Jazz singers – Jazz Fin http://jazzfin.com/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 14:16:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jazzfin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-14-150x150.png Jazz singers – Jazz Fin http://jazzfin.com/ 32 32 Musicians Pay Tribute to Iconic Jazz Singers in Malibu https://jazzfin.com/musicians-pay-tribute-to-iconic-jazz-singers-in-malibu/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 09:29:45 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/musicians-pay-tribute-to-iconic-jazz-singers-in-malibu/ Three dynamic female singers and an all-female jazz band pay tribute to three of the greatest jazz singers in history in the musical performance Bessie, Billie and Nina-Pioneering Women in Jazz at Pepperdine University’s Smothers Theater in Malibu on Thursday, March 24, 2022 at 8 p.m. Tickets, priced at $20 for adults and $10 for […]]]>

Three dynamic female singers and an all-female jazz band pay tribute to three of the greatest jazz singers in history in the musical performance Bessie, Billie and Nina-Pioneering Women in Jazz at Pepperdine University’s Smothers Theater in Malibu on Thursday, March 24, 2022 at 8 p.m.

Tickets, priced at $20 for adults and $10 for full-time Pepperdine students, are available now by calling (310) 506-4522 or visiting the event page.

From the Jim Crow-South era to the turbulent 1960s, Bessie Smith, Billie Holiday and Nina Simone were among the most influential and popular singers of their time. Both within their music and outside of clubs and concert halls, they have exercised their exceptional talents to fight against racial prejudice, sexism and poverty. Whether it’s by forcefully and playfully asserting its autonomy (Bessie Smith), by forcing America to recognize the pervasive racism in the American South and beyond (Billie Holiday), or by giving a voice to the movement of civil rights with moving protest anthems (Nina Simone), these pioneering singers spoke to and for those disenfranchised as women, African Americans and artists. All three women challenged social norms, embracing empowerment through their art.

Produced by GRAMMY-winning Eli Wolf (Norah Jones, Cassandra Wilson), and with arrangements by pianist and musical director Carmen Staff (Dee Dee Bridgewater), Bessie, Billie and Nina-Pioneering Women in Jazz features three dynamic singers , each rising star in their own right: Charenée Wade (Jazz at Lincoln Center), Tahira Clayton (co-leader, Women in Jazz Organization) and Vanisha Gould (Sunday Vocal Jazz Jam Series). Presented in affiliation with WIJO and backed by an all-female band, Wade, Gould and Clayton celebrate the lasting legacy of these iconic women and artists with performances of their classic songs, including Bessie Smith’s “Downhearted Blues”, “Strange Fruit” by Billie Holiday. “, and “Mississippi Goddam” by Nina Simone.

The musical and social legacies of Bessie Smith, Billie Holiday and Nina Simone remain more relevant than ever. Their contributions resonate with artists today across many genres, as well as ongoing movements toward progress and equality for women and African Americans. Bessie, Billie and Nina will entertain, inspire and empower audiences during this pivotal time in our own history.

Pepperdine University’s Lisa Smith Wengler Center for the Arts delivers high-quality activities to more than 50,000 people from more than 800 ZIP codes each year through performances, rehearsals, museum exhibits, and masters classes. Located on Pepperdine’s beautiful Malibu campus overlooking the Pacific, the center serves as a hub for the arts, uniquely connecting professional visiting artists with Pepperdine students as well as patrons from surrounding Southern California communities. Facilities include the 450-seat Smothers Theater, the 118-seat Raitt Recital Hall, the Helen E. Lindhurst “black box” theater, and the Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art.

