Jazz singers – Jazz Fin http://jazzfin.com/ Wed, 20 Oct 2021 03:03:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://jazzfin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-14-150x150.png Jazz singers – Jazz Fin http://jazzfin.com/ 32 32 Jazz singers Madeleine Peyroux and Paula Cole perform at the Green Music Center – Sonoma State Star https://jazzfin.com/jazz-singers-madeleine-peyroux-and-paula-cole-perform-at-the-green-music-center-sonoma-state-star/ https://jazzfin.com/jazz-singers-madeleine-peyroux-and-paula-cole-perform-at-the-green-music-center-sonoma-state-star/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 00:23:13 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/jazz-singers-madeleine-peyroux-and-paula-cole-perform-at-the-green-music-center-sonoma-state-star/ Madeleine Peyroux and Paula Cole performed together on tour last Thursday at the Green Music Center. Peyroux performed his hit album, “Careless Love”, and Cole performed his record album, “This Fire”. Peyroux performed first, with Andy Ezren on piano, Paul Lewinski on double bass and Graham Hawthorne on drums. Peyroux’s ensemble included “Careless Love” and […]]]>

Madeleine Peyroux and Paula Cole performed together on tour last Thursday at the Green Music Center. Peyroux performed his hit album, “Careless Love”, and Cole performed his record album, “This Fire”.

Peyroux performed first, with Andy Ezren on piano, Paul Lewinski on double bass and Graham Hawthorne on drums. Peyroux’s ensemble included “Careless Love” and his interpretation of “Dance Me to the End of Love”.

Madeleine Peyroux was born in Athens, Georgia, and as a child moved from New York to California before moving to Paris at the age of 15. Peyroux began singing with street artists in the Latin Quarter of Paris. The many universities and higher education institutions located there create a lively atmosphere and increased options for student life in the region, making street performances a common occurrence. She then joined “the lost wandering and blues and jazz band” and went on tour across Europe with them.

Cole’s 1996 album, “This Fire” celebrates its 25th anniversary this year and was part of his performance setlist. For this album performance, Cole was on stage with Ross Gallagher on double bass, Chris Bruce on guitar and Jay Bellarose on drums. Bellarose has been playing with Cole since he was 19.

“It means so much to me that you are all cool and docile so we can be here!” Cole said of the mask warrants for visitors to the Green Music Center. Other sites across the county and state have used similar guidelines to curb the spread of COVID-19.

Paula Cole was raised in Rockport, Massachusetts by her parents Stéphanie and Jim Cole where she fell in love with musical theater. Cole then attended Berklee College of Music where she studied jazz. After graduating, Cole wrote his Grammy-nominated triple song, “Where Have all the Cowboys Gone?” Her song “I Don’t Want to Wait” was used as the theme for the American teen drama show “Dawson’s Creek”. Cole was also on the singing faculty at Berklee College of Music.

“I don’t listen to a lot of jazz but I enjoy it when I can.” says Chad Henry, a third-year transfer student. Like many SSU students, Henry went to the show to write a review for the class. “I have certainly heard some of these songs before and it was really nice to be able to come and see that.”

Peyroux has been described by The New York Times as having a vocal style similar to that of Billie Holliday, Ella Fitzgerald and Edith Piaf. His aforementioned album was also re-released in a deluxe version with live versions of songs recorded at the Vitoria-Gasteiz Jazz Festival in Spain from 2005.

The two singers have toured the United States but ended their tour last week in Los Angeles. Peyroux will begin his “Careless Love Forever” world tour on October 28 in Prague, Czech Republic. Cole has just released his new album “American Quilt” which is available on streaming platforms.

To learn more about upcoming GMC events, visit the GMC website.


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Jazz Singers and Jazz Orchestra will perform on October 5th | Nebraska today https://jazzfin.com/jazz-singers-and-jazz-orchestra-will-perform-on-october-5th-nebraska-today/ https://jazzfin.com/jazz-singers-and-jazz-orchestra-will-perform-on-october-5th-nebraska-today/#respond Tue, 28 Sep 2021 05:13:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/jazz-singers-and-jazz-orchestra-will-perform-on-october-5th-nebraska-today/ Jazz singers and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Jazz Orchestra will perform at 7:30 p.m. on October 5 at Kimball Recital Hall. The Jazz Singers, under the direction of David von Kampen, is a small choir open (via audition) to all members of the university community. Students learn jazz style, ensemble vocals, lyric delivery, solos, and […]]]>

Jazz singers and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Jazz Orchestra will perform at 7:30 p.m. on October 5 at Kimball Recital Hall.

The Jazz Singers, under the direction of David von Kampen, is a small choir open (via audition) to all members of the university community. Students learn jazz style, ensemble vocals, lyric delivery, solos, and improvisation. The ensemble performs standard and contemporary jazz repertoire arrangements in collaboration with a rhythm section.

