Jazz club – Jazz Fin http://jazzfin.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 05:22:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jazzfin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-14-150x150.png Jazz club – Jazz Fin http://jazzfin.com/ 32 32 Nardis Jazz Club – London Pop-Up by Turquazz (2022 EFG LJF) – London Jazz News https://jazzfin.com/nardis-jazz-club-london-pop-up-by-turquazz-2022-efg-ljf-london-jazz-news/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 13:55:52 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/nardis-jazz-club-london-pop-up-by-turquazz-2022-efg-ljf-london-jazz-news/ Pop-up Nardis Jazz Club (24, Exmouth Market, November 19, review by Rachel Coombes) Ozan Musluoğlu Quartet. Photo by Rachel Coombes As LJF celebrated its 30th anniversary with a sold-out electronic jazz show (or ‘jazz dance‘) at the 6,000-seat Printworks hall on Saturday (REVIEWED HERE), another jazz milestone was celebrated more intimately in Clerkenwell: the 20e […]]]>

Pop-up Nardis Jazz Club

(24, Exmouth Market, November 19, review by Rachel Coombes)

Ozan Musluoğlu Quartet. Photo by Rachel Coombes

As LJF celebrated its 30th anniversary with a sold-out electronic jazz show (or ‘jazz dance‘) at the 6,000-seat Printworks hall on Saturday (REVIEWED HERE), another jazz milestone was celebrated more intimately in Clerkenwell: the 20e anniversary of the renowned Nardis Jazz Club in Istanbul. Organized by non-profit Turquazz, the two-day pop-up event saw a small space within the Church of Our Most Holy Redeemer (Exmouth Market) transformed into a cozy club environment, echoing the cozy feel of Nardis itself. As the motto of the Turkish club says, “jazz better be heard in a club”.

director of Turquazz Batu Akyol teamed up with the owners of Nardis, the guitarist Under Focan and his wife Zuhal, to showcase the breadth of contemporary Anatolian jazz culture through documentary screenings, a ‘midday raki’ session and live music – complemented throughout by Turkish culinary specialties with the kind courtesy of Fahrettin Acar, chef at Gallipoli restaurants in Islington. The three live shows on Saturday (which followed a packed lineup on Friday, including a performance by Önder’s own quartet) were rightly diverse in musical expression.

Anatolian fusion set. Photo by Rachel Coombes

Indeed, Batu’s remark that “Anatolian musicians have the courage to take steps to integrate an international musical genre like jazz with other genres” rang especially true in the first show, a set largely improvised by the Anatolian fusion set. Ozan Baysal produces wonderful passages of taqsim (preliminary melodic improvisation) on the double-necked bağlama, immersing the audience in a typically Arabic soundscape. His style of play – known as selpe (an Anatolian technique that dispenses with the plectrum) – allowed for subtle manipulations of sound quality. Its long, meditative melodic lines were anchored by the sensitive drums of Burak Ersoz and the sweet electric bass of Bora Bekiroglu. This calmer lyricism was woven with passages of stomping hard rock, Anatolian rock and elements of progressive rock. The overall effect was of slowly undulating musical waveforms. It was clear that Tolga Zafer, on electronics and keyboard, was in his element experimenting with variations in timbre, moving swiftly from celestial gusts on the keys to resonant moans of the synth that hovered over the musical texture.

The second gig, Female voices from Turkey, presented three young singers recognized both in Turkey and abroad. Based in London Sézin Angelova is clearly inspired by the silky sound of neo-soul singers (from Erykah Badu to Cleo Sol). Sitting poised and perfectly still surrounded by the house band, she sang longingly of the emotion after the heartache (Immediacy – his own composition) and on the escape from the city (Gentle breeze). The set’s most intriguing number was its bossa nova-tinged arrangement of Turkish musician Benja Brozel’s song Chains. Sibel Demirwho trained as an opera singer, displayed an impressive vocal range, and her lively stage presence was infectious: an energetic version of Sonny Rollins St. Thomas made the audience applaud. In a direct nod to his classical training, Demir performed a jazz arrangement by Giulio Caccini Ave Maria, which worked well. The trombonist of the group Bulut Gulen and Gianni Boscarino on the keys have had ample opportunity to flaunt their prowess.

Dolunay Obruk. Photo by Rachel Coombes

The Last Singer Dolunay Obruk a particularly theatrical performance: drama and eccentricity were her watchwords (and it’s no surprise to learn that she also works as an actress). Obruk’s Arrangement of Classic Turkish Song Kalamis (by Munir Nurettin Selcuk) fused jazz idioms and vernacular styles to great effect. Three of his own compositions (Bakkal, Korktun Mu and Düğun) demonstrated his playful sense of humor; his lively gestural vocabulary conveyed the character of the songs for non-Turkish speakers like me.