]]>
SV jazz singers take part in the festival – Butler Eagle https://jazzfin.com/sv-jazz-singers-take-part-in-the-festival-butler-eagle/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 15:48:54 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/sv-jazz-singers-take-part-in-the-festival-butler-eagle/ Twenty-nine students from the Seneca Valley Band have been selected by solo audition to perform at the Pennsylvania Music Educators Association (PMEA) District Jazz Festival at Slippery Rock University on February 18-19. The Seneca Valley jazz singers participated in the Pennsylvania Music Educators Association’s District Jazz Festival held last month at Slippery Rock University. A […]]]>

Twenty-nine students from the Seneca Valley Band have been selected by solo audition to perform at the Pennsylvania Music Educators Association (PMEA) District Jazz Festival at Slippery Rock University on February 18-19.

The Seneca Valley jazz singers participated in the Pennsylvania Music Educators Association’s District Jazz Festival held last month at Slippery Rock University.

A district press release says 29 students were selected via solo audition.

The festival was comprised of three jazz ensembles, with Seneca Valley sending the most students of the participating districts.

Guest conductors included Dr. Leigh Pilzer, a Washington DC-based saxophonist and arranger who has toured nationally and internationally as a member of the Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks Orchestra and the DIVA Jazz Orchestra; Dr. David Glover, head of the music department and percussion instructor at Slippery Rock University; and Clint Bleil, freelance saxophonist in the Pittsburgh area and assistant professor of music at Washington and Jefferson College.

Part of this story is shared with you exclusively on digital media. To read the full story and support our local, independent newsroom, please register at butlereagle.com.

Related article: SV jazz singers take part in the festival

]]>
Jazz Singers, Orchestra take the stage on March 9 | Nebraska today https://jazzfin.com/jazz-singers-orchestra-take-the-stage-on-march-9-nebraska-today/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 06:12:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/jazz-singers-orchestra-take-the-stage-on-march-9-nebraska-today/ The Jazz Singers and Jazz Orchestra of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s Glenn Korff School of Music will perform at 7:30 p.m. on March 9 at Kimball Recital Hall. The concert is free and open to the public. It will also be webcast live. The Jazz Singers, under the direction of David von Kampen, lecturer, is […]]]>

The Jazz Singers and Jazz Orchestra of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s Glenn Korff School of Music will perform at 7:30 p.m. on March 9 at Kimball Recital Hall.

The concert is free and open to the public. It will also be webcast live.

The Jazz Singers, under the direction of David von Kampen, lecturer, is a small choir open to all members of the university community by audition. Students are instructed in jazz style, ensemble singing, lyrical delivery, solos, and improvisation.

The Jazz Orchestra, under the direction of Greg Simon, assistant professor of composition, is the university’s showcase jazz organization and one of the most visible performing groups. This versatile set performs all styles of music.

“Jazz Singers explored a wide variety of sources this semester,” von Kampen said. “At this concert, we will sing arrangements of music by Lambert Hendricks and Ross, the Beatles, the Beach Boys and Claude Debussy.

The group currently has six music majors and eight non-majors, many of whom are graduating this spring. They recently performed at the Jazz Education Network Conference in Dallas in January.

“Anyone who loves to sing and wants to explore a diverse and challenging repertoire should come to this concert and consider auditioning in August,” von Kampen said.

The Jazz Orchestra’s programming will celebrate the big band, all that it is today and all that it has been in the past, in a “Creations and BD” program.

“In addition to the music of the great Benny Carter – a legend in big band lore – we play music from some of my favorite new composers,” Simon said. “From ‘Mechanical Men’ inspired by Stephen Harvey’s supervillains to Anna Webber’s ethereal way of using the human voice in ‘Climbing on Mirrors’, these four pieces are brilliant in color and spirit, painting amazing images in music.”