Their program includes “Twisted” by Wardell Gray and Annie Ross, arranged by von Kampen; “Otoño” by Vince Mendoza, arranged by von Kampen; “The Valley” by Ethan Gruska, arranged by von Kampen; and “Murder by Numbers” by Gordon Sumner and Andy Summers, arranged by Kerry Marsh.

“I hope people are excited to come out and hear live music again,” said von Kampen. “I know that all students are really keen to share songs directly with an audience. I am especially delighted that the band presents a brand new arrangement of the “Twisted” painting. It’s a piece composed by bebop saxophonist Wardell Gray, with lyrics by Annie Ross (of the legendary vocal jazz band Lambert, Hendricks and Ross). Our arrangement is very faithful to both Gray’s original instrumental recording and the LHR adaptation. This is an opportunity for the singers to immerse themselves in the heavy and linear language of bebop, and also to improvise a little.

The Jazz Orchestra, under the direction of Greg Simon, is the university’s showcase jazz organization and one of the most prominent groups at the Glenn Korff School of Music.

Their program includes “Facing East” by Marcus Lewis; Thad Jones’ 61st and Rich’it; Pasar el Tiempo, Aunque Fugaz, Contigo ”by Edward Perez; Louie Bellson’s “Deliverance”, arranged by Bill Holman; and “Le Ravin” by Erica Seguine.

“It’s so exciting to be able to play with a live audience again. Jazz is a community art form, and there’s nothing quite like sharing it with a group of people in the same room as the musicians, ”said Simon. “There are a lot of highlights in this program, but maybe one of my favorites is ‘Pasar El Tiempo, Aunque Fugaz, Contigo’ (‘To spend a moment, however brief, with you’ ) by Edward Perez. Edward is an incredible bassist and songwriter who performs and writes for the Terraza Big Band in New York. He is part of a community of New York-based composers (one of whom, Erica Seguine, is also on our program) who are finding new ways for the big band to sound, perform and find new audiences. . This whole program is a showcase of how jazz developed, even during COVID, and an outline of the directions it might take.

Tickets are $ 5 general admission and $ 3 student / senior, available at the door. The concert will also be webcast live, with details announced. here the day of the performance.


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The best jazz singers of all time – classical music https://jazzfin.com/the-best-jazz-singers-of-all-time-classical-music/ https://jazzfin.com/the-best-jazz-singers-of-all-time-classical-music/#respond Thu, 05 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/the-best-jazz-singers-of-all-time-classical-music/ Armstrong’s unique scat voice brought a new dimension to improvisation: a track like ‘Heebie Jeebies’ seems an outpouring of pure joy, a song that doesn’t need words to convey its rhythmic, melodic enthusiasm. And on the magnificent ‘West End Blues’, his trumpet and vocal power combine to produce a masterpiece of searing emotion. Unsurprisingly, we […]]]>

Armstrong’s unique scat voice brought a new dimension to improvisation: a track like ‘Heebie Jeebies’ seems an outpouring of pure joy, a song that doesn’t need words to convey its rhythmic, melodic enthusiasm. And on the magnificent ‘West End Blues’, his trumpet and vocal power combine to produce a masterpiece of searing emotion.

Unsurprisingly, we also named Louis Armstrong one of the best jazz trumpeters of all time.

Calloway cabin

Photo by Michael Ochs Archives / Getty Images2

Yesnger, dancer, jive talker and dresser, Cab Calloway was a real Jazz master of celebrations. His exuberant personality has eclipsed his reputation as the leader of one of the best bands of the swing era. During the 1930s and 1940s, the Calloway Orchestra accompanied his outrageous vocal displays and boasted an array of talents: tenorist Chu Berry, drummer Cozy Cole, bassist Milt Hinton and trumpeters Jonah Jones and bebop enfant terrible Gillespie dizzy.

Betty carter

Betty carter

Photo by Paul Bergen / Redferns

The title Betty Carter gave to one of her latest CDs embodied her approach to jazz singing: It’s not about the melody. For more than half a century, she has transformed standard popular songs into vehicles for her unique personal expression.

A live performance by Carter embraced joyful innocence, overwhelming insight, and musical virtuosity, both on the part of the singer and the young accompanists. In a Verve Finest Hour compilation it infuses its rhythm section with energy and invention as if it were a horn, a living reproach to those irreducible who secretly feel that the expression ‘jazz singer’ is a contradiction. But Betty Carter was a musician who sang by chance, a jazz voice whose accomplishments continue to amaze.

Darling flower

Darling flower

Photo by David Redfern / Redferns

When Blossom Dearie died, the obituaries began by stating that it was her first name. It seemed too good to be true, the alluring image suited so perfectly the doll-shaped delivery that had made it a unique presence on the international stage for over half a century.

