high school – Jazz Fin http://jazzfin.com/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 14:16:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jazzfin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-14-150x150.png high school – Jazz Fin http://jazzfin.com/ 32 32 Braxton Cook wants to keep modernizing jazz music https://jazzfin.com/braxton-cook-wants-to-keep-modernizing-jazz-music/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 19:21:29 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/braxton-cook-wants-to-keep-modernizing-jazz-music/ Music – 3 hours ago Robyn Mowatt Robyn Mowatt is an editor at Okayplayer where she… Photo credit: Lauren Desberg Braxton Cook shares details about his upcoming album and tells us how he felt returning to New York’s Blue Note Jazz Club. Cook Braxtonthe world-renowned saxophonist, composer and singer has been releasing his take […]]]>

Music – 3 hours ago

Robyn Mowatt

Robyn Mowatt is an editor at Okayplayer where she…

Cook Braxton

Photo credit: Lauren Desberg

Braxton Cook shares details about his upcoming album and tells us how he felt returning to New York’s Blue Note Jazz Club.

Cook Braxtonthe world-renowned saxophonist, composer and singer has been releasing his take on jazz music since sharing his debut EP Sketch in 2014. Nearly a week ago, he headlined two shows alongside his band at the New York historic Blue Note Jazz Club, with both sets sold out.

“I’ll be honest, I definitely felt some pressure to come back and play in New York,” Cook said on a Zoom call from his California home.

It was Cook’s first New York show since 2021 at Brooklyn’s Elsewhere Rooftop. Amid the pressure he felt when he took the stage, he also felt the night felt like a reunion since a few of his band members live on the East Coast. The Emmy-winning musician also shared that the crowd got a taste of a new album he’s been working on (but didn’t reveal when the project will arrive).

Born in Boston, Massachusetts, and raised in Greenbelt in Prince George’s County, Maryland, Cook has loved music for as long as he can remember. His parents (father, a pastor; mother, a classically trained pianist) took him and his three brothers (Cook is the second oldest) into various pursuits like basketball and theater in hopes to help them “find our passions”. Taking piano lessons as a child played a role in Cook’s growing love for music, but it was when he started playing the saxophone aged 13 that he found his instrument. predilection. His father is the reason Braxton became obsessed with this instrument from the age of five.

The family moved around a lot but eventually they put down roots in Silver Spring, Maryland. While in Montgomery County — which Braxton called “sidity” — he attended Springbrook High School. His stay there was decisive; he studied the saxophone and took advanced lessons. After graduating in 2009, Cook attended Georgetown University to study English. While there, he worked and gigged on U Street, gradually becoming a fixture in the DC jazz community.

Two years later, he transferred to the Juilliard School where he continued his studies and decided to pursue a full-time musical career. This chance he took on himself proved to be worth it, as New York gave him new space to cut his teeth as a musician and artist, leading to a long-standing collaborative relationship. with Grammy-nominated trumpeter Christian Scott, as well as tours and performances. with the Christian McBride Big Band and Jon Batiste. He finally launched his solo career in 2014, with a burgeoning fan base and critically acclaimed tours and performances.

Cook’s soulful sound seamlessly blends jazz with funk, soul and gospel, a testament to the passionate and thoughtful work he does as an independent artist. Each of his albums is the product of the years he spent honing his craft and reinventing himself, as he did with the 2020s. fire sign, an album that saw him delve further into an R&B lane. With his next album, he will mix elements he has already explored in the past, while pushing jazz towards modern sounds.

Okayplayer recently caught up with Braxton Cook and talked to him about his life in California as a husband and father, his upcoming album and more.

How does it feel to start the year with a show at the Blue Note?

It feels like a restart button I felt like I wanted – and all of us, including my band members, everyone, we deserve it. This senseless act of God came through like a storm and ravaged our community. And not only the livelihood of artists, but also that of club owners. It’s an ecosystem.

We lost a lot of music clubs. So it’s a blessing that Blue Note was able to weather this storm. On top of that, it was a blessing that the five of us, my party members and myself, and really a lot of the cats I know, were able to weather this storm. But not everyone. So I don’t take that for granted. It’s just an absolute blessing.

How do you think being a husband and father interferes with your work?

Practically, it will definitely affect your time. You have to learn to – or rather – I have to learn to manage my time better. It’s one thing here because now we’re up at 5:00 in the morning, 5:30, 5:45. Trying to work around nap times, feeding times, all those sorts of things. Me and my wife, we have flexible hours. She is a teacher, works two days a week. I create my own schedule and have shows from time to time. It’s very fortunate, but it sets a precedent for filling our time with specific things that really cater to its development. And we’re adamant about that stuff. It definitely helped me manage my time better.

Braxton Cook's Blue Note Jazz Club

Braxton Cook performing at a sold out show at the Blue Note Jazz Club alongside his band Michael King, Andrew Renfroe, Papa Henry and Curtis Nowosad. Photo credit: Jamel Love

Can you share a bit about your upcoming album?

The plan is, tentatively, that I’d like to scrap probably by the end of the year. Like the last trimester, at the beginning of the last trimester. So probably a fall record, I think, with the fall tour. If not, I will definitely at least release some music this summer. I’m excited about this one. For the first time, I put people on this record. I am thrilled to open the record, the music and the sound to others in my community and around me.

What can we expect the sound to sound like?

Basically similar to my folder somewhere in between. I kind of want to stick to my core, in the sense that I’m really from both worlds, both languages. I want to merge the two. This has been the mission from the start. I think [with] fire sign, I went further down that R&B path. It was cool. I mean, it was only eight songs. This one, I want it to be like a 12, 13 song project. And I want to have both fully instrumental tracks and just full R&B for people who love both sides of my art. That’s really it. I’m not going to try to create a whole new name for the sound. But it’s literally like modern jazz, where the sound I feel is enhanced with the 808s, and cool sounds to blend in with the R&B stuff.

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“Music of Black Americans”: honoring black history through jazz music https://jazzfin.com/music-of-black-americans-honoring-black-history-through-jazz-music/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 23:41:53 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/music-of-black-americans-honoring-black-history-through-jazz-music/ SIOUX FALLS, SD (KELO) — Shortly after black Americans found themselves freed from the shackles of slavery in the late 19th century, the labor songs that echoed among the estates worked by slaves turned into what we now call jazz and blues. The history of jazz is long and complex but its impact on modern […]]]>

SIOUX FALLS, SD (KELO) — Shortly after black Americans found themselves freed