The grand finale of the Nardis celebration was given to the bassist Ozan Musluoglu‘s quartet, which paid a musical tribute to the composer, pianist and saxophonist Tuna Otenel (b. 1947) – jazz mentor to many of today’s greatest Turkish jazz musicians. Indeed, as Ozan explained, Ötenel had taught each member of the band, who have been playing together since their college days (Uraz Kivaner keyboard, Batu Salliel on the saxophone and Ferit Odman to the battery). A few years ago, the quartet had the chance to play their reworkings of tunes from the maestro to Ötenel himself (many of which come from his seminal recording Jazz Semai, originally released in 1978), who was deeply moved by their efforts. From Saturday night’s performance, we can see why: each member of the group has channeled their astonishing virtuoso abilities to prove how colorful these compositions are. Şallıel on sax delivered intricate and seriously intricate lines in Ruyadaki Sesler; Ali’yi gördüm Ali’yi (a version of a traditional Turkish melody from the 16e century) was characterized by playful tempo changes. Koy Yolu and Şenlik (which had a fiery samba beat), were loud and exuberant triumphs. Poland was a suave number (from 2005 by Ötenel How much do you love me?), with delightful harmonic progressions. All the tunes bore subtle traces of the Ötenel cultural heritage, blended with a more “universal” style of jazz in a way that demonstrated their intrinsic musical malleability of the Turkish vernacular. It was a world-class performance and a fitting way to complete Turquazz’s tribute to Turkey’s fertile contemporary jazz scene.

If Nardis was a permanent fixture in London, especially with the likes of Musluoglu‘s quartet as guests would be a resounding success.

LINK: TURQUAZZ’s website

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Susan Mack “Yesterday” at the Birdland Jazz Club https://jazzfin.com/susan-mack-yesterday-at-the-birdland-jazz-club/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 08:03:53 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/susan-mack-yesterday-at-the-birdland-jazz-club/ On Monday, November 14, Susan Mack performed her new show “Yesterdays” on stage at the Birdland Jazz Club in midtown Manhattan.Having already had several sold-out tours at the Birdland Theatre, this special night saw her perform in the upstairs venue to another packed house. Ms. Mack brought her soft jazz vocal styles to a variety […]]]>

On Monday, November 14, Susan Mack performed her new show “Yesterdays” on stage at the Birdland Jazz Club in midtown Manhattan.
Having already had several sold-out tours at the Birdland Theatre, this special night saw her perform in the upstairs venue to another packed house.

Ms. Mack brought her soft jazz vocal styles to a variety of music that included both American Songbook standards and more contemporary pop tunes.
Songs by Cole Porter, Leiber & Stoller, Kern, Mercer, Ellington, Corea, the Bergmans, the Beatles and Stevie Wonder all fit to prove Susan’s affinity for good lyrics and solid musicianship.
Led by Lina Koutrakos, the singer was expertly backed by a trio of musicians including Tedd Firth on piano, David Finck on bass and Eric Halvorson on drums.

For a few songs, and as a special surprise for this new show, Susan called on the energetic trumpet and masterful voice of Benny Benack III, which came straight from the recording of his week-long television appearances with the band of show by Stephen Colbert. Hearing Ms. Mack and Mr. Benack as a harmonious vocal duo was a lovely addition to this lineup (and a bit of unplanned hilarity brought a lot of fun to the proceedings).

This show covered ‘yesterday’ material from the 30’s through the 90’s – but as Susan Mack continues to grow and develop her musical acumen… she is clearly looking to the future.

www.birdlandjazz.com

Photo credit: Kevin Alvey

Susan Mac

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Susan Mac

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Benny Benak III, Tedd FirthSusan Mack, David Fink, Eric Halvorson

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Susan Mac

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Tedd FirthSusan Mac

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Tedd FirthSusan Mack, David Fink, Benny Benak III, Eric Halvorson

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Tedd FirthSusan Mac

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Benny Benak III

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Tedd Firth, David FinkSusan Mack, Eric Halvorson, Benny Benak III

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Susan Mac, David Fink, Benny Benak III

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Benny Benak III

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Susan Mac

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Tedd FirthSusan Mac

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Susan Mac

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Susan Mac

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Susan Mac, Benny Benak III

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Susan Mac

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
David FinkSusan Mack, Eric Halvorson

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Susan Mac

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
David Fink

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Eric Halvorson

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
David FinkSusan Mack, Eric Halvorson

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Susan Mac

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
David FinkSusan Mack, Benny Benak III, Eric Halvorson

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Susan Mac, Benny Benak III, Eric Halvorson