Dearie’s personal territory was the jazz-cabaret frontier, a skillful blend of delicate swing and wit. As her fellow musicians well knew, she was a collector and connoisseur of good tunes, relishing intelligent lyrics and chord changes, which she projected with subtlety, insight and humor.

Kurt Elling

Kurt Elling

Kurt Elling performs at Ronnie Scott’s as part of the London Jazz Festival (Photo by David Redfern / Redferns)

THElistening to Kurt Elling reminds me of the essential paradox of jazz – that it is art music whose purpose has been to sell alcohol. This is especially true of jazz vocals, that vague crossover zone in which hip artists sing standards with a bit of beat, indulge in a taste for sassy subversion or throw shooby-dooing scats. While this kind of amiable entertainment can keep customers happy, it’s not how Kurt Elling sees jazz. Intense, passionate, fearlessly ambitious, his vocal style spans the gamut of his imagination, from searing ballads and improvisations to his own vocal arrangements of classic instrumental solos, like the epic “Resolution” by John Coltrane.

Ella Fitzgerald

Ella Fitzgerald

Photo by William Gottlieb / Redferns

Besides its contagious way with pop songs, Ella Fitzgerald revealed the kind of full-blown improvisational skill that was generally the domain of instrumentalists.
Her power as a scat singer exploded from her 1945 recording of “Flying Home”, and “Smooth Sailing” from 1951 showed her at home in rhythm and blues. Records like these make you understand why she was Norman Granz’s brightest jazz star on the Philharmonic tours, and the one to close the show.

Jazz fans loved Ella’s live performance, supported only by a rhythm section, storming impromptu masterpieces such as “Mack the Knife” and “How High the Moon”, recorded during the event. ‘a 1960 concert in Berlin. We are speechless at his energy, his invention and his exhilarating creativity; his songs dedicate a life committed to performance and the belief that joy is the essence of jazz.

Billie Vacation

Billie Vacation

Photo by Michael Ochs Archives / Getty Images

BiIllie Holiday was a genius improviser. Her ability to give an ordinary pop tune a subtle new form and depth of meaning makes her the most elusive of all beings, a true jazz singer.

It remains, quite possibly, the best. His early 1930s records are still a benchmark for jazz singers. In them, Lady Day is the peer of the star actors around her – foremost among them her soul mate, the tenorman Lester Young. Together, she and Young shoot wonders as their impromptu duet on ‘Me, Myself and I’, which Holiday kicks off with a clever quote from her main influence, Louis Armstrong. But her phrasing, swing and confidence are hers, as in her assured entry on ‘Miss Brown to You’, slippery to the beat, but clear as a bell.

lead belly

flat belly

Regular Huddie Ledbetter, known as the “Leadbelly”. was not: born in rural Texas around 1888, majestic and strong as an ox, he claimed to be the world’s greatest cotton picker, trainer, lover, drinker and guitarist. His pride was matched by a temper and disposition to violence, which earned him prison terms for assault and murder. And it was in 1933, at the Louisiana State Penitentiary, that he was discovered by folk song collectors John and Alan Lomax. Under the sponsorship of the Lomaxes, Leadbelly began his rise to stardom, benefiting from the growing vogue for traditional jazz and wild authenticity. He gave concerts across the United States and Europe, dying in New York City in 1949.

We also named Leadbelly one of the best jazz guitarists of all time.

Bobby McFerrin

Bobby McFerrin

Photo by Chris Weeks / WireImage)

This It was Emma Kirkby who first introduced me to Bobby McFerrin: she said in a radio interview that he had “the most incredible voice I have ever heard”, and as proof played “I ‘m My Own Walkman’. My McFerrin Epiphany followed soon after in a 90-minute live solo concert where her only accessories were a wireless mic and a water bottle. ‘Amazing’ barely described it: a four octave scale from basso deptho to falsetto; seemingly limitless inspiration, energy and spirit; a throbbing throb that came from the singer’s banged chest and rhythmic gasps; dazzling improvisations in which his bebop flights were accompanied by riffs from the public that he dictated on the spot.

Jimmy rushes

Jimmy rushes

Photo by Michael Ochs Archives / Getty Images

NoThere aren’t many singers who inspire their own signature song, but Jimmy Rushing was the unmistakable role model for “Mr Five by Five”. A tribute to his roly-poly frame, the phrase was his nickname throughout his 50-year career and reflected his always good-humored style. He wasn’t cut out for tragedy, and his strength as a singer was contagious and gritty insurance. Although identified with the blues, he sang all kinds of songs, starting in his hometown of Oklahoma City, touring as a traveling artist and ending in the Kansas City precinct, where he joined the Count Basie group in 1935.

