Jazz music – Jazz Fin http://jazzfin.com/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 16:13:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://jazzfin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-14-150x150.png Jazz music – Jazz Fin http://jazzfin.com/ 32 32 Jazz Music: Interesting Facts and Why It’s Good for Your Body and Mind | Fashion https://jazzfin.com/jazz-music-interesting-facts-and-why-its-good-for-your-body-and-mind-fashion/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 08:12:11 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/jazz-music-interesting-facts-and-why-its-good-for-your-body-and-mind-fashion/ Author: Mark PetersPosted 20 hours ago When it comes to jazz music, the first thing that comes to mind are the Roaring Twenties. Jazz’s popularity surged in the 1920s, and it is linked to the nostalgia for sultry crooners, The Great Gatsby, and flapper dresses. Jazz can be seen as a cultural movement that must […]]]>

Author: Mark PetersPosted 20 hours ago

When it comes to jazz music, the first thing that comes to mind are the Roaring Twenties. Jazz’s popularity surged in the 1920s, and it is linked to the nostalgia for sultry crooners, The Great Gatsby, and flapper dresses. Jazz can be seen as a cultural movement that must be appreciated.

Jazz is the only music that allows you to play the same notes, with moving improvisations. It has also been a hit theme for casinos.

Jazz music entertainment is always an important part of casinos which you can add to the fun of online gambling with incentives like a mobile casino bonus.

Fun facts about the musical genre

Here are some interesting facts that will make you enjoy music even more.

1. Music has faced opposition

When jazz first entered the scene, it faced opposition, as it was banned in public dance halls by more than 60 communities. This was fueled mainly by the suggestive dances of the music. However, these bottlenecks have not weakened the growing popularity of the musical genre. Radio broadcasts and recordings continued to extend the reach of music beyond dance halls.

Interestingly, even classically trained musicians opposed the music despite being impressed with its sound. They must have felt threatened by jazz artists who relied on experimentation and practice to improve their skills. For them, they had to follow a classic training to learn their trade.

Before jazz became what we hear today, it encountered a lot of opposition.

2. There are many ways to pronounce jazz

It is important to note that jazz started out as a slang word. Additionally, people believe the term was borrowed from baseball, where it was used to describe players who played with passion. People have different beliefs about the origin of jazz, and likewise, have different ways of spelling it.

3. Jazz artists have secret signals

There is a lot going on on stage during a performance, and there is a lot of non-verbal communication between musicians. This explains why jazz artists can seamlessly improvise together to deliver great music.

These signals are vital for musicians to alert each other to what is to come. For example, a musician might nod their head when their solo is almost done to invite the next performance. Some point their heads with their fingers. They could also point an artist in the room to give them the spotlight.

If you are passionate about performing, you might notice some of these signals.

4. Jazz and classical Indian music have a lot in common

Jazz and classical Indian music have a lot in common. Two systems define the two genres, and Carnatic and Hindustani characterize Indian classical music. These two offer artists many opportunities to improvise and demonstrate rhythmic and melodic virtuosity.

It should also be noted that the pulse-driven fashions and rhythms beautify both musical genres.

5. Jazz paved the way for new styles of dance in American dancehalls

Argentinian tango, charleston and black bottom are some of the dance styles that jazz has introduced to nightclubs. The dance improved from the classical tango, giving rise to dancings and public music. After the introduction of jazz, a wide range of dance styles would be constantly being created.

What are the benefits of listening to jazz music?

Music has enormous effects on our mind and body. There are many genres of music, and jazz is one of the most intentional of them. Here are some of the benefits of listening to this genre.

1. It can stimulate your brain

Jazz is relaxing music, and this category of music impacts brain waves, resulting in several cognitive benefits. You activate alpha brain waves while listening to jazz, which calms your mind and reduces anxiety.

Delta brain waves are activated in the process and are known to induce better sleep. People who listen to jazz tend to be creative. This is because it activates the theta brain waves associated with creativity.

Listening to jazz will also stimulate your memory, your verbal mood ability, and also

reduce your chances of developing depression.

2. Reduces high blood pressure

Also known as chronic hypertension, if high blood pressure is left untreated it can lead to serious complications. One can have a stroke, a heart attack, ruptured blood vessels and dementia, to name a few.

Jazz is on the list of music known to lower blood pressure and reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular complications.

3. Can help relieve pain

Did you know that listening to music can help you deal with pain? While most people rely on prescription drugs for pain relief, doctors recommend listening to relaxing music. Whether you have a migraine or are recovering from an operation, listening to jazz music will force your brain to resist the pain.

4. Can increase productivity

Jazz is not a fun genre of music. This means that you can play it even while you are managing a task. Music can boost your focus and improve your productivity. You will notice better results connecting to jazz when preparing for an exam or presentation.

Conclusion

Jazz music is historic, classical and certainly not boring. Each note will keep you going and the skill demonstrated by jazz musicians will amaze you. Find a radio station, venue or jazz show near you and let the music grow in you.


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Jazz music that got us through another year of the pandemic https://jazzfin.com/jazz-music-that-got-us-through-another-year-of-the-pandemic/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 22:06:25 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/jazz-music-that-got-us-through-another-year-of-the-pandemic/ Jazz music can have many different moods and themes, but as we soon end our second year in a global pandemic, our hosts have turned to joyful and expressive music. Feel the many atmospheres of the year through the best jazz songs of 2021, hand-picked by the jazz entertainers of CapRadio. Mike LeDonne: “It’s all […]]]>

Jazz music can have many different moods and themes, but as we soon end our second year in a global pandemic, our hosts have turned to joyful and expressive music.

Feel the many atmospheres of the year through the best jazz songs of 2021, hand-picked by the jazz entertainers of CapRadio.

Mike LeDonne: “It’s all your fault” Rock with you

I can’t think of a contemporary musician who tells the story of jazz to his future better than Mike LeDonne. A versatile pianist and master of the Hammond B3 organ, LeDonne performs with passion, grace and fire.