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Susan Mac, Benny Benak III

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Susan Mac, Benny Benak III, Eric Halvorson

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Tedd Firth

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Susan Mac

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Susan Mac, Lina Koutrakos

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Lina Koutrakos, Jim CarusoSusan Mac

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Sean Patrick MurtaghSusan Mac

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Susan Mac, Matt Boulanger

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Susan Mac, Benny Benak III

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Gianni ValentiSusan Mac

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Susan Mack with her brothers, sister and mother

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Susan Mack with her son and friends

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
Susan Mack with her family


Join the BroadwayWorld Team

Are you a cabaret enthusiast in New York? We are looking for people like you to share your thoughts and ideas with our readers. Members of the BroadwayWorld team have access to shows to review, conduct interviews with artists, and meet and network with other theatergoers and arts workers.

Interested? Learn more here.


Edmund Begnall will present HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS at the Birdland Theater in December Photo

BIRDLAND THEATER will feature singer and violinist Edmund Bagnell in “Home for the Holidays” on Monday, December 12 at 8:30 p.m. The holiday countdown is on, and through music and humor, Bagnell shares his heartfelt and humorous recipe for a perfectly imperfect holiday season.


Lianne Marie Dobbs In A Helane Blumfield Photo Flash Photo

Cabaret entertainer and singer-actress Lianne Marie Dobbs hit the 54 Below stage this week with her special called Why CAN’T A Woman…? and Broadway World Cabaret photographer Helane Blumfield captured the action in a stunning photo shoot.


Michael Feinstein and Frank Sinatra make a great concert photo

Michael Feinstein performed at Zankel Hall this week with a concert of music made famous by Frank Sinatra and it was everything you hoped for when you walk into Carnegie Hall.


Santino Fontana shoots, Santino Fontana scores a shot

In a truly, truly entertaining evening, Santino Fontana joins every member of the audience with his new show at 54 Below.


From this author – Kevin Alvey

Photos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz ClubPhotos: Susan Mack “Yesterdays” at Birdland Jazz Club
November 18, 2022

Susan Mack debuted her new show at the Birdland Jazz Club. Susan brought her jazz voice to American Songbook and popular songs from the 1930s through the 1990s. Directed by Lina Koutrakos and backed by Susan’s trio of musicians including Tedd Firth (Piano), David Finck (Bass), Eric Halvorson (Drums ), with the appearance of trumpeter Benny Benack III.


Photos: St. Louis Cabaret Conference in New York 2022Photos: St. Louis Cabaret Conference in New York 2022
November 9, 2022

Tim Schall, producer and host of the St. Louis Cabaret Conference, leads a week of masterclasses and workshops for cabaret performers with a faculty comprised of the most respected professionals in the cabaret and nightclub world.


Photos: Joshua Stackhouse showcase for CANADA DAY at Feinstein's / 54 belowPhotos: Joshua Stackhouse showcase for CANADA DAY at Feinstein’s / 54 below
July 6, 2022

Joshua Stackhouse brought a group of his talented friends to sing his original songs on Canada Day at Feinstein’s/54 Below in New York.


Photos: Marilyn Maye: 94 years, of course, there is more!  at Feinstein/54 belowPhotos: Marilyn Maye: 94 years, of course, there is more! at Feinstein/54 below
April 21, 2022

“Marilyn Maye: 94 years old, of course there are more!” at Feinstein’s/54 Below in New York. Marilyn Maye celebrated her 94th birthday with a series of 10 shows at the New York nightclub. With songs from the Great American Songbook and the Broadway stage, Marilyn brought her special brand of energetic positivity to the Manhattan crowd and shows no signs of slowing down!


Photos: Jacob Khalil 'most requested' at the Birdland Theater NYCPhotos: Jacob Khalil ‘most requested’ at the Birdland Theater NYC
March 22, 2022

Singer/songwriter/pianist Jacob Khalil made his Birdland Theater debut on Sunday, March 20, 2022 with his show “Most Requested.” The show was a nifty set list mixing styles and genres from the American Songbook, jazz, pop and several outstanding original songs written by Khalil.


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Eliane Elias is coming to the Catalina Jazz Club from this week https://jazzfin.com/eliane-elias-is-coming-to-the-catalina-jazz-club-from-this-week/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 10:54:52 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/eliane-elias-is-coming-to-the-catalina-jazz-club-from-this-week/ Fresh off of her 2022 GRAMMY win for Best Latin Jazz Album for Mirror Mirror, (also recently nominated for a Latin GRAMMY), internationally acclaimed recording artist, pianist, singer, songwriter and arranger Eliane Elias brings her warmth and her Brazilian beauty at the iconic Catalina Jazz Club in Hollywood November 9-12. Eliane’s new album QUIETUDE, which […]]]>

Fresh off of her 2022 GRAMMY win for Best Latin Jazz Album for Mirror Mirror, (also recently nominated for a Latin GRAMMY), internationally acclaimed recording artist, pianist, singer, songwriter and arranger Eliane Elias brings her warmth and her Brazilian beauty at the iconic Catalina Jazz Club in Hollywood November 9-12.