]]>
Male Jazz Singers, Johnny Otis Centennial, Cello Day & Frank Vignola https://jazzfin.com/male-jazz-singers-johnny-otis-centennial-cello-day-frank-vignola/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 15:17:03 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/male-jazz-singers-johnny-otis-centennial-cello-day-frank-vignola/ Monday, December 27 the one tonight Night Train presents this rare bird – the male jazz singer. We’ll hear selections from hitmaker Joe Williams, vocal masters Jon Hendricks (with Kurt Elling) and Eddie Jefferson, soundscapes painter Bobby McFerrin, twisted Bob Dorough, Ben Sidran and Mose Allison, and rising stars Gregory Porter. and Allan Harris. Tuesday […]]]>


Monday, December 27

the one tonight Night Train presents this rare bird – the male jazz singer. We’ll hear selections from hitmaker Joe Williams, vocal masters Jon Hendricks (with Kurt Elling) and Eddie Jefferson, soundscapes painter Bobby McFerrin, twisted Bob Dorough, Ben Sidran and Mose Allison, and rising stars Gregory Porter. and Allan Harris.

Tuesday 28 December

Music tonight on the Night Train comes from guitarist Joe Cohn, piano giant Earl Hines, drummer Ed Thigpen, keyboardist Lonnie Liston Smith, all born on this date. It is also the centenary anniversary of conductor and impresario Johnny Otis with a first hit at the first hour and a special at the second hour.

wednesday 29 december

Night Train joins in Global village and Strange currency to celebrate International Cello Day. We’ll be spotlighting jazz cello in the first hour of Ray Brown, Akua Dixon, Oscar Pettiford, Helen Sung with the Harlem Quartet, David Darling, Indigo Quartet, and Wayne Shorter with a cello ensemble. Then, in the second hour, there is a special concert with Quattro, which also includes the cello in its instrumental programming.

Thursday, December 30

Guitars and drums tonight on the Night Train as we mark the birthdays of drummers Jerry Granelli and Lewis Nash, and guitarists Ron Affif and Frank Vignola (including Vignola in a special concert with the Detroit Hot Club in the second hour of the show). We will also hear new releases from Brazilian guitarist Bola Sete, trumpeter Farnell Newton, singer Samara Joy and pianist Eliane Elias (with Chick Corea).


]]>
UNL Big Band and Jazz Singers perform on Monday | Extra Quarter https://jazzfin.com/unl-big-band-and-jazz-singers-perform-on-monday-extra-quarter/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/unl-big-band-and-jazz-singers-perform-on-monday-extra-quarter/ The UNL Jazz Singers and UNL Jazz Orchestra will perform on October 5 at the Kimball Recital Hall. COURTESY PHOTO BY TAYLOR SULLIVAN The Big Band and jazz singers from the Glenn Korff School of Music will perform on Monday, November 22 at 7:30 p.m. at Kimball Recital Hall, 11th and Rst Streets on the […]]]>







The UNL Jazz Singers and UNL Jazz Orchestra will perform on October 5 at the Kimball Recital Hall.


COURTESY PHOTO BY TAYLOR SULLIVAN


The Big Band and jazz singers from the Glenn Korff School of Music will perform on Monday, November 22 at 7:30 p.m. at Kimball Recital Hall, 11th and Rst Streets on the downtown campus of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

The concert is free and open to the public. It will also be webcast live. Visit https://music.unl.edu/webcasts the day of the performance for the link.

The Jazz Singers, under the direction of Dr David von Kampen, is a small choir, open to all members of the university community by audition. Students learn jazz style, ensemble vocals, lyric delivery, solos, and improvisation.

The Big Band, under the direction of Bryan Canonigo, is part of the jazz curriculum. Through intensive rehearsals and performances, students are encouraged to develop and maintain the fundamental skills necessary to perform a wide variety of repertoires and to engage in the creative process through improvisation.

On Monday, the Jazz Singers will perform new musical arrangements by Malika Tirolien and Paul Simon, a painting to a song by Sarah Jarosz that von Kampen wrote for this group five years ago, and the musician and educator’s brand new arrangement. Julia Dollison. composition “Forward Like So.”

“This will be an unofficial world premiere before we do it in Dallas next month at our national Jazz Education Network conference,” said von Kampen.