Having worked with Milt Jackson and Benny Golson, LeDonne brings the influence of jazz masters such as Wynton Kelly and Jimmy Smith to a contemporary format.

His latest CD is dedicated to Dr Lonnie Smith. Mike works in both a quartet and a big band. On the big band treatment of Michael Jackson’s hit “Rock With You”, LeDonne’s organ burns with shear intensity. The swing arrangement is by Dennis Mackrel.

– Gary G. Vercelli, jazz music director

Louis Hayes: “Crisis” arab arabic

Born in Detroit, drummer Louis Hayes arrived in New York City at the age of 19 to join Horace Silver’s jazz group.

From his promising beginnings with this jazz master, Hayes has had a 60-year career supporting an elite group of jazz masters, including Cannonball Adderley, Oscar Peterson, Dexter Gordon, Kenny Burrell, Sonny Rollins and Woody Shaw.

On his latest album, Hayes – this time as a conductor – pays homage to several of his colleagues, including saxophonist Joe Farrell, who composed the simple cook “Arab Arab”. Also, on this track, saxophonist Abraham Burton and vibraphonist Steve Nelson take worthy solos.

– Gary G. Vercelli

Ray Obiedo: “The Latin Jazz Vol. 2 “- Viva Tirado

Veteran Bay Area guitarist Ray Obiedo has composed many satisfying originals on his latest project, working with some of the area’s top players including David K. Matthews, David Belove, Sheila E and David Garibaldi.

However, it is Obiedo’s moving treatment of Gerald Wilson’s cha cha cha “Viva Tirado” that steals the show. I’m sure the late frontman of the big band would approve of Obiedo’s update of this classic arranged here for a smaller band and featuring an excellent trumpet solo by Mike Olmos.

– Gary G. Vercelli

Brandee Younger: “Somewhere Different” – Complaint

The talented budding harpist’s second full-length album, Brandee Younger, is also her debut album on the Impulse! a record company. The classical history of the instrument certainly doesn’t prevent Younger from exploring jazz, rock and hard groove. The catchy rhythm of the first track, Reclamation, is undeniably full of floating lines and rich textures.

– Avery Jeffry, Jazz Animator

Emmet Cohen: “Future Stride” – Future stride

Emmet Cohen quickly became a fixture on the New York jazz scene. Thanks to Mack Avenue Records, he kicked off 2021 with a blast from the past and one rooted squarely in the Big Apple.

The Stride Piano is a style born out of the Harlem pianists of the 1920s. Cohen’s new treatment is both solid in tradition and refreshing and innovative. Check out the title track to see how responsive and fun his trio is with bassist Russell Hall and drummer Kyle Poole.

– Avery Jeffry

Christian McBride: “Living at Village Vanguard” – Stick and move

It wouldn’t really be one of my lists without a little bit of Christian McBride. It’s not difficult either, considering the volume of output from the legendary bassist.

This time around it’s another live from famous New York nightclub, The Village Vanguard, but with his band called Right inside. Saxophonist Steve Wilson, pianist Peter Martin, vibraphonist Warren Wolf and drummer Carl Allen together form a swing powerhouse with McBride.

My favorite track is the last in the series, Stick and move, because it offers a solo swap between bass and drums that will keep you on the edge of your seat for a good 5 minutes straight.

– Avery Jeffry

Samara Joy: “Samara Joy” – Stardust

Samara Joy’s eponymous debut album is particularly striking. The singer has just turned 22 and already has the grace and poise of a seasoned veteran. In this rendition of Hoagy Carmichael’s classic “Stardust”, she eloquently demonstrates why this song is timeless.

– Andrew Mills, Jazz Announcer

Alexa Tarantino: “Firefly” – Moments of mindfulness

When saxophonist Alexa Tarantino crafted her third solo album in 2020, she wanted to capture the myriad of emotions surrounding the isolation many of us were experiencing back then. She certainly accomplished this with “Firefly”.

This cut composed by vibraphonist and band member Behn Gillece helps us remember that as difficult as it was, there were often cracks of light that shone brightly through the darkness.

– Andrew Mills

Julian Lage: “Squint” – Study

Julian Lage is my favorite guitarist. His sound. His technique. His art. the unlimited and contagious joy it comes from the fact that he’s a guitarist – It’s inspiring.

There are a lot of fantastic tracks on his first Blue Note “Squint”, but this lead guitar opening cut shows everything I love about Julian Lage and more.

– Andrew Mills

Gretchen Parlato: “Flor” – Rosa

This is singer and songwriter Gretchen Parlato’s first release since 2013, and the wait was well worth the wait as this record is simply breathtaking.

“Rosa” is my favorite piece. The counterpoint between Parlato’s voice and Artyom Manukyan’s cello creates a hypnotic texture that is not often heard on an album called “jazz”. This music is a genre challenge and beautiful.

– Andrew Mills


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5 artists who pioneered the electronic crossover of jazz music – Billboard https://jazzfin.com/5-artists-who-pioneered-the-electronic-crossover-of-jazz-music-billboard/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/5-artists-who-pioneered-the-electronic-crossover-of-jazz-music-billboard/ Francisco Mora-Catlett is a legend in the field where jazz intersects with electronic music, as it is the space in which he has lived for most of his professional life. Son of Mexican painter Francisco Mora and African-American sculptor Elizabeth Catlett, Mora-Catlett’s career began in Mexico City, where he worked as a session musician for […]]]>

Francisco Mora-Catlett is a legend in the field where jazz intersects with electronic music, as it is the space in which he has lived for most of his professional life.

Son of Mexican painter Francisco Mora and African-American sculptor Elizabeth Catlett, Mora-Catlett’s career began in Mexico City, where he worked as a session musician for Capitol Records in the late 1960s while making music. experimental with jazz icons (and his own heroes) like Sun Ra, John Coltrane and Miles Davis.

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At the prestigious Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mora-Catlett studied with Parisian electronic music pioneer Jean Nate Henry and learned reel production, before playing some of the first electronic instruments after joining the Sun Ra Arkestra in the ’70s, as the composer’s drummer and experimental jazz legend. Mora-Catlett went on to study at Berklee College of Music in Boston in the 1980s, liaising with pioneering jazz drummer Max Roach in the 1990s.