Eliane’s new album QUIETUDE, which debuted on Billboard’s Traditional Jazz Chart at #1, showcases her sultry Portuguese voice and reminds the world why she’s called “The Reigning Queen of Bossa Nova.” This international superstar has performed in 74 countries and regularly features on jazz charts around the world.

“We recorded my new album just before the pandemic hit,” Elaine said in a recent interview. “So the reason I did ‘Quietude’ wasn’t because of the pandemic, but something I wanted to do in contrast to my previous album, which was just piano music.” She continues, “I hope people will come and join us because I promise it’s going to be a great night. I have a wonderful band and we’re doing a mini-set of the new album in the middle of the show, and it brings people à la Bossa nova – acoustically it’s really special.”

The Catalina Jazz Club is perfectly located in the heart of Hollywood and has begun a year of celebrating the 36th anniversary of the Catalina Jazz Club of Hollywood. Owner and Official Hostess of Hollywood Jazz Catalina Popescu said, “I invited Eliane to be part of our club’s anniversary because we share a love for music and history.”

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LEGO 10312 Jazz Club & Pizzeria modular rumored for 2023 https://jazzfin.com/lego-10312-jazz-club-pizzeria-modular-rumored-for-2023/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 19:28:02 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/lego-10312-jazz-club-pizzeria-modular-rumored-for-2023/ A new rumor for 2023 Lego Modular Building suggests that a pizzeria, jazz club and more could join the street. According to brick_clicker on Youtubethe 2023 Lego the modular building is set up to be a combination pizzeria and jazz club, something that may have been partially teased in the most recent entry. The report […]]]>

A new rumor for 2023 Lego Modular Building suggests that a pizzeria, jazz club and more could join the street.

According to brick_clicker on Youtubethe 2023 Lego the modular building is set up to be a combination pizzeria and jazz club, something that may have been partially teased in the most recent entry.

The report says it will go as 10312 Jazz Club & Pizzeria for around £200/$230 with 2,899 pieces released on January 1, 2023, as noted in a previous rumor. While such details are not hard to predict given recent price increases and the regular release schedule of the Lego Collection of modular buildings, the rumor continues with more details.

Five things we expect from next year’s LEGO Modular Building
More Details Rumored For The 2023 LEGO Modular Building Surface
A first rumor emerges for the new LEGO 2023 modular building

The contents of the building would be a pizzeria on the ground floor and a jazz club on the second floor and the source suggests that a third floor could also be included, as with previous modular buildings, but they don’t mention anything specific to this subject.

The source also believes that a promotional set will be released alongside the rumored 10312 Jazz Club & Pizzeria. This would be promotion 40586 Pizza Delivery Truck, which would be suitable for a pizzeria.

Earlier this year, 10297 Boutique Hotel received a thematic GWP in the form of 40532 Vintage Taxi. In this modular building, a Bulletin board on the side of the model announced a music hall with the image of a figurine playing the saxophone as well as an update of the note of the restaurant. While they may relate to past modular buildings, the music hall ad in particular could match this modular rumor.

Please remember that this report and others like it are just rumors and should be taken with caution until the Lego The group makes an official announcement if not.

We’ll likely hear more about any 2023 entry in the Lego The collection of modular buildings should be released soon at the beginning of the year, like the previous sets in the line.

Support the work that Brick Fanatics made by purchasing your Lego using our affiliate links.

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Oldest jazz club in DC Blues Alley reopens after roof fire https://jazzfin.com/oldest-jazz-club-in-dc-blues-alley-reopens-after-roof-fire/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 17:40:36 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/oldest-jazz-club-in-dc-blues-alley-reopens-after-roof-fire/ Reports of last week’s fire at Blues Alley in Georgetown sent shockwaves throughout the district and jazz fans around the world. News and social media images showed smoke billowing from the roof of the venerable historic jazz hall. Ten fire engines were on site, hosing down the roof to prevent the fire from spreading. In […]]]>

Reports of last week’s fire at Blues Alley in Georgetown sent shockwaves throughout the district and jazz fans around the world. News and social media images showed smoke billowing from the roof of the venerable historic jazz hall. Ten fire engines were on site, hosing down the roof to prevent the fire from spreading.