Bessie smith

Bessie smith

Photo by Frank Driggs Collection / Getty Images

HHistorically, you can’t have jazz without the Blues. To savor the essence of the blues, any listener must experience the majesty of Bessie Smith. Her first recording, in 1923, established her as a unique singer, with enormous sound and haunting presence. She maintained her eminence throughout the 1920s, her repertoire encompassing pop songs and novelties as well as her basic blues.

His genius for expression was forged over a lifetime of stage performances. A Smith show could seem almost religious, with the crowd moaning and shouting “Amen.” But his appeal was also sexual: a favorite trick was to “walk one”, singing directly to a male member of the audience until he stumbled like a trance towards the stage.

Sarah vaughan

Sarah Vaughan

Photo by Bob Parent / Getty Images

A true jazz diva, Sarah vaughan captivated listeners by its pure sonic beauty and its inventive flexibility. His blend of sensual tone and technical mastery has earned him the public nickname “The Divine One”; her fellow musicians, impressed by her confidence, nicknamed her “Sassy”.

A talented pianist and singer, she grew up with the bebop pioneers, recording with Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker, who admired her deeply. But from the 1950s on, his sumptuous voice, with its four-octave range and opera agility, caught the attention of the pop industry. For much of her career, she veered between the two worlds, earning an intermediate suite for albums of dreamy ballads with strings, while charming jazz fans with her swing and artful phrasing.


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10 of the best jazz singers of all time https://jazzfin.com/10-of-the-best-jazz-singers-of-all-time/ https://jazzfin.com/10-of-the-best-jazz-singers-of-all-time/#respond Sun, 14 Jun 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/10-of-the-best-jazz-singers-of-all-time/ There has always been a cool, sweet swagger around jazz music. Originally designed for dancing, this musical genre has developed its truly indefinable identity through the evolution of talented musical improvisations. Following the beat of the beat, jazz music stems from a blend of African-American musical traditions in the blues, folk and swing genres. Originally […]]]>

There has always been a cool, sweet swagger around jazz music. Originally designed for dancing, this musical genre has developed its truly indefinable identity through the evolution of talented musical improvisations. Following the beat of the beat, jazz music stems from a blend of African-American musical traditions in the blues, folk and swing genres.

Originally from New Orleans, Louisiana, the sounds of jazz almost represent history and the importance of its diversity in all its aspects. From the late 19th century, New Orleans played a key role in its development as the city’s population was the most diverse in the South. People of African, French, Caribbean, Italian, German, Mexican, Native American and English descent contributed to what defined the urban culture of New Orleans, which in a way, can also symbolically represent the diversity of all parts and instruments of jazz. music.

Jazz musicians include saxophonists, trumpeters, pianists, guitarists, bassists and drummers; all experts with instruments capable of emphasizing and following rhythmic improvisations. However, we must not forget that if jazz could be defined by one aspect of itself, it would be jazz singers. So, out of all the talent in jazz music, here is a list of 10 of the best jazz singers of all time.

10. Mose Allison (1927-2016)

The way this Mississippi singer-songwriter played jazz music was unique. Her voice went against the grain by delivering her lighter, simpler voice through more elegantly lively tunes. The combination of his slight southern, conversational inflection with a hint of blues is what defined him as a great jazz artist.

9. Helen Merrill (1930-)

This New York native’s real name is Jelena Milcetic, and she is of Croatian ancestry. His rise to fame began in the early 1950s singing with famous jazz pianist Earl Hines. Her voice is described “like the sonorous equivalent of golden and drizzled honey” with its more acute, soft and soft tones.

8. Kurt Elling (1967-)

Born in Chicago, Elling was considered one of the best jazz singers in contemporary jazz. Not only was he a scat singer and able to improvise with his voice as jazz musicians normally do, but he was also known to have written his own original material with moving force.

7. Julie London (1926-2000)

Showcasing a smokier and more sultry tone, this Californian actress became known for her iconic 1956 recording of Arthur Hamilton’s “Cry Me a River”. Her voice painting romance and intimacy in this cover art has sold 3 million copies, making her highly respected in the jazz community.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bOLGv3WPnVQ

6. Ray Charles (1930-2004)

Although one of the founding fathers of what is now soul music, the talented blind artist was also an incredible jazz musician. He was a saxophonist and pianist, with R&B inspired vocals originally taking after Nat? King? Cole. Nicknamed “The Genius”, Charles found his own vocal sounds in the 1950s.

5. Louis Armstrong (1901-1971)

Hailing from New Orleans, this expert trumpeter introduced his expert in improvisation in the 1920s. However, his voice separated him from normal jazz singers, making him increasingly incredibly popular. Nicknamed “Satchmo”, he is also known for his biggest worldwide hit in the 1960s, “What a Wonderful World”.