It was around this same time, when Mora-Catlett was a visiting professor at Michigan State University, that one of his five daughters informed him of the techno revolution unfolding in nearby Detroit, and ultimately introduced him to Detroit techno legend Carl Craig. Soon after, Mora-Catlett was performing with Craig as part of his 1996 jazz / electronic fusion project, Innerzone Orchestra. Becoming Craig’s mentor, Mora-Catlett told the producer that musicians of color pioneering electronic music were nothing new: it had been happening since the 1950s, when Sun Ra started using the first drum machine and Robert Moog’s electric pianos. This mentorship sparked Craig’s interest in jazz, and Craig went on to release records of the genre on his longtime label, Planet E.

The circle was therefore complete when Mora-Catlett released his latest album, Electric worlds, via Planet E on November 19. Making this music at Berklee College of Music during the pandemic, the nine-track album intersects space jazz with elements of ambient, n’b and other sounds that are both futuristic and vintage. Using little used instruments, says Mora-Catlett Electric worlds seeks to answer a question that experimental musicians like him and the greats with whom he has worked have long been thinking through music: “Who am I, what am I and what is the universe?”

Here, in her own words, Mora-Catlett discusses five key artists who have bridged the divide between jazz and electronic music.

Sun Ra

Sun Ra goes a long way. He started using an electric piano in 1952, around the time everyone told him he was crazy to use it in jazz. He was advanced, already using a Moog synthesizer in 1958 that Robert Moog had built for him. It was one of two prototypes – and I heard from Sun Ra that Robert Moog said he wanted it back, but Sun Ra didn’t give it to him.

When I was with Sun Ra in the 1970s, I remember him coming to the house where the orchestra lived in Germantown, Philadelphia, with an old, like a drum machine, like the ones you put on on a Hammond organ. The guy who, when you press it, and you hit the rumba, cha cha, or foxtrot, plays it the old fashioned way. He told me to get on the drums and play with them, and I told him that they weren’t real drums, that they were a machine. He turns to me and says seriously, “You’re going to have to learn to play with one of them in your life, so get on the drums.”

He was a real visionary, later in the mid-90s when I was touring with Carl Craig’s InnerZone Orchestra, every time I took the stage I heard Sun Ra in my ear say, ” You are going to have to learn to play with one of them in your life. He was absolutely right. His vision transcended what was happening at the time. I consider him to be the herald of the space age for planet earth, you know? Because he was already talking about this “Space Is the Place” thing since the 1940s.

Miles davis

I saw Miles Davis in Boston when I went to Berklee College of Music in the early 1970s, at the Jazz Workshop. The band started out playing so powerful, but got exhausted playing on their own. Miles heard it, and as soon as he got on stage he only played one note – and all the energy kicked in. Never seen or heard anything like it.

It was during the so-called first electric period from 1968 to 1975. I think his electric period continued until the time of his death, because when he came back after some sort of retirement he continued with it. an electric group, using synthesizers. People think his first experience with the electronic scene was for Miles in the sky, where he used Herbie Hancock on a Fender Rhodes. But when I saw him with the Live-Evil group, I couldn’t believe what was going on. He had also added a wah wah pedal to his trumpet, and the sensitivity was a bit like the way Jimi Hendrix played.

Herbie Hancock

Mwandishi, Crossings, Sextant, Headhunters, Thrust – all these albums really marked Herbie Hancock’s experience with electronic music. I saw him play in the 1980s in Detroit. His equipment was amazing. All he had there, from synthesizers to the vocoder that he brought just to sing along, are major developments.

I think Herbie Hancock really loves tech, and he’s always been ahead, trying to do something new. One of my favorite albums is Thrust. This period for me is something that I have seen and experienced. The wonderful coloring of electronic music behind it, which he really loved. I really loved that, all of his experiments. He would bring an acoustic instrument, with multireedist Bennie Maupin, and Wah Wah Watson on electric guitar, and an electric bass player – it was really an electric band.

Joe zawinul

His fascination with electronic music equipment is fantastic. He had an R-2600, a Rhodes of course, an Oberheim, an ARP, a Prophet, a Korg, a Vocoder emulator – the list was endless. During his time with The Weather Report, he created an incredible atmosphere. We’re talking about jazz musicians who were actually exploring new avenues in sound and coming out with sound ideas that weren’t there. That brings us back to 58, when everyone said to Sun Ra, “You’re crazy. No one will use electronic instruments in jazz. It was a huge development and a change in this type of mentality.

Georges duke

It is a great contribution to the world of jazz and electronic music. Mainly in the idea of ​​combining funk-music, R&B, etc. His work with Frank Zappa, with the Mothers of Invention – he brought with him an incredible amount of synthesizers and electronic instruments. Also works with Jean-Luc Ponty, an avid user of five-string electric violins. And along with so many other artists and a producer, George Duke made a significant contribution to what are now common genres in electronic music.

Chick Korea

You can’t get around Chick Corea. The Return to Forever set is the one that released Romantic warrior. I saw this band live, and I couldn’t believe the electronic vibe they created around it. It was unbelievable. Chick had this whole experience with Miles Davis, which they called fusion at the time. Their work was an extension of the larger direction in which the music was heading. It really turned me on, of course.

In the 70s I had the opportunity to work in a music store where I sold some of the first DJ decks available at the time. I presented some of the early synthesizers where I showed them for demonstration, how you interconnect them. I had Korgs and Crumars, Yamahas, that sort of thing. It was quite a stream of jazz musicians who got to work with electronics, and I’m sure people like Chick Corea pioneered what is now electronic music.