In a phone interview with DC Fire and EMS Media Affairs Manager Vito Maggiolo, he confirmed what happened at Blues Alley on October 24. ”

When he arrived at the club the following afternoon, Harry Schnipper, executive director and owner of Blues Alley Jazz Club, spoke about the next steps.

“We’re getting ready to turn on the humidifiers and start sanitizing the water,” he said, referring to the water damage caused by the firefighters’ response. “The only damage that occurred inside was to our speakers, amplifiers, console and possibly our piano.”

According to Norelco Carroll, the club’s manager, the bi-weekly schedule for this historic club is now posted. Blues Alley reopened for its first performance after the fire on Tuesday November 1, but will coincidentally be dark until November 4. Pianist and composer Bob James will perform November 4-6.

Founded in 1965, Blues Alley is the nation’s oldest jazz supper club. Known for hosting music’s top artists over the decades, like Dizzy Gillespie, Sonny Rollins, Phyllis Hyman, Billy Hart, John Pizzarelli and Freda Payne, to name a few, the club hopes to reopen on Tuesday October 31.

Follow the club on Twitter (@BluesAlley) for any further reopening updates.

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New Jazz Club and Accomplished Performer Amplify Gainesville Music Scene https://jazzfin.com/new-jazz-club-and-accomplished-performer-amplify-gainesville-music-scene/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 02:06:57 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/new-jazz-club-and-accomplished-performer-amplify-gainesville-music-scene/ The soft sounds of the saxophone and the bold rhythms of the drums fill the air of Baby J’s Bar every night Monday through Saturday, lingering in visitors’ ears long after closing. Since opening on April 26 and bringing jazz music to downtown Gainesville, this retro venue has become a hub for everything from boogie […]]]>

The soft sounds of the saxophone and the bold rhythms of the drums fill the air of Baby J’s Bar every night Monday through Saturday, lingering in visitors’ ears long after closing. Since opening on April 26 and bringing jazz music to downtown Gainesville, this retro venue has become a hub for everything from boogie to blues.

The bar, located at 7 W. University Ave. and attached to cry baby, is the first real jazz club in Gainesville in decades, said Tony Marquez, 41, director of entertainment at Baby J’s Bar. Although restaurants and clubs host jazz nights, Baby J’s is different; rather than live music playing in the background, that’s the focal point, he said.

Baby J’s is built around a stage with intimate tables for two and booths designed to immerse viewers in the performance. The venue has a capacity of about 50 people, and on an average night every seat is full, he said.

“We wanted that to be exactly what we do,” he said. “We have dedicated our vision to giving the jazz community a home – a home – to play in.”

Silviu Ciulei, 37, a professor of guitar studies at the University of Florida, said he felt drawn to Baby J’s because of the atmosphere of an old-school jazz club.

“It feels like a place from another era,” he said.

UF graduate student Jorge Galvan, 24, who teaches jazz fundamentals and jazz improvisation at UF, played saxophone. Scott Wilson played the Electronic Valve Instrument, or EVI. (Julia Bauer/WUFT News)

Baby J’s aims to promote local musicians and attract musical talent from all over Florida. Bands from Orlando, Jacksonville and Tampa traveled to perform at Baby J’s, Marquez said. He has booked over 40 acts for the bar since it opened.

One of the musicians Marquez has booked is Scott Wilson, 54, UF’s director of jazz studies. Marquez met him when he came to Baby J’s to see a show, he said.

Wilson said Baby J’s intimate setting is what sets the bar apart.

“You can feel it when you play because you look outside and see everyone watching the show,” he said. “Whereas when you play in many other venues, everyone does their own thing.”

Wilson has been UF’s director of jazz studies for 14 years, he said. Since becoming principal, he has created 12 jazz courses for students and prompted UF to add a master’s degree and minor in jazz studies. These courses provide the foundation and experience necessary for students to play music professionally, he said.

Kevin Orr, principal and professor at the UF School of Music, said Wilson and his students continue to exceed expectations and improve the jazz program.

“Scott Wilson is a towering performer and an inspiring musical leader in our music school jazz program,” he said. “We are thrilled that he will continue to raise the bar for jazz and bring our amazing jazz students to the Gainesville community.”

The jazz scene has gained momentum over the past five years, Wilson said. With jazz performances at Baby J’s and other Gainesville venues, such as the Jazz Series at The Keys Grill and Piano Bar and the Ocala Reilly Arts Center Jazz Series, people play jazz seven nights a week. The abundance of performance opportunities encourages graduates to stay in Gainesville instead of moving to different cities, he said.

“Jazz has completely taken off in Gainesville, and it’s everywhere,” he said.

Wilson became interested in jazz in college after receiving a vocal scholarship at UF. Although he initially attended college for singing, he began studying jazz music after joining the music fraternity Phi Mu Alpha, where he had to learn how to transcribe jazz solos played by other musicians.