]]>
Big Band and Jazz Singers to perform on November 22 | Nebraska today https://jazzfin.com/big-band-and-jazz-singers-to-perform-on-november-22-nebraska-today/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 06:15:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/big-band-and-jazz-singers-to-perform-on-november-22-nebraska-today/ The Big Band and jazz singers from the Glenn Korff School of Music will perform on November 22 at 7:30 p.m. at the Kimball Recital Hall. The concert is free and open to the public. It will also be live webcast. The Jazz Singers, under the direction of David von Kampen, is a small choir, […]]]>


The Big Band and jazz singers from the Glenn Korff School of Music will perform on November 22 at 7:30 p.m. at the Kimball Recital Hall.

The concert is free and open to the public. It will also be live webcast.

The Jazz Singers, under the direction of David von Kampen, is a small choir, open to all members of the university community by audition. Students learn jazz style, ensemble vocals, lyric delivery, solos, and improvisation.

The Big Band, under the direction of Bryan Canonigo, is an essential part of the jazz program. Through intensive rehearsals and performances, students are encouraged to develop and maintain the fundamental skills necessary to perform a wide variety of repertoires and to engage in the creative process through improvisation.

For the performance on November 22, the Jazz Singers will be making new arrangements of music by Malika Tirolien and Paul Simon, a painting to a song by Sarah Jarosz that von Kampen wrote for this group five years ago, and the hallmark of the musician and educator Julia Dollison. new arrangement of his own composition, “Forward Like So”.

“This will be an unofficial world premiere before we do it in Dallas next month at our national Jazz Education Network conference,” said von Kampen.

He also said the band were excited to sing again.

“And we are happy to share the concert with the ONE Big Band, ”he said. “I believe this is the first time we’ve been billed with this set. It should be a great night of jazz and new music.


]]>
Jazz singers Madeleine Peyroux and Paula Cole perform at the Green Music Center – Sonoma State Star https://jazzfin.com/jazz-singers-madeleine-peyroux-and-paula-cole-perform-at-the-green-music-center-sonoma-state-star/ https://jazzfin.com/jazz-singers-madeleine-peyroux-and-paula-cole-perform-at-the-green-music-center-sonoma-state-star/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 00:23:13 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/jazz-singers-madeleine-peyroux-and-paula-cole-perform-at-the-green-music-center-sonoma-state-star/ Madeleine Peyroux and Paula Cole performed together on tour last Thursday at the Green Music Center. Peyroux performed his hit album, “Careless Love”, and Cole performed his record album, “This Fire”. Peyroux performed first, with Andy Ezren on piano, Paul Lewinski on double bass and Graham Hawthorne on drums. Peyroux’s ensemble included “Careless Love” and […]]]>


Madeleine Peyroux and Paula Cole performed together on tour last Thursday at the Green Music Center. Peyroux performed his hit album, “Careless Love”, and Cole performed his record album, “This Fire”.

Peyroux performed first, with Andy Ezren on piano, Paul Lewinski on double bass and Graham Hawthorne on drums. Peyroux’s ensemble included “Careless Love” and his interpretation of “Dance Me to the End of Love”.

Madeleine Peyroux was born in Athens, Georgia, and as a child moved from New York to California before moving to Paris at the age of 15. Peyroux began singing with street artists in the Latin Quarter of Paris. The many universities and higher education institutions located there create a lively atmosphere and increased options for student life in the region, making street performances a common occurrence. She then joined “the lost wandering and blues and jazz band” and went on tour across Europe with them.

Cole’s 1996 album, “This Fire” celebrates its 25th anniversary this year and was part of his performance setlist. For this album performance, Cole was on stage with Ross Gallagher on double bass, Chris Bruce on guitar and Jay Bellarose on drums. Bellarose has been playing with Cole since he was 19.

“It means so much to me that you are all cool and docile so we can be here!” Cole said of the mask warrants for visitors to the Green Music Center. Other sites across the county and state have used similar guidelines to curb the spread of COVID-19.