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The Inaugural Jazz Music Awards: Celebrating the Spirit of Jazz is scheduled for October 2022 https://jazzfin.com/the-inaugural-jazz-music-awards-celebrating-the-spirit-of-jazz-is-scheduled-for-october-2022/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/the-inaugural-jazz-music-awards-celebrating-the-spirit-of-jazz-is-scheduled-for-october-2022/ Wendy Williams, Managing Director of Jazz 91.9 WCLK (Photo credit: Lenna Davis from Lenna Davis Photography) * The inauguration Jazz Music Awards: Celebrating the Spirit of Jazz announced its awards ceremony, scheduled for Saturday 22 October 2022, to Cobb Energy Performing Arts Center in the subway in Atlanta, Georgia. For five decades, the venue has […]]]>

Wendy Williams, Managing Director of Jazz 91.9 WCLK (Photo credit: Lenna Davis from Lenna Davis Photography)

* The inauguration Jazz Music Awards: Celebrating the Spirit of Jazz announced its awards ceremony, scheduled for Saturday 22 October 2022, to Cobb Energy Performing Arts Center in the subway in Atlanta, Georgia. For five decades, the venue has hosted Broadway shows, ballets, concerts, operas and more.

Presented by Jazz 91.9 WCLK, a public radio station licensed at Clark University in Atlanta and known as “Atlanta’s Jazz Station,” the Jazz Music Awards (JMA) will be a dynamic presentation that recognizes the iconic spirit of jazz by shining the spotlight on mainstream and contemporary jazz musicians who continue to make a mark on music and the industry. Hosts, artists, presenters and special award winners will be announced at a later date.

The Jazz Music Awards will recognize a wide range of creators from the national and international jazz world, from traditional and contemporary musicians, singers and major groups, to composers, to individual songs and to complete albums. The eligibility period for the 2022 Awards Ceremony begins from April 1, 2021 to March 31, 2022. Online submissions will begin on New Years Day, Saturday January 1, 2022, through Thursday, March 31, 2022. Categories of prices are as follows: Best Mainstream Artist, Best Contemporary Artist, Best Duo, Group or Big Band, Best New Jazz Artist (contemporary or general public), Best Jazz Singer, Bis an International Artist (contemporary or general public), Best Mainstream Album, Best Contemporary Album, Jazz innovator of the year, Composer of the Year, Educator of the Year, Jazz Legacy Award, and Song of the year (Fan vote).

“In the 47 years that WCLK has been on the air, we have performed and specialized in all genres of jazz,” says Wendy williams, Managing Director of WCLK, who has been at the helm for 27 years. We play mainstream, contemporary, fusion, direct and modern jazz. We have gone through the whole range. This is the history of the resort and quite frankly, the secret of our success. We are still standing. And for over fifteen years, we have supplemented our show with the presentation of live jazz concerts, which have helped support the operations of our NPR member nonprofit public radio station. We’ve always enjoyed the sold-out crowds and the joy listeners feel when they see us at concerts.

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Rushion McDonald, Founder of 3815 Media (Photo courtesy of WCLK Radio)

Williams and David Linton, station’s program director and former record company director, contacted Rushion McDonald, the founder of 3815 Media, who will lead production on the next Starry Celebration. A two-time Emmy Award-winning executive producer and three-time NAACP Image Award winner, McDonald is the host of the popular “Money Making Conversations” podcast. 3815 Media will produce the Jazz Music Awards and its red carpet event with plans to launch a live TV show worldwide.

McDonald’s is the architect behind the production of multimedia platforms for major clients, including Steve Harvey’s career and the blockbuster Hoodie Awards, later renamed Neighborhood Awards. Her extensive work as a writer and producer also includes collaborations with other famous talents such as Kevin Hart, Taraji P. Henson, Gabrielle Union, Mo’Nique, Tia and Tamara Mowry, Stephen A. Smith, Jamie Foxx and others from New York. City in Hollywood. He has also created national media campaigns for State Farm, Ford, JC Penny, General Mills, iHeart Radio, Radio One, NBC, BET and ABC networks, to name a few. For more information on Rushion McDonald, visit rushionmcdonald.com.

Jazz 91.9 WCLK Program Director David C Linton (Photo credit: Reginald Duncan of Cranium Creation)

Linton says, “This is an exciting time in the 47 year history of Jazz 91.9 WCLK. I worked with this station as a label manager and I know how pivotal this has been in the careers of so many artists, especially jazz artists, and it still is today. When Wendy told me about returning to the station as Program Director in 2018, I was thrilled. Now to have the opportunity to help write another chapter in WCLK history is an honor. Now is the time for the Jazz Music Awards and WCLK is well positioned to present this long overdue awards show. It will be a historic and momentous event for all those who love jazz. “

Three-time Grammy Award winner and NEA Jazz Master Terri Lyne Carrington (Photo credit: Delphine Diallo)

The Jazz Music Awards committee was awarded a three-time Grammy Award-winning recording artist and NEA Jazz Master, Terri Lyne Carrington, who will lead the musical direction and act as a consultant for the first-ever awards ceremony. With his technical magic and deep creativity, Carrington has become one of the giants of jazz music today. A multi-talented drummer, songwriter, producer and educator, Carrington began her professional career at age ten and received a full scholarship from Berklee College of Music at age eleven. Her artistry and commitment to education have earned her honorary doctorates from the Manhattan School of Music and Berklee College of Music, where she is currently the Founder and Artistic Director of the Berklee Institute of Jazz and Gender Justice.

To date, she has released eight career albums. She is the first female artist to win the Grammy Award for best jazz instrumental album, which she received for her 2013 project, Money Jungle: Provocative in blue. Since starting her career, she has worked as a popular musician in New York City and then moved to Los Angeles, where she was recognized on late night television as the house drummer for “The Arsenio Hall. Show “and Quincy Jones. ‘VIBE TV’ program, hosted by Sinbad. To date, Carrington has performed on over a hundred recordings and has been a model and advocate for young women and men internationally through her teaching and touring careers. She has worked extensively with jazz giants and legends including Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, Al Jarreau, Stan Getz, Woody Shaw, Clark Terry, Cassandra Wilson, Dianne Reeves, James Moody, Joe Sample, Esperanza Spalding, and more. . For more information on Terri Lyne Carrington, visit terrilynecarrington.com.