He started playing the trumpet and earned a bachelor’s degree in music education from UF in 1991. He went on to earn two master’s degrees in jazz studies and music education from the University of North Texas, launching his music career and becoming one of the best trumpeters in the world, he says.

Before becoming director of UF Jazz Studies, his musical career took him to places far from his hometown of Fort Lauderdale. He was the musical director of Universal Studios Japan, where he wrote the music for his shows, he said.

One of Wilson’s favorite performances in his career was when he co-produced the Earth, Wind & Fire tribute album with some of the original musicians. They performed in Los Angeles with Stevie Wonder, he said.

“It was fun playing with them,” he said. “It was really great. I’ve played some amazing shows before, but people just don’t know the vibe of this band. It’s so positive. It’s filled with an amazing spirit.

Then, about three years ago, he chipped both front teeth while playing basketball, permanently altering his music career, he said.

“It affected my career as a trumpeter,” he said. “It’s just not the same thing. You can’t play exactly the same way.

Wilson decided that the piano would be his new forte. Despite his lifelong passion for the trumpet, he ended up loving the piano even more, he said.

“It’s so much better for me because now I’m a better teacher,” he said. “I can demonstrate more styles and I can write much faster.”

Wilson said he provides his students with the best education possible to help them become successful professional musicians. Over the past two years, his students have received four DownBeat Student Music Awardswhich is one of the most renowned and distinguished awards in jazz education.

“Everyone in my jazz band is brilliant,” he said. “They’re all very smart kids.”

Wilson will continue to perform at Baby J’s throughout October while playing other gigs around Gainesville. Above all, he hopes to give back to the young musicians he teaches at UF, he said.

“I thought maybe I could bring all my experience that I’ve learned from the industry to my students, and I can give them the same amazing careers in the world that I’ve had,” a- he declared. “And it works.”

About 50 patrons dined on a variety of entrees and desserts while watching the musicians play. (Julia Bauer/WUFT News)

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Multi-instrumentalist Charlotte Glasson proposes a date at the Steyning Jazz Club https://jazzfin.com/multi-instrumentalist-charlotte-glasson-proposes-a-date-at-the-steyning-jazz-club/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 10:37:16 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/multi-instrumentalist-charlotte-glasson-proposes-a-date-at-the-steyning-jazz-club/ Charlotte Glasson Club spokesman Colin Jilks said: “She is an instrumentalist par excellence, playing all saxophones, flutes, clarinet, bass clarinet, violin and viola. Versatile contemporary jazz and diverse originals are all intertwined with his bluesy, expressive saxophone work; indeed, his witty, exuberant, genre-defying music restores faith in true jazz. She brings together the vast and […]]]>
Charlotte Glasson

Club spokesman Colin Jilks said: “She is an instrumentalist par excellence, playing all saxophones, flutes, clarinet, bass clarinet, violin and viola. Versatile contemporary jazz and diverse originals are all intertwined with his bluesy, expressive saxophone work; indeed, his witty, exuberant, genre-defying music restores faith in true jazz. She brings together the vast and varied creative influences that drive her music, with New Orleans, gypsy jazz, South African townships, Latin music and world music all contributing to her captivating musical composition. The band’s line-up will be: Charlotte Glasson, Saxony; Mark Bassey, trombone; Chris Kibble, piano; Lloyd Coote, tuba and double bass; and Sam Glasson, drums. Her band has released eight recordings to date, and this current tour supported by Jazz Services will see Charlotte and her musicians promote the release of their latest studio manifestation, Bonito recorded in January 2022 and released in June. Having played at a number of top festivals across the UK, Charlotte’s winning blend of groovy musicianship won her the Best Newcomer award at the 2009 Marlborough Jazz Festival; but while it is undoubtedly deserved, it surely exceeds that applause and UK audiences will be offered the prospect of catching a seasoned British jazz star on the rise. Charlotte started playing the violin at age five, bought a guitar at age seven, taught herself to play, and then received a saxophone for Christmas at age twelve. Charlotte went on to study music at Kingston University, after which she embarked on a career as a session musician, bandleader and composer/arranger.

The bar is provided by Riverside Brewery, doors open at 7:15 p.m. and the show starts at 8 p.m. The Steyning Jazz Club meets at the Steyning Centre, Fletcher’s Croft, Steyning. BN44 3XZ. Information from Colin Jilks on 01903 810395. He builds on last month’s success: “Spats Langham was a stunning performer with the audience rising to thunderous applause at the end.