Paula Cole was raised in Rockport, Massachusetts by her parents Stéphanie and Jim Cole where she fell in love with musical theater. Cole then attended Berklee College of Music where she studied jazz. After graduating, Cole wrote his Grammy-nominated triple song, “Where Have all the Cowboys Gone?” Her song “I Don’t Want to Wait” was used as the theme for the American teen drama show “Dawson’s Creek”. Cole was also on the singing faculty at Berklee College of Music.

“I don’t listen to a lot of jazz but I enjoy it when I can.” says Chad Henry, a third-year transfer student. Like many SSU students, Henry went to the show to write a review for the class. “I have certainly heard some of these songs before and it was really nice to be able to come and see that.”

Peyroux has been described by The New York Times as having a vocal style similar to that of Billie Holliday, Ella Fitzgerald and Edith Piaf. His aforementioned album was also re-released in a deluxe version with live versions of songs recorded at the Vitoria-Gasteiz Jazz Festival in Spain from 2005.

The two singers have toured the United States but ended their tour last week in Los Angeles. Peyroux will begin his “Careless Love Forever” world tour on October 28 in Prague, Czech Republic. Cole has just released his new album “American Quilt” which is available on streaming platforms.

To learn more about upcoming GMC events, visit the GMC website.


]]>
https://jazzfin.com/jazz-singers-madeleine-peyroux-and-paula-cole-perform-at-the-green-music-center-sonoma-state-star/feed/ 0
Jazz Singers and Jazz Orchestra will perform on October 5th | Nebraska today https://jazzfin.com/jazz-singers-and-jazz-orchestra-will-perform-on-october-5th-nebraska-today/ https://jazzfin.com/jazz-singers-and-jazz-orchestra-will-perform-on-october-5th-nebraska-today/#respond Tue, 28 Sep 2021 05:13:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/jazz-singers-and-jazz-orchestra-will-perform-on-october-5th-nebraska-today/ Jazz singers and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Jazz Orchestra will perform at 7:30 p.m. on October 5 at Kimball Recital Hall. The Jazz Singers, under the direction of David von Kampen, is a small choir open (via audition) to all members of the university community. Students learn jazz style, ensemble vocals, lyric delivery, solos, and […]]]>


Jazz singers and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Jazz Orchestra will perform at 7:30 p.m. on October 5 at Kimball Recital Hall.

The Jazz Singers, under the direction of David von Kampen, is a small choir open (via audition) to all members of the university community. Students learn jazz style, ensemble vocals, lyric delivery, solos, and improvisation. The ensemble performs standard and contemporary jazz repertoire arrangements in collaboration with a rhythm section.

Their program includes “Twisted” by Wardell Gray and Annie Ross, arranged by von Kampen; “Otoño” by Vince Mendoza, arranged by von Kampen; “The Valley” by Ethan Gruska, arranged by von Kampen; and “Murder by Numbers” by Gordon Sumner and Andy Summers, arranged by Kerry Marsh.

“I hope people are excited to come out and hear live music again,” said von Kampen. “I know that all students are really keen to share songs directly with an audience. I am especially delighted that the band presents a brand new arrangement of the “Twisted” painting. It’s a piece composed by bebop saxophonist Wardell Gray, with lyrics by Annie Ross (of the legendary vocal jazz band Lambert, Hendricks and Ross). Our arrangement is very faithful to both Gray’s original instrumental recording and the LHR adaptation. This is an opportunity for the singers to immerse themselves in the heavy and linear language of bebop, and also to improvise a little.

The Jazz Orchestra, under the direction of Greg Simon, is the university’s showcase jazz organization and one of the most prominent groups at the Glenn Korff School of Music.