“There is so much excitement and anticipation around the Jazz Music Awards,” said Williams. “I have always known that Terri Lyne is an incredible talent and a very accomplished drummer, composer and educator. The more I remove the layers, I am fascinated that she has covered so much territory in her career. She is also a much sought-after Music Director for prestigious large-scale jazz and musical productions around the world. And we all know she’s performed with and directed some of the best and that’s why she’s perfect for our inaugural awards show.

As a presenter of live jazz shows over the years, sold out at some of Atlanta’s biggest concert halls and hosting annual benefit shows, WCLK began presenting artists with its Jazz Legacy. Award. In recent years, Williams has noticed, as he travels the musical landscape, that there is a dearth of large award ceremonies honoring the creativity and work of one of the earliest forms of indigenous musical art in America: jazz. Much like Williams, the Linton program director, and her team began to think about hosting a bigger celebration of jazz, COVID-19 has put all performances on hiatus. “These musicians were sidelined for a year and a half, and the audience missed something,” she says. “I felt we should come back big. “

Additionally, Williams says, the event will include an educational component on the Clark University Atlanta campus, as well as a black-tie awards gala at the Cobb Center on Friday, October 21, 2022, the day before the awards ceremony. prices. Friday’s program will feature interactive sessions from world-renowned experts in the field of jazz, and classes will also include small-group workshops led by leading creators from the music and performing arts industries for students. high school and college students as well as the public.

“Participants will be able to learn and glean something that is happening in the jazz music industry from some of the best,” says Williams. “So we want to make it a stimulating and spectacular weekend that uplifts and promotes this music. “As soon as COVID was lifted, you saw artists on the road again and jazz festivals were back. Now, it’s a collective way to have them all on one stage loved, to be celebrated the same way we see it at other music awards shows. We need to.

For more information and updates on the Jazz Music Awards and Jazz 91.9 WCLK, visit: wclk.com.


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Jazz Music Awards set to launch in 2022 – Billboard https://jazzfin.com/jazz-music-awards-set-to-launch-in-2022-billboard/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/jazz-music-awards-set-to-launch-in-2022-billboard/ Rushion McDonald, who produced the Steve harvey The daytime talk show from 2012 to 2017, will spearhead the production of the inaugural Jazz Music Awards: Celebrating the Spirit of Jazz on October 22, 2022 at the Cobb Energy Performing Arts Center in Atlanta. To explore See the latest videos, graphics and news Presented by Jazz […]]]>

Rushion McDonald, who produced the Steve harvey The daytime talk show from 2012 to 2017, will spearhead the production of the inaugural Jazz Music Awards: Celebrating the Spirit of Jazz on October 22, 2022 at the Cobb Energy Performing Arts Center in Atlanta.

To explore

See the latest videos, graphics and news

Presented by Jazz 91.9 WCLK, the Jazz Music Awards recognize “a wide range of creators from the world of national and international jazz, traditional and contemporary musicians, singers and major groups, to composers, to individual songs and to complete albums”. according to a statement from the station.

WCLK’s program director David Linton approached McDonald’s with the task of running the show. In addition to producing the awards ceremony, McDonald’s 3815 Media is set to host the ceremony red carpet event as well as the show’s global live broadcast.

Jazz musician and three-time Grammy winner Terri Lyne Carrington is expected to lead the show’s musical direction and act as a consultant. Carrington won two Grammys for Best Vocal Jazz Album (The mosaic project, 2011, and Beautiful life, 2014) and one for best jazz instrumental album (Money Jungle: Provocative in blue, 2013). In addition, Carrington is on the Board of Directors of the Recording Academy.

The categories for the next awards show include best mainstream artist, best contemporary artist, best duo, group or big band, best new jazz artist (contemporary or mainstream), best jazz singer, best international artist (contemporary or general public), the best general public album. , best contemporary album, jazz innovator of the year, composer of the year, educator of the year, jazz heritage award and song of the year voted by fans.

Ahead of the awards ceremony, WCLK is expected to host an on-campus event for students at Clark Atlanta University, a historically black college and university. The program will include interactive learning sessions between students and top jazz musicians.

“As soon as COVID was lifted you saw the performers on the road again and the jazz festivals were back,” said Wendy Williams, who has worked at the station for 27 years and is currently managing director of WCLK. “Now it’s a collective way to have them all on one stage loved, celebrated the same way we see it at other music awards shows. We need to.

The WCLK Jazz Awards are just one of the awards show that honors top talent in the genre. Other notable jazz awards include the BBC Jazz Awards, NEA Jazz Masters, and the Mary Lou Williams Women in Jazz Awards.

The submission window is from January 1 to March 31, 2022. Visit wclk.com to learn more.


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Pat Martino: one of the best jazz guitarists https://jazzfin.com/pat-martino-one-of-the-best-jazz-guitarists/ https://jazzfin.com/pat-martino-one-of-the-best-jazz-guitarists/#respond Wed, 10 Nov 2021 00:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/pat-martino-one-of-the-best-jazz-guitarists/ At the age of 35, when Pat Martino learned he might only have a few hours to live, he was already considered one of the best jazz guitarists. He had developed an elegant and fluid style modeled on guitarist Wes Montgomery, having started touring as a teenager, and became known for his toned lines, freewheeling […]]]>

At the age of 35, when Pat Martino learned he might only have a few hours to live, he was already considered one of the best jazz guitarists. He had developed an elegant and fluid style modeled on guitarist Wes Montgomery, having started touring as a teenager, and became known for his toned lines, freewheeling harmonies and dexterity on the neck.

But as Martino recorded his first dozen albums, moving from hard bop to soul, blues and oriental music, he also began to experience mysterious headaches and seizures. When he suffered a near-fatal brain aneurysm in 1980, doctors finally diagnosed what was wrong, locating a tangle of veins and arteries that had impaired blood flow to his brain.

He was told he needed immediate surgery, he flew from Los Angeles to his hometown of Philadelphia, where surgeons removed a blood clot along with part of his left temporal lobe. He woke up in a cloud – he felt like he had been “dropped cold, empty, neutral, cleansed,” as he later put it – with retrograde amnesia. He barely recognized his parents and had no memory of his name, let alone his musical career.