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Wally’s Cafe Jazz Club Continues to Serve Boston’s Jazz Community – The Daily Free Press https://jazzfin.com/wallys-cafe-jazz-club-continues-to-serve-bostons-jazz-community-the-daily-free-press/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 04:18:42 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/wallys-cafe-jazz-club-continues-to-serve-bostons-jazz-community-the-daily-free-press/ Wally’s Cafe Jazz Club at 427 Massachusetts Avenue. The historic cultural and musical center reopened on September 8 after being closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. BRENDAN NORDSTROM/DFP STAFF Wally’s Cafe Jazz Club, located along Massachusetts Avenue, has been a cultural and musical mecca for generations, welcoming musicians and audiences of all ages and backgrounds. […]]]>
Wally’s Cafe Jazz Club at 427 Massachusetts Avenue. The historic cultural and musical center reopened on September 8 after being closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. BRENDAN NORDSTROM/DFP STAFF

Wally’s Cafe Jazz Club, located along Massachusetts Avenue, has been a cultural and musical mecca for generations, welcoming musicians and audiences of all ages and backgrounds.

Founded in 1947 by Joseph Walcott and still family-owned, Wally’s reopened for the first time since the COVID-19 pandemic on September 8.

Before Wally closed, pianist Kevin Harris and his band, Sphere 427, played every Friday and Saturday night. He said Wally’s respects the tradition and creativity of African-American music while incorporating contemporary jazz sounds.

“The shutdown was an interruption of all of that on a tangible level…but at the same time, that spirit and persistence and creativity weren’t,” Harris said.

Gaby Cotter has been a Latin jazz singer at Wally’s since 2016. She said closing Wally’s was difficult for owners, musicians and community members.

“During the pandemic, they got the support from the community,” Cotter said, “They reopened the fully renovated place…it’s still like a very magical little place.”

Although the venue itself has undergone changes, manager Frank Poindexter said Wally’s is back to what it was before – three bands every night, seven days a week.

“We are dedicated to my grandfather’s legacy,” Poindexter said. “We are also committed to providing a forum for musicians to perform and perfect their craft.”

Bonnie Johnson, producer and host of the 90.5 WICN Colors of Jazz radio show, said the venue is unique because it creates intimacy around the live music experience.

Noah Preminger, a professional saxophonist and member of Sphere 427, said students come to Wally’s to learn from older professional performers, not just musically, but by hanging out and talking to each other.

“It’s the only jazz music venue where people actually hang out in Boston,” he said.

Johnson said the legacy of jazz music is important because it is an African-American art form that lives on through generations and creates a musical foundation for creativity and improvisation.

“Wally’s is like an incubator, so the fact that young musicians can come and play and then be heard by their peers is an inspiration to me for what the future holds for jazz,” he said. she stated.

Preminger said the growing popularity of streaming platforms is taking income away from musicians, especially musicians who play less traditional styles of music like jazz.

“For an art form that is, frankly, unpopular, it’s crucial to have concert halls that support it, otherwise you wouldn’t hear it. It would be up to the consumer to just look it up on the internet,” Preminger said. “It’s important to support black-owned businesses, it’s important to support jazz, and it’s important to pay for the music.”

Following its reopening, Poindexter said Wally’s is incorporating its own live stream that will allow more people to experience jazz without worrying about the possibility of contracting COVID-19.

“Wally’s is an incredible resource for the jazz community and beyond…it’s both a training ground for young musicians…and it’s kind of a throwback,” said JazzBoston President Ken Field.

Non-profit organizations like JazzBoston champion the jazz community in Boston, highlighting the African-American heritage of jazz and the importance of cross-cultural collaboration in music.

Field said the improvisatory nature of jazz creates a shared experience that connects people through interpersonal situations as they create new music and sounds together.

“Jazz is important as a creative art form for several reasons, one of them being the African-American heritage of jazz music,” Field said. “It’s an art form that grew out of the African-American community.”

He said jazz also allows musicians to “collaborate across cultures” because jazz taps into other influences like Latin American music.

“The Latinx community and people who want to do jazz, Latin jazz, or African jazz…are so open to giving you a space to play,” Cotter said. “Places like Wally’s are so important in the community because they allow you to do all of this together and also develop your musical sense.”

Johnson also said younger audiences would keep the spirit of jazz alive by supporting live music.

“There’s a perception that jazz has an older audience and I don’t agree,” she said. “I think it’s an urban legend… Young people come because they eat new music.”

Johnson added that places like Wally’s also elevate women’s voices in jazz and the cultural spirit and legacy of jazz music.

Cotter said she went to Wally’s as a student and found the club a great place to experiment.

“No matter how tough your week has been or how much homework you have to do… [after going to Wally’s] you feel alive again,” she said.