4. Billie Holiday (1915-1959)

The poignant hint of calm that contributes to what defines jazz music comes from this incredibly influential jazz singer from Philly. She started singing in the big band era, but forged her own path with her characteristic melancholy voice. Her unique tone was defined by a sense of pain and sadness attributed to her difficult life as a child prostitute and later to drug addiction. She had a major influence on female jazz artists.

3. Nat? Roi? Cole (1919-1965)

This incredible pianist has become famous for his iconically soft and velvety voice. Also known for forming the “Route 66” jazz trio, the Alabama native originally had a few R&B hits. In 1956, he became the first African-American artist to host a variety television show. But he will always be known for his passion for jazz.

2. Frank Sinatra (1916-1998)

Considered one of the most popular and influential musical artists of the 20th century, the “Chairman of the Board” received this nickname when he started Reprise Records in an attempt to keep artists in control. creative and property / publication rights to their music. He was known to have defined his fame as a musical artist by drawing inspiration from “The Great American Songbook”, which in turn iconically made him known as a jazz artist for his sophisticated voice.

1. Ella Fitzgerald (1917-1996)

The “first lady of the song” from Virginia was known for her flawless performance of clear and pure eloquence, painted in silky and refined tones. A skilled scat singer, her ability to improvise with her voice matched that of a professional jazz instrumentalist, setting a standard rooted in the art of jazz.

And these are just some of the best jazz singers of all time. Many influential musicians deserve to be on this list as well, including the following: Sarah Vaughan, Nina Simone, Duke Ellington, Betty Carter, Johnny Hartman, Dinah Washington, Carmen Mcrae, Peggy Lee, Billy Eckstine, Jon Hendricks, Dizzy Gillespie, Etta James, and more.

And the best thing about this exhaustive list of names that to represent the face of jazz? The celebration of diversity to which each of these artists contributed, defining the meaning of this historically full musical genre.


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UNL Jazz Singers ‘take off’ with DownBeat Award | Extra Quarter https://jazzfin.com/unl-jazz-singers-take-off-with-downbeat-award-extra-quarter/ https://jazzfin.com/unl-jazz-singers-take-off-with-downbeat-award-extra-quarter/#respond Fri, 08 May 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/unl-jazz-singers-take-off-with-downbeat-award-extra-quarter/ Stefanie Vanderbeek was individually honored as an Outstanding Debut Soloist in “Fly Away Birdie”. University of Nebraska-Lincoln jazz singers Glenn Korff School of Music were recently named winners of the 43rd Annual DownBeat Student Music Awards. The Jazz Singers are laureates in the “Large Vocal Jazz Ensemble Undergraduate College Outstanding Performances” category. Created in 1976, […]]]>

University of Nebraska-Lincoln jazz singers Glenn Korff School of Music were recently named winners of the 43rd Annual DownBeat Student Music Awards. The Jazz Singers are laureates in the “Large Vocal Jazz Ensemble Undergraduate College Outstanding Performances” category.

Created in 1976, the DownBeat Awards are considered the most prestigious awards in jazz education.

Led by David von Kampen, the Jazz Singers have submitted only live, unedited recordings of the fall semester concerts at Kimball Recital Hall. The recordings included “Groovin ‘Hard”, arranged by Dave Barduhn; arrangements of von Kampen’s “Fly Away Birdie”, with soloist Stefanie Vanderbeek; and “Maria Walks Amid the Thorn”, an unaccompanied Advent song “that blurs the line between jazz and chamber choir style,” according to von Kampen.

“I love that these three selections have a wide stylistic range and that they really show all the different things the band does well,” said von Kampen.

Jazz singers this year included Casey Allen, Halley Benjamin, Matthew Carter, Justin Eisenbeis, Noah Floersch, Michael Golden, Tess Jisa, Matthew Lowe, Elias Lozada, Greyson McCown, Olivia McCown, Madeline Reddel, Erik Skoog, Maddy Stark and Vanderbeek . The rhythm section consisted of Andrew Wray on drums and Christian Chesanek on bass.

Vanderbeek was also individually honored as an Outstanding Beginning Soloist in “Fly Away Birdie”. She graduated as a junior in advertising and public relations at UNL with minors in history, computer science and music technology. The performance “Fly Award Birdie” can be seen at https://youtu.be/UwPye7Z-izM.


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“Famous Female Jazz Singers” scheduled for April 19 https://jazzfin.com/famous-female-jazz-singers-scheduled-for-april-19/ https://jazzfin.com/famous-female-jazz-singers-scheduled-for-april-19/#respond Sat, 13 Apr 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/famous-female-jazz-singers-scheduled-for-april-19/ Jacqueline Beaumont will present her own interpretation of “Famous Female Jazz Singers” on Friday April 19th at Elks Lodge, 132 Abbott Lane. Show time is 6 to 7:30 pm, with seats at 5:30 pm Tickets are $ 10 at the door for members of the Hot Springs Jazz Society; $ 15 for non-members; and $ […]]]>

Jacqueline Beaumont will present her own interpretation of “Famous Female Jazz Singers” on Friday April 19th at Elks Lodge, 132 Abbott Lane.