“I had no interest in music,” Martino remembers, “no muscular memory of playing guitar.”

But while listening to records and hearing friends play the instrument, he slowly started playing again, leading to an astonishing second act in which he recorded albums that rivaled his old records in elegance and creativity. He remained a dynamic force in jazz, even though he faced lingering health issues, continuing to occur until lung disease forced him to retire in 2018.

“Every time you thought he was away he would come back,” said his manager, Joseph Donofrio. “He was fierce in his music and his integrity. It was only his music, his guitar, his heritage.

Martino was 77 when he died on Monday, in the same Philadelphia townhouse where he had spent part of his childhood.

From his early years as a conductor, Martino had sought to push his sound in adventurous new directions, moving from organ-tinged soul jazz to psychedelic fusion. His fourth album, Baiyina (The clear proof), included Indian instruments such as the tamboura and tabla, and was captioned “A Psychedelic Excursion Through the Magical Mysteries of the Qur’an”.

Martino then released an instrumental version of the pop song “Sunny”, which has become a staple of his live shows, and has shown a tender side on albums such as We will be together again (1976), a collection of duets with pianist Gil Goldstein which included a performance of “Send in the Clowns” by Stephen Sondheim.

He received four Grammy nominations, including for the 2003 album Thinking group, recorded with famous musicians such as pianist Gonzalo Rubalcaba, saxophonist Joe Lovano, bassist Christian McBride and drummer Lewis Nash. “He created his own language on the guitar,” banjo player Bela Fleck wrote in the cover notes. “He walks among us but by different paths. “

Pat Martino in concert at the Newport Jazz Festival in August 2015

(AFP / Getty)

Martino seemed to be so acclaimed in part because he was building on the bebop tradition while polishing the conventions. “He starts a line at an unexpected pace, pauses runs to emphasize a single note or riff, inserts odd-length jumps into standard licks, and shifts accents around the beat.” New York Times music critic Jon Pareles once wrote. “His playing is clearly capricious, approaching the tunes from strange angles and taking rewarding tangents; it makes the shapes of the songs seem slippery and mysterious.

After Martino’s brain surgery, his willingness to experiment only seemed to increase. He studied world music, drawing inspiration from Chinese and Japanese scales, and tinkered with digital tools, using an electronic orchestra to create lush pieces backed by pianos, strings and timpani – irritating his longtime label. , Muse, when he refused to include a guitar.

Martino professed not to care. “So many things have vaporized in my life,” he said. The New York Times in 1995, “I ask, ‘Why am I alive?’ I don’t need to be competitive. I have reached a point where I am looking for no other pedestal than the ground on which I am walking.

Patrick Carmen Azzara was born in Philadelphia on August 25, 1944. His mother was a housewife and his father was a tailor who sang in local clubs – using the stage name Martino, which prompted his son to do the same – and who briefly took guitar lessons from jazz legend Eddie Lang.

As Martino has recounted, his father lured him into music using a bit of reverse psychology, forbidding him to touch a guitar tucked away under the bed. He started playing at the age of 12 and, as he said, launched a career in music aimed at making his father proud.

Martino said his muscle memory came back in bits and pieces as he recovered several of his old techniques

(Public domain)

After dropping out of school at age 15, he toured with R&B singer Lloyd Price and moved to Harlem, immersing himself in the neighborhood’s soul jazz scene. He performed with saxophonist Willis “Gator” Jackson, replaced George Benson in organist Jack McDuff’s band and recorded his first album, El Hombre (1967), at the age of 22.

In less than a decade, he suffered from severe epileptic seizures, notably during a performance in front of a crowd of over 200,000 people at the Riviera Jazz Festival in France. He took a break from touring and taught music in Hollywood while trying to find out what was wrong with his health. Doctors diagnosed him with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, which prompted him to receive electroconvulsive treatment before being treated for an arteriovenous malformation in the brain.

His recovery was slow and he was marked by his old records, which his father played for him while Martino recovered in the family home. “I lay in my upstairs bed and heard them seep through the walls and floor, a reminder of something I had no idea what I was meant to be, or that I was never have been, “he recalls in an autobiography, Here and now! (2011), co-authored with Bill Milkowski.

Martino said his muscle memory came back in bits and pieces as he recovered many of his old techniques. He started playing again after two years and released a comeback album, The return (1987), only to take a break when his parents fell ill and died within a year of each other. He fell into depression and faced additional health issues, including emphysema, before returning to the studio to record two albums in six months. Exchange (1994) and The manufacturer (1995).

His other records included All sides now (1997), in which he teamed up with revered guitarists such as Les Paul and Joe Satriani; Undeniable (2011), recorded live at Blues Alley in Washington; and Formidable (2017), his latest band-leading record, which featured two members of his longtime trio, organist Pat Bianchi and drummer Carmen Intorre Jr.

Survivors include his 26-year-old wife, previously Ayako Asahi.

Martino was the subject of a documentary in 2008, Martino without rope, who reviewed her recovery from brain surgery. One scene showed him looking at images of his brain, where a black spot marked the missing 70% of his left temporal lobe, according to an account in Nautilus magazine. He had lost almost all of his memories, he noted, as well as a critical look at life.

“I would say what is missing is the disappointment, the criticism, the judgment of others – what is missing are all the dilemmas that made life so difficult,” he said in the film. “This is what is missing. And to be honest with you, it’s beneficial.

© The Washington Post


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Composer Brian Field produces political satire with “Let’s Build a Wall!” “ https://jazzfin.com/composer-brian-field-produces-political-satire-with-lets-build-a-wall/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 12:35:18 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/composer-brian-field-produces-political-satire-with-lets-build-a-wall/ With styles of Broadway musical theater, Brian Champ raises political extremism on both sides of the spectrum with his last job Composer Brian Champ wrote an American political satire with his recent work ‘Let’s build a wall!‘ for tenor and chamber ensemble, in a style that nods to the tradition of musical theater. The play […]]]>

With styles of Broadway musical theater, Brian Champ raises political extremism on both sides of the spectrum with his last job

Composer Brian Champ wrote an American political satire with his recent work Let’s build a wall!for tenor and chamber ensemble, in a style that nods to the tradition of musical theater. The play pokes fun at both sides of the political landscape in the United States. On the one hand, we hear extreme xenophobia and historical myopia on the right, and exaggerated liberalism and lack of skepticism on the left. The field oscillates between narrative points of view, always in a humorous vein. The voice of tenor Zoli Mujahid, who was a Eurovision finalist, is lovely in this setting.