Their program includes “Facing East” by Marcus Lewis; Thad Jones’ 61st and Rich’it; Pasar el Tiempo, Aunque Fugaz, Contigo ”by Edward Perez; Louie Bellson’s “Deliverance”, arranged by Bill Holman; and “Le Ravin” by Erica Seguine.

“It’s so exciting to be able to play with a live audience again. Jazz is a community art form, and there’s nothing quite like sharing it with a group of people in the same room as the musicians, ”said Simon. “There are a lot of highlights in this program, but maybe one of my favorites is ‘Pasar El Tiempo, Aunque Fugaz, Contigo’ (‘To spend a moment, however brief, with you’ ) by Edward Perez. Edward is an incredible bassist and songwriter who performs and writes for the Terraza Big Band in New York. He is part of a community of New York-based composers (one of whom, Erica Seguine, is also on our program) who are finding new ways for the big band to sound, perform and find new audiences. . This whole program is a showcase of how jazz developed, even during COVID, and an outline of the directions it might take.

Tickets are $ 5 general admission and $ 3 student / senior, available at the door. The concert will also be webcast live, with details announced. here the day of the performance.


]]>
https://jazzfin.com/jazz-singers-and-jazz-orchestra-will-perform-on-october-5th-nebraska-today/feed/ 0
The best jazz singers of all time – classical music https://jazzfin.com/the-best-jazz-singers-of-all-time-classical-music/ https://jazzfin.com/the-best-jazz-singers-of-all-time-classical-music/#respond Thu, 05 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/the-best-jazz-singers-of-all-time-classical-music/ Armstrong’s unique scat voice brought a new dimension to improvisation: a track like ‘Heebie Jeebies’ seems an outpouring of pure joy, a song that doesn’t need words to convey its rhythmic, melodic enthusiasm. And on the magnificent ‘West End Blues’, his trumpet and vocal power combine to produce a masterpiece of searing emotion. Unsurprisingly, we […]]]>


Armstrong’s unique scat voice brought a new dimension to improvisation: a track like ‘Heebie Jeebies’ seems an outpouring of pure joy, a song that doesn’t need words to convey its rhythmic, melodic enthusiasm. And on the magnificent ‘West End Blues’, his trumpet and vocal power combine to produce a masterpiece of searing emotion.

Unsurprisingly, we also named Louis Armstrong one of the best jazz trumpeters of all time.

Calloway cabin

Photo by Michael Ochs Archives / Getty Images2

Yesnger, dancer, jive talker and dresser, Cab Calloway was a real Jazz master of celebrations. His exuberant personality has eclipsed his reputation as the leader of one of the best bands of the swing era. During the 1930s and 1940s, the Calloway Orchestra accompanied his outrageous vocal displays and boasted an array of talents: tenorist Chu Berry, drummer Cozy Cole, bassist Milt Hinton and trumpeters Jonah Jones and bebop enfant terrible Gillespie dizzy.

Betty carter

Betty carter

Photo by Paul Bergen / Redferns

The title Betty Carter gave to one of her latest CDs embodied her approach to jazz singing: It’s not about the melody. For more than half a century, she has transformed standard popular songs into vehicles for her unique personal expression.

A live performance by Carter embraced joyful innocence, overwhelming insight, and musical virtuosity, both on the part of the singer and the young accompanists. In a Verve Finest Hour compilation it infuses its rhythm section with energy and invention as if it were a horn, a living reproach to those irreducible who secretly feel that the expression ‘jazz singer’ is a contradiction. But Betty Carter was a musician who sang by chance, a jazz voice whose accomplishments continue to amaze.

Darling flower

Darling flower

Photo by David Redfern / Redferns

When Blossom Dearie died, the obituaries began by stating that it was her first name. It seemed too good to be true, the alluring image suited so perfectly the doll-shaped delivery that had made it a unique presence on the international stage for over half a century.

Dearie’s personal territory was the jazz-cabaret frontier, a skillful blend of delicate swing and wit. As her fellow musicians well knew, she was a collector and connoisseur of good tunes, relishing intelligent lyrics and chord changes, which she projected with subtlety, insight and humor.