Show time is 6 to 7:30 pm, with seats at 5:30 pm Tickets are $ 10 at the door for members of the Hot Springs Jazz Society; $ 15 for non-members; and $ 10 for Elks members, with a special discount for students.

A steak dinner will be available for $ 14 at 5 p.m. for concert ticket holders in the Elks Lodge dining room.

“Not just jazz, Jackie mixes it up for a fantastic and memorable audience experience,” a press release said.

Beaumont will be supported by star jazz musicians Les Pack on guitar, CE Askew on drums, Taylor Smith on bass and Matt Schatz on saxophone. The concert will also feature a student violinist, Krystyna Valdivia, from Lakeside High School.

The Hot Springs Jazz Society will host two more live jazz events on May 17 and June 21. said a press release.

The Hot Springs Jazz Society is a nonprofit, voluntary organization dedicated to the perpetuation, promotion and preservation of jazz music, an original American art form. The Jazz Society is funded in part by the Arkansas Arts Council, the Hot Springs Advertising and Promotion Commission, the Morris Foundation, the Hot Springs Community Foundation, and the Elisabeth Wagner Foundation, as well as many other private and private sponsors.

Call 501-627-2425 for more information.

Animation on 04/13/2019


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Griffith’s jazz singers shortlisted for national scholarship – Griffith News https://jazzfin.com/griffiths-jazz-singers-shortlisted-for-national-scholarship-griffith-news/ https://jazzfin.com/griffiths-jazz-singers-shortlisted-for-national-scholarship-griffith-news/#respond Mon, 30 Apr 2018 07:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/griffiths-jazz-singers-shortlisted-for-national-scholarship-griffith-news/ Queensland Conservatory jazz singers Adelina Martinez and Merinda Dias Jayasinha are among six Australian singers shortlisted for the prestigious Generations in Jazz vocal grant. The scholarship is part of the annual program Generations at the Jazz Festival, founded by Australian jazz legend James Morrison in 1982. Previous recipients of the vocal scholarship have included a […]]]>

Queensland Conservatory jazz singers Adelina Martinez and Merinda Dias Jayasinha are among six Australian singers shortlisted for the prestigious Generations in Jazz vocal grant.

The scholarship is part of the annual program Generations at the Jazz Festival, founded by Australian jazz legend James Morrison in 1982.

Previous recipients of the vocal scholarship have included a number of Queensland Conservatorium alumni, including Megan Washington, Elly Hoyt and Kayleigh Pincott.

Adelina said qualifying for the final alongside her friend Merinda was “one of the best days of my life”.

“It’s so exciting, I had to convince myself it wasn’t a dream! she said.

“To qualify for the final is a great personal victory and a validation that I am going in the right direction.”

“Merinda and I started the same year and she is one of my best friends.

“None of us are focused on competing – jazz is so collaborative and it will be a great opportunity to immerse myself in the music and meet other like-minded souls.

“I can’t wait to perform in the huge festival marquee in front of thousands of people – it’s so different from the little jazz clubs I usually perform at!”

Adelina had to struggle to study music – initially facing resistance from her parents.

“When I was 15, I secretly found a part-time job to pay for singing lessons – it lasted almost 18 months before my mom found out!

“My singing teacher encouraged me to apply for Con – I didn’t even know what it was back then!

“I don’t come from a musical background, my parents were immigrants from Uruguay where there are real economic difficulties and people don’t place a high value on the arts.

“My mom is a scientist and she just didn’t get it.

“She’s here now – she realizes now that there are loads of opportunities if you take up the challenge.

“There is such a world of opportunity out there – I am a student, a music teacher, a performer, a conductor.”

Merinda was shortlisted for the vocal scholarship last year and is delighted to return to Mount Gambier for the Generations in Jazz festival, which attracts the world’s best jazz performers and thousands of budding jazz musicians.

“It’s a chance to see a great group of musicians and make great music,” she said.

“It’s an experience like no other.

Both singers are taught by legendary Con vocal coach and keynote speaker Dr Irene Bartlett, who has mentored everyone from Dami Im to Katie Noonan.

“We have had great success at the Generations in Jazz Festival over the years,” she said.

“To have a singer in the final of a national competition like this is amazing, but to have two is a real hit and it is a tribute to the talent that we have here at Con.

“You don’t have to be a part of the Sydney or Melbourne jazz scene to be successful in the industry – our accomplishments speak for themselves.