Let’s build a wall!recently won first place as well as the Audience Award from the Royal Sound Music Competition and a Platinum Award from the LIT Talent Awards.

Compositionally, Field was influenced by post-Romanticism, jazz, and, clearly from this play, the tradition of American musical theater.

Field has already received numerous awards, including the NMR Classic Recording Award; the registration price of the Benenti Foundation; the Mullord Prize of the Alvarez Chamber Orchestra; First Prize, Briar Cliff Choral Music Competition; and First Prize, Victor Herbert ASCAP Young Composers Competition.

Brian Champ began piano studies at age eight and began composing at age sixteen, eventually studying composition at Connecticut College, with advanced degrees in composition at the Juilliard School and Columbia University.

Other recent Fields compositions are ‘A Christmas Carol’, ‘Fire’ and ‘Tres Canciones De Amor’ which can be found on the Spotify and Sound cloud platforms. To learn more about this fantastic classical artist, you can visit his website, Facebook as good as Wikipedia pages.

Check out the song on Spotify:

https://open.spotify.com/track/6A9YyxKmvkPPvVeph6gEBY


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Baku Academy of Music holds conference on jazz music [PHOTO] https://jazzfin.com/baku-academy-of-music-holds-conference-on-jazz-music-photo/ Wed, 03 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/baku-academy-of-music-holds-conference-on-jazz-music-photo/ November 3, 2021 11:50 am (UTC + 04:00 am) 1,327 By Laman Ismayilova The Baku Academy of Music (BMA) organized a scientific and creative conference as part of the Jazzery Voices project. The rector of the Baku Academy of Music, folk artist Farhad Badalbeyli, welcomed the conference participants, Azertag reported. Musicologist Natavan Huseynova (Netherlands) and […]]]>

November 3, 2021 11:50 am (UTC + 04:00 am)

1,327

By Laman Ismayilova

The Baku Academy of Music (BMA) organized a scientific and creative conference as part of the Jazzery Voices project.

The rector of the Baku Academy of Music, folk artist Farhad Badalbeyli, welcomed the conference participants, Azertag reported.

Musicologist Natavan Huseynova (Netherlands) and jazz musician Irina Ebralidze (Georgia) virtually joined the meeting.

Badalbeyli praised the Jazzery Voices project, noting the latest achievements of acclaimed jazz musicians Emin Afrasiyab, Isfar Sarabski, Etibar Asadli and others.

Irina Ebralidze discussed some aspects of vocal jazz studies, while Natavan Huseynova gave an overview of Azerbaijani jazz in the first half of the 20th century.

Then the professor of Baku Academy of Music, Doctor of Philosophy in Art History, Lala Rzayeva, presented a report on “jazz pianism”, while Doctor of Philosophy in Art History Aybaniz Novrasli discussed Azerbaijani ethno-jazz trends.

Musicologist, publicist, actress Fariza Babayeva reported on the problems of Azerbaijani jazz art, Baku Academy of Music graduate Jamila Amirova spoke about modern Azerbaijani jazz pianists, doctor of philosophy in history of the art, jazz researcher Turan Mammadliyeva discussed some issues of jazz management in Azerbaijan.

The conference was followed by a performance by international jazz festival winner Elbay Mammadzade. The musician performed a musical piece “Illustration”.

In particular, the Jazzery Voices project offers concerts by professional and young jazz musicians, a conference, a research seminar, master classes and much more.

Initiated by the Ministry of Culture, the large-scale project is scheduled for the 100th centenary of the Baku Academy of Music.

For many years, BMA has successfully promoted the rich cultural heritage of Azerbaijan. Since its inception, the Baku Academy of Music has trained many generations of world-famous musicians.

With a rich history spanning 100 years, Baku Academy of Music provides high quality education to many young talents.

Since 1991, the eminent pianist and composer Farhad Badalbeyli has been Rector of the Baku Academy of Music.

The Academy also organizes a number of concerts with the participation of world-famous musicians.

Meanwhile, the final “Jazz Said Victory” concert will be held at the International Mugham Center on November 6th.

Follow us on twitter @AzerNewsAz



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How the War Spread Jazz Music: A Tribute to Louis Armstrong at the WWII Museum https://jazzfin.com/how-the-war-spread-jazz-music-a-tribute-to-louis-armstrong-at-the-wwii-museum/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/how-the-war-spread-jazz-music-a-tribute-to-louis-armstrong-at-the-wwii-museum/ NEW ORLEANS (WGNO) – The history of modern music and jazz is considerable. The National World War II Museum presents a new live musical tribute that honors the influence of New Orleans jazz and the legacy of Louis Armstrong titled: Swing that Music, a Tribute to Louis Armstrong. Jazz is the product of many. It […]]]>

NEW ORLEANS (WGNO) – The history of modern music and jazz is considerable. The National World War II Museum presents a new live musical tribute that honors the influence of New Orleans jazz and the legacy of Louis Armstrong titled: Swing that Music, a Tribute to Louis Armstrong.

Jazz is the product of many. It is also a product of enslaved Africans and free colored Creoles interacting musically in New Orleans, Louisiana, before the Civil War.

In 1941, the United States entered World War II. When American soldiers entered Europe and Asia, so did American music.

