandemic shutdowns. “It’s a small place and COVID has had a big impact – a really big impact,” said club owner Scott Ellard. Musicians performed for the benefit of the club last fall, and a GoFundMe page launched in September with a goal of $100,000 raised almost $61,000.

In the end, that wasn’t enough to save the much-admired club, which Ellard had taken over from his mother, Queva Lutz, in the early 2000s. The space at 55 Christopher Street had opened to the public in 1919 – at the end of a previous pandemic a century ago. The dive bar began featuring live jazz in the 1980s, with guitarists like Mike and Leni Stern and Wayne Krantz establishing long-term residencies. But the 55 Bar was also a home for musical experimentation – until its last night.

“I have a thing with ‘Freedom Jazz Dance’ – I ended up using a Ukrainian scale,” Paul Jost told audience members, many of whom didn’t know until the night before that they would be listening to the last band at close out of the bar. “I was relearning it on this scale and wondering why am I doing this? But here we are…we’ve never done it as a quartet, but we’ll give it a shot.

“Only at 55 Bar!” shouted bartender Mark Kirby. The crowd whistled.

Jost’s on-the-fly experimentation, bouncing around the loud and bustling space on the parquet floor, offered evidence of an attribute musicians value most in the club: the ability to take risks in a welcoming environment.

“I run my flute over a lot of pedals, which is very risky because sometimes it doesn’t go the way I planned,” said Elsa Nilsson, a composer and flautist who worked five albums at 55 Bar. “It’s a very nice space to see, how does it react in a room?”

These opportunities were not limited to marquee artists. Singer Michelle Walker said she felt respected by the club, which gave her the chance to experiment in her early days, after changing careers in her late twenties to pursue music.

“Unless you’re already super established and you’ve been through it before and can get on the stage at a jazz festival, you can do whatever you want,” Walker said. “But where did you grow up? And this was the room where you could do that.

Kirby, himself a musician known to customers only by his last name, described watching the growth happen behind the bar. “I would say they kinda suck, but there’s something there,” the bartender said, teasing the acts he’d seen. But over the years, even months, he noticed a change: “They were getting better and better. And the next thing you know, they’re nominated for the Grammys.

The history of the place, its openness and its place for experimentation have never ceased to resonate with younger generations of musicians. Marcelle Pena, a 33-year-old Brazilian singer who moved to New York from Washington, D.C. a year ago, said 55 Bar became the place where she and her friends could build community while absorbing a fusion of sounds.

“People are now looking for authentic places, and we have fewer and fewer authentic places in cities,” Pena said. “All the economic pressures make them disappear. It is a loss for all of us. »

On Monday night, that loss exceeded the capacity of a cozy basement club on Christopher Street, which couldn’t hold all the patrons and musicians who showed up for one more night. After the second set ended indoors, brass musicians gathered in the street took inspiration from a telephone tree. They wanted to give 55 Bar a head start – which for jazz musicians meant a 16-piece band on the sidewalk, soloing and improvising until the police said it was time to stop. .

]]>