Queensland Conservatorium Director Professor Scott Harrison said the Queensland Conservatorium’s jazz program was recognized as one of Australia’s best, with graduates finding success nationally and internationally.

“We have produced many remarkable singers who have transformed the Australian music scene – from Dami Im to Katie Noonan and Megan Washington,” he said.

“Adelina and Merinda are among the next generation of talented students who are making their mark in the industry.

“We remain the dream destination for budding young musicians around the world – this has been confirmed by our position among the top 50 performing arts programs in the world and our recent ranking as the # 1 creative arts school. from the country. “

the Generations at the Jazz Festival will take place May 4-6 in Mt Gambier, South Australia.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ny89DAWGVFo


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Bowhead whales are the “jazz singers of the Arctic” https://jazzfin.com/bowhead-whales-are-the-jazz-singers-of-the-arctic/ https://jazzfin.com/bowhead-whales-are-the-jazz-singers-of-the-arctic/#respond Thu, 05 Apr 2018 07:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/bowhead-whales-are-the-jazz-singers-of-the-arctic/ Bowhead whales have many unusual qualities. They can live 200 years. They have the largest mouths of all living animals, but only eat very small ocean creatures through a filtered-power process. They have the thickest fat, or greasy covering, of all whales. Another interesting quality? Their underwater style of communication makes scientists compare them to […]]]>

Bowhead whales have many unusual qualities. They can live 200 years. They have the largest mouths of all living animals, but only eat very small ocean creatures through a filtered-power process. They have the thickest fat, or greasy covering, of all whales.

Another interesting quality? Their underwater style of communication makes scientists compare them to “Jazz“artists.

Researchers this week published the results of an intensive study of the vocalizations, or whale song, of about 300 bowhead whales. The population they studied lived in the waters east of Greenland.

The researchers made the recordings from 2010 to 2014. They used a submarine microphone to bring together the largest collection of bowhead whale sounds ever.

The recordings show many types of vocal sounds which change often. The researchers identified 184 different songs among the population.

Whales use sound to move, communicate, hunt for food and find mates. Sound travels easily underwater.

Of the world’s whales, only bowhead and humpback whales produce a large variety of songs. Other filter feed baleen whales, such as blue whales, fin whales, and minke whales, produce much simpler songs. And their songs stay almost the same every year.

Kate Stafford is an oceanographer at the University of Washington. She described the humpback songs as very orderly, like classical music. But bowhead whale songs are freer, she says. They don’t seem to follow a clear set of rules. Stafford and other scientists have compared the songs of bowhead whales to jazz music.

“Bowhead whales are the jazz singers of the Arctic. You don’t know what they’re going to do, ”she told The Associated Press.

Scientists believe that only male bowhead whales sing, and they sing to find a mate. And the males “improvise” their songs for to attract females. Improvisation in jazz means performing part of a song without preparation.

Kit Kovacs is a scientist at the Norwegian Polar Institute and the Norwegian University Center in Svalbard. She said the whales sing to show “they’re ready to mate.”

“The song is usually only performed by men to communicate both with other men -” I am taller, stronger, and so on … – and with women – “I am tall, strong and highly motivatedKovacs told Reuters news agency.

Kovacs described the sounds of bowhead whales as “very varied”. A bit of sound “haunted, “she said. Others sound” wild. “

The research was published Wednesday in Biology letters. This confirmed that the songs of the bowhead whales had changed completely over the years and between them, Stafford said.

Stafford admits that the jazzy sounds of whales aren’t for everyone.

“I find the songs quite beautiful, but some people compare them to nails on a chalkboard“Stafford told the AP.

One of Stafford’s favorite Bowhead songs has repeated “woo-woo-woo” sounds. Sometimes, says the scientist, she listens to the songs on her cell phone just to enjoy them.

“They’re pretty funny,” Stafford said.

I am Phil Dierking.

Phil Dierking adapted this story for VOA Learning English based on reports from Reuters and The Associated Press. Ashley Thompson was the editor.

Do you have whales in your country? We want to hear from you. Write to us in the comments section or on our Facebook page.

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Words in this story

filtered – v. pass (something, like a gas or liquid) through a filter to remove something unwanted

vocalizations – nm to express (something) by saying words

baleen – nm whalebone.