Wendell Brunious is a renowned group leader and trumpeter and leads the group in the tune for the WWII Museum’s tribute to Louis Armstrong. Brunious thinks it was the dotted eighth note, followed by a sixteenth note that rocked jazz around the world, saying, “That’s the main thing, the swing!” Boo be doo uh, Boo be doo uh uh. This thing only speaks to your soul, regardless of your nationality! “

Tom Hook is an accomplished conductor and pianist and quite a historian, saying, “Jazz is the ultimate expression of the American spirit. He was transferred because of the first two world wars. During World War I, the Department of the Navy closed Storyville in New Orleans because so many soldiers heading to France were arriving through New Orleans with something they did not have. This was where jazz was located and played, in Storyville. That music then had to move to another location and a lot of these guys went upstream to Chicago. These musicians and soldiers took this music when they went to Europe in 1917 and beyond and the jazz era began. The original Dixieland jazz group went to Europe when jazz was popular in 1917 and performed for the Queen of England. Musicians began to spread this new sound around the world, following the First World War. During World War II, the US military recorded V records which were sent to the troops as moral stimulants.

By the 1940s jazz had taken off, with big bands providing the festive music of the country, and few could lead a group with as much character as Louis Armstrong.

Wendell Brunious knows all styles of jazz and the traditional New Orleans jazz style. Brunious has the honor of musically representing Louis Armstrong during the show. “When you try to do Louis’ stuff, the first thing you learn is that you can’t do it. It is such an honor to pay tribute to him because he is number one, ”says Brunious.

The world wars played a crucial role in the spread of jazz. Jazz was born in New Orleans. The National WWII Museum resides in New Orleans.

Swing That Music: A Tribute to Louis Armstrong, takes place at the Stage Door Canteen of the BB museum.

Tom Hook says the musicians in the show have a responsibility to have a good time, tell the story of Louis Armstrong, and introduce young people to jazz music.

“We talk a lot on the Louis Armstrong Impact show. We’re trying to get the message out of who he was and his importance, not just to New Orleans, but to American culture in general, ”says Hook.

One of the songs the tribute group will perform is called Azalea. It is sentimental music between the pianist and the trumpet.

“Duke Ellington wrote this song and then gave the music to Louis Armstrong. Armstrong made an interpretation of it. It is believed that at the end of the recording Duke Ellington laid his head on the piano and cried. Louis Armstrong had given so much to this song that Duke had written. It’s pretty much the greatest tribute you can get, ”says Brunious.

The first Louis Armstrong tribute jazz performance takes place at the National WWII Museum on October 22. To purchase tickets, click here.


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Album review: ‘Love for Sale’ shines a light on thrill of jazz music, the end of Tony Bennett’s groundbreaking jazz career https://jazzfin.com/album-review-love-for-sale-shines-a-light-on-thrill-of-jazz-music-the-end-of-tony-bennetts-groundbreaking-jazz-career/ https://jazzfin.com/album-review-love-for-sale-shines-a-light-on-thrill-of-jazz-music-the-end-of-tony-bennetts-groundbreaking-jazz-career/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/album-review-love-for-sale-shines-a-light-on-thrill-of-jazz-music-the-end-of-tony-bennetts-groundbreaking-jazz-career/ This isn’t the first time Lady Gaga and Tony Bennett have come together to revive the classic sound of jazz music. The duo released their album, Cheek to cheek, in 2014 and have been inseparable ever since. Seven years later Love for sale focuses on the iconic music of Cole Porter. It serves as the […]]]>

This isn’t the first time Lady Gaga and Tony Bennett have come together to revive the classic sound of jazz music. The duo released their album, Cheek to cheek, in 2014 and have been inseparable ever since. Seven years later Love for sale focuses on the iconic music of Cole Porter. It serves as the perfect follow-up to the collaborators’ debut album and reminds listeners of the true beauty of jazz jazz.

Sadly, this album marks the end of Bennett’s decades of career after being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2017. The jazz singer let Gaga take charge of the entire recording process, encouraging her to sing solo. on some tracks. In an interview with Apple Music, Gaga said, “Tony gave me the inspiration and permission to court again in the studio. He reminded me that I am the artist.

Love for sale is a reminder of the close bond Gaga and Bennett share and you can feel it in every song as they laugh and take moments to talk to each other. Compared to the dark and serious nature of Cheek to cheek, the last album is vibrant and whimsical.

The opening of the album “It’s De-Lovely” is a sweet melody that reflects the duo’s vibrant new sound. The opening trumpets that lead to a piano decrescendo and Gaga’s soft voice reflect the happiness evident in her voice as Bennett joins her for the chorus. They sing about the beauty of finding true love and serenity, which might hint at the current friendship of the two.

“Love for Sale”, one of the album’s main singles, describes the epitome of young love. The track emphasizes the ecstasy of falling in love quickly and warns the listener of the consequences that come with it. While not as flashy and punchy as any Gaga cover, it still puts a smile on your face and allows you to rock back and forth, wishing that love would come your way.

In contrast, “Do I Love You” is a flawless love song that serves as Lady Gaga’s solo. It almost feels like she’s only singing for you, as the singer hums about not being able to live without the love of her life and how much she appreciates them. The orchestra playing in the background also makes it a staple in the tracklist.

The upbeat tempo of “I Get A Kick Out Of You” is all about finding solace and attraction in the person you love and not worrying about what other people think when you’re around them. You might want to snap your fingers to this beat as the duo say, “I don’t get any kick from champagne / Mere alcohol doesn’t make me vibrate at all / So tell me, why should this be? true ? Mm, yeah / I like you. The overall sound of the track is infectious and the vocals of Gaga and Bennett complement each other and demonstrate the powerful strength of their vocals.

“You’re The Top” ends the album in style. His return of trumpets and percussion is reminiscent of the courage for which Gaga and Bennett are known. For fans who have followed the duo since their first collaboration together, this is the song for you.

Lady Gaga and Tony Bennett have proven that jazz music can be revived and radiate a lighter, brighter sound. Love for sale has its moments when certain songs lack the brilliance of Cheek to cheek but on the whole, reminds jazz listeners of its dynamism and instrumentation. This does not detract from the value of the album; there are just songs that get repetitive or go on too long. The duo’s growth is evident on every track, but it may not be as noticeable as its predecessor.

Rating: 3/5

@ grace_koe3

gk011320@ohio.edu



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