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The Blue Arrow Jazz Club on Sauchiehall Street in Glasgow announces its closure https://jazzfin.com/the-blue-arrow-jazz-club-on-sauchiehall-street-in-glasgow-announces-its-closure/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 11:58:52 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/the-blue-arrow-jazz-club-on-sauchiehall-street-in-glasgow-announces-its-closure/ A popular downtown bar and live music venue announced news of its closure today. The Blue Arrow Jazz Club on Sauchiehall Street has become a celebrated fixture of the city’s music scene, hosting an incredible line-up of world-class artists since opening in 2018. The venue is well known for championing local talent and has provided […]]]>

A popular downtown bar and live music venue announced news of its closure today.

The Blue Arrow Jazz Club on Sauchiehall Street has become a celebrated fixture of the city’s music scene, hosting an incredible line-up of world-class artists since opening in 2018.

The venue is well known for championing local talent and has provided a stage for many up-and-coming artists from across the city over the years.

READ MORE: Blink-182 add extra Glasgow date due to ‘incredible demand’ for tickets

This morning on social media a member of the team said: “We are now closed for good.

“A big thank you to all the amazing artists who have graced our stage.

“A big thank you to all the fantastic staff over the years.

“Thanks to you, the public, continue to support local live events whenever you can.

“Times are getting tougher.

“It would be even more difficult without live music.

“I like you.”

READ MORE: Major retailer to open Scotland’s largest store in Silverburn

Fans of the basement bar have since shared messages of support in the comments, thanking its owners for providing a one-of-a-kind evening.

One said: “Thank you for all you have done for Scottish jazz.

“I saw my first jazz concert here at the start of my trip and was proud to have the chance to play before closing time.”

Another added: ‘Very sad news, I spent many happy nights in your excellent place. Thank you for putting on so many great shows.

“You will miss us.”

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Wally’s Cafe Jazz Club welcomes the public again for the first time since 2020 https://jazzfin.com/wallys-cafe-jazz-club-welcomes-the-public-again-for-the-first-time-since-2020/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 18:45:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/wallys-cafe-jazz-club-welcomes-the-public-again-for-the-first-time-since-2020/ In 1947, Joseph L. Walcott opened Wally’s Cafe Jazz Club. He quickly became famous among black musicians and patrons. If you were Duke Ellington or Cannonball Adderly, you played Wally’s. Last month, the nearly 80-year-old club reopened its doors to the live public for the first time since 2020. In this episode of Business of […]]]>

In 1947, Joseph L. Walcott opened Wally’s Cafe Jazz Club. He quickly became famous among black musicians and patrons. If you were Duke Ellington or Cannonball Adderly, you played Wally’s.

Last month, the nearly 80-year-old club reopened its doors to the live public for the first time since 2020. In this episode of Business of Boston, we spoke with Frank Poindexter, CEO and co-owner of Wally’s, about what which you can hear at Wally’s this weekend, and seven days a week.

This interview transcript has been edited for clarity.

Interview Highlights

Upon reopening after two years of closure

“So through [a lot of] assistance, we were able to maintain our activity and be able to reopen in due time because it is such a small site. You had to pay attention to [aerosols] coming out of all the instruments. So we were in a unique position, we couldn’t really open up because we would have exposed our customers to the possibility of catching COVID… The most important thing for us is the safety of our customers.”

On live music streaming because of the pandemic

“We have teams of musicians from all over the planet… We are able to help these kids develop their craft. And then their supporters and family members want to see them be able to perform and grow as musicians. … We are now working to put all this in place so that we can broadcast music because we have three bands a day and we want to make these young people known.

On the power of jazz music and the skills needed to play it

“Ultimately you take an inanimate object and make it an animate object. Doing something creative, it’s different than using electronic instruments and stuff like that. You really had to practice and practice, for hours and hours, days and days in order to be able to master those instruments. And the other thing was that those skills were transferable, that focus…it’s like today, you see our young people, they can have a short attention span and stuff like that. But in those days you had to read books, you weren’t able to look at screens.

On how Wally’s stayed open while other jazz clubs closed

“The first thing is that we are a family business, we are committed to what we do and we are committed to our grandfather’s legacy. And then the other thing is that we are in Boston and our location is centrally located two blocks south of Boston Symphony Hall…we are surrounded by some of the greatest institutions for training musicians.So you have the New England Conservatory, you have the Boston Conservatory, you have the Berklee College of Music, Harvard University, Boston University, Northeastern University. So in terms of training musicians, it’s a special place. You really don’t get that anywhere else…so we let’s get… the most talented young people from around the world, who come here to train to be musicians, and they’re not just musicians, they could be sound engineers, they could be songwriters, you know they could just study music business…it touches every part of the music industry. And so we are lucky to have a forum where these young people can practice and perfect it. [their] Arts and crafts.”

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