Kurt Elling

Kurt Elling

Kurt Elling performs at Ronnie Scott’s as part of the London Jazz Festival (Photo by David Redfern / Redferns)

THElistening to Kurt Elling reminds me of the essential paradox of jazz – that it is art music whose purpose has been to sell alcohol. This is especially true of jazz vocals, that vague crossover zone in which hip artists sing standards with a bit of beat, indulge in a taste for sassy subversion or throw shooby-dooing scats. While this kind of amiable entertainment can keep customers happy, it’s not how Kurt Elling sees jazz. Intense, passionate, fearlessly ambitious, his vocal style spans the gamut of his imagination, from searing ballads and improvisations to his own vocal arrangements of classic instrumental solos, like the epic “Resolution” by John Coltrane.

Ella Fitzgerald

Ella Fitzgerald

Photo by William Gottlieb / Redferns

Besides its contagious way with pop songs, Ella Fitzgerald revealed the kind of full-blown improvisational skill that was generally the domain of instrumentalists.
Her power as a scat singer exploded from her 1945 recording of “Flying Home”, and “Smooth Sailing” from 1951 showed her at home in rhythm and blues. Records like these make you understand why she was Norman Granz’s brightest jazz star on the Philharmonic tours, and the one to close the show.

Jazz fans loved Ella’s live performance, supported only by a rhythm section, storming impromptu masterpieces such as “Mack the Knife” and “How High the Moon”, recorded during the event. ‘a 1960 concert in Berlin. We are speechless at his energy, his invention and his exhilarating creativity; his songs dedicate a life committed to performance and the belief that joy is the essence of jazz.

Billie Vacation

Billie Vacation

Photo by Michael Ochs Archives / Getty Images

BiIllie Holiday was a genius improviser. Her ability to give an ordinary pop tune a subtle new form and depth of meaning makes her the most elusive of all beings, a true jazz singer.

It remains, quite possibly, the best. His early 1930s records are still a benchmark for jazz singers. In them, Lady Day is the peer of the star actors around her – foremost among them her soul mate, the tenorman Lester Young. Together, she and Young shoot wonders as their impromptu duet on ‘Me, Myself and I’, which Holiday kicks off with a clever quote from her main influence, Louis Armstrong. But her phrasing, swing and confidence are hers, as in her assured entry on ‘Miss Brown to You’, slippery to the beat, but clear as a bell.

lead belly

flat belly

Regular Huddie Ledbetter, known as the “Leadbelly”. was not: born in rural Texas around 1888, majestic and strong as an ox, he claimed to be the world’s greatest cotton picker, trainer, lover, drinker and guitarist. His pride was matched by a temper and disposition to violence, which earned him prison terms for assault and murder. And it was in 1933, at the Louisiana State Penitentiary, that he was discovered by folk song collectors John and Alan Lomax. Under the sponsorship of the Lomaxes, Leadbelly began his rise to stardom, benefiting from the growing vogue for traditional jazz and wild authenticity. He gave concerts across the United States and Europe, dying in New York City in 1949.

We also named Leadbelly one of the best jazz guitarists of all time.

Bobby McFerrin

Bobby McFerrin

Photo by Chris Weeks / WireImage)

This It was Emma Kirkby who first introduced me to Bobby McFerrin: she said in a radio interview that he had “the most incredible voice I have ever heard”, and as proof played “I ‘m My Own Walkman’. My McFerrin Epiphany followed soon after in a 90-minute live solo concert where her only accessories were a wireless mic and a water bottle. ‘Amazing’ barely described it: a four octave scale from basso deptho to falsetto; seemingly limitless inspiration, energy and spirit; a throbbing throb that came from the singer’s banged chest and rhythmic gasps; dazzling improvisations in which his bebop flights were accompanied by riffs from the public that he dictated on the spot.