Jazz – nm a type of American music with catchy rhythms and melodies that are often composed by musicians as they play

microphone – nm a device in which people speak or sing in order to record their voices or make them sound louder

motivated – adj. have a lot of reasons to do something

nails on a chalkboard – idiom. referring to an extremely annoying, unpleasant and uncomfortable sound or noise.

variety – nm a number or collection of different things or people


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Jazz singers Ali Bodycoat and Libby Hammer ready for Bunbury Fringe | Bunbury Courier https://jazzfin.com/jazz-singers-ali-bodycoat-and-libby-hammer-ready-for-bunbury-fringe-bunbury-courier/ https://jazzfin.com/jazz-singers-ali-bodycoat-and-libby-hammer-ready-for-bunbury-fringe-bunbury-courier/#respond Tue, 13 Feb 2018 08:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/jazz-singers-ali-bodycoat-and-libby-hammer-ready-for-bunbury-fringe-bunbury-courier/ news, local news, Libby Hammer, Ali Bodycoat, Repartee for Two, Theater, Music, Bunbury Fringe Two of Perth’s most beloved jazz singers are ready for the atmosphere and attendees of one of Bunbury’s biggest art festivals. Ali Bodycoat and Libby Hammer will be showcasing their unique musical styles at Bunbury Fringe’s Fringe Hub starting at 8 […]]]>

news, local news, Libby Hammer, Ali Bodycoat, Repartee for Two, Theater, Music, Bunbury Fringe

Two of Perth’s most beloved jazz singers are ready for the atmosphere and attendees of one of Bunbury’s biggest art festivals. Ali Bodycoat and Libby Hammer will be showcasing their unique musical styles at Bunbury Fringe’s Fringe Hub starting at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, February 21. Described as “glorious, superbly polished local hummingbirds,” the duo regularly deliver lively and ironic compositions. Hammer said they were excited to perform at Bunbury Fringe again. “The idea behind Repartee for Two is that we picked our favorites and wanted to play them, it’s a bit of an assortment,” she said. The duo paid tribute to singers in modern music history, including Cole Porter and Burt Bacharach. For more information on this year’s lineup, visit www.bunburyfringe.com. Find out more:

/images/transform/v1/crop/frm/JFPUUEGFiYPyEmH4vMPP9u/812a049e-be31-4587-8794-8fc79e5df034.jpg/r0_32_1500_880_w1200_h678_fmax.jpg

Two of Perth’s most beloved jazz singers are ready for the atmosphere and attendees of one of Bunbury’s biggest art festivals.

Ali Bodycoat and Libby Hammer will deliver their unique musical styles to Bunbury Fringe’s Fringe Hub starting at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, February 21.

Described as “glorious, superbly polished local hummingbirds,” the duo regularly deliver lively and ironic compositions.

Hammer said they were excited to perform at Bunbury Fringe again.

“The idea behind Repartee for Two is that we picked our favorites and wanted to interpret them, it’s a bit of an assortment,” she said.

The duo have paid homage to singers throughout modern music history, including Cole Porter and Burt Bacharach.


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Revealing Musical Riches: Bay Area Jazz Singers Kat Parra and Melissa Morgan https://jazzfin.com/revealing-musical-riches-bay-area-jazz-singers-kat-parra-and-melissa-morgan/ https://jazzfin.com/revealing-musical-riches-bay-area-jazz-singers-kat-parra-and-melissa-morgan/#respond Sun, 17 Jul 2016 07:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/revealing-musical-riches-bay-area-jazz-singers-kat-parra-and-melissa-morgan/ Melissa MorganThe new “Days Like This” album is more of a reintroduction than a daring new step. She made a strong impression in 2009 with her debut album “Until I Met You” (Telarc), a critically acclaimed session featuring a stellar cast of young musicians led by pianist Gerald Clayton. Based in Los Angeles then, she […]]]>

Melissa MorganThe new “Days Like This” album is more of a reintroduction than a daring new step. She made a strong impression in 2009 with her debut album “Until I Met You” (Telarc), a critically acclaimed session featuring a stellar cast of young musicians led by pianist Gerald Clayton. Based in Los Angeles then, she moved to the Bay Area a few years ago and made connections with some of the area’s top musicians, such as pianist Larry Vuckovich and saxophonist Noel Jewkes.

For her second album, she was inspired by her old LA, comrades, players like guitarist Graham Dechter, drummer Kevin Kanner and Clayton, now one of New York’s most esteemed pianists. Released digitally only, Morgan plans to release the project on CD in the coming months.

It’s a blues-focused session, which means Morgan is in his element. She delivers the title song, a Mose Allison classic, with a world weariness so tangy that she looks like her long-lost daughter. She looks crisp and bossy while tearing up Wes Montgomery’s “West Coast Blues” standard, but her painful version of “You Don’t Know Me” and her sultry, captivating take on “Wild Is the Wind” makes me dream of a full program of Morgan songs. ballads and songs with torches.

While “Days Like This” only offers a glimpse of what Morgan can do, it doesn’t take much to recognize an extremely gifted singer with a very bright future.

Kat Parra performs at San Jose’s Hedley Club August 12, Saratoga Maison Rose Coffee August 20, and North Hollywood’s E Spot Lounge September 4.

Melissa Morgan performs at Brisbane’s 7 Thousand House July 26 and Oakland Sound Room August 13.


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