Jimmy rushes

Jimmy rushes

Photo by Michael Ochs Archives / Getty Images

NoThere aren’t many singers who inspire their own signature song, but Jimmy Rushing was the unmistakable role model for “Mr Five by Five”. A tribute to his roly-poly frame, the phrase was his nickname throughout his 50-year career and reflected his always good-humored style. He wasn’t cut out for tragedy, and his strength as a singer was contagious and gritty insurance. Although identified with the blues, he sang all kinds of songs, starting in his hometown of Oklahoma City, touring as a traveling artist and ending in the Kansas City precinct, where he joined the Count Basie group in 1935.

Bessie smith

Bessie smith

Photo by Frank Driggs Collection / Getty Images

HHistorically, you can’t have jazz without the Blues. To savor the essence of the blues, any listener must experience the majesty of Bessie Smith. Her first recording, in 1923, established her as a unique singer, with enormous sound and haunting presence. She maintained her eminence throughout the 1920s, her repertoire encompassing pop songs and novelties as well as her basic blues.

His genius for expression was forged over a lifetime of stage performances. A Smith show could seem almost religious, with the crowd moaning and shouting “Amen.” But his appeal was also sexual: a favorite trick was to “walk one”, singing directly to a male member of the audience until he stumbled like a trance towards the stage.

Sarah vaughan

Sarah Vaughan

Photo by Bob Parent / Getty Images

A true jazz diva, Sarah vaughan captivated listeners by its pure sonic beauty and its inventive flexibility. His blend of sensual tone and technical mastery has earned him the public nickname “The Divine One”; her fellow musicians, impressed by her confidence, nicknamed her “Sassy”.

A talented pianist and singer, she grew up with the bebop pioneers, recording with Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker, who admired her deeply. But from the 1950s on, his sumptuous voice, with its four-octave range and opera agility, caught the attention of the pop industry. For much of her career, she veered between the two worlds, earning an intermediate suite for albums of dreamy ballads with strings, while charming jazz fans with her swing and artful phrasing.


]]>
https://jazzfin.com/the-best-jazz-singers-of-all-time-classical-music/feed/ 0
Big Band and Jazz Singers will perform on April 27 | Nebraska today https://jazzfin.com/big-band-and-jazz-singers-will-perform-on-april-27-nebraska-today/ Tue, 27 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/big-band-and-jazz-singers-will-perform-on-april-27-nebraska-today/ The Big Band and Jazz Singers from the Glenn Korff School of Music will perform at 7:30 p.m. on April 27 at Kimball Recital Hall. The concert is free and open to the public. It will also be webcast live. Visit the Glenn Korff School of Music website on the day of the performance for […]]]>

The Big Band and Jazz Singers from the Glenn Korff School of Music will perform at 7:30 p.m. on April 27 at Kimball Recital Hall.

The concert is free and open to the public. It will also be webcast live. Visit the Glenn Korff School of Music website on the day of the performance for the link.

The Jazz Singers, under the direction of David von Kampen, is a small choir, open to all members of the university community by audition. Students are instructed in jazz style, ensemble singing, lyrical delivery, solos, and improvisation.

Their program will include “Baltimore Oriole” by Hoagy Carmichael and arranged by von Kampen; “Color Theory”, composed and arranged by von Kampen; and “I’m Hip” by Dave Frishberg and Bob Dorough, arranged by Kerry Marsh.

The Big Band, under the direction of Bryan Canonigo, is an essential component of the jazz program. Through intensive rehearsal and performance, students are encouraged to develop and maintain the fundamental skills needed to perform a wide variety of repertoire and to engage in the creative process through improvisation.

“We always like to share the stage with our friends from ONE Big Band,” von Kampen said. “It should be a great jazz night, and I hope people come and listen to it one more time before the summer. It was such a pleasure to sing in front of an audience again this spring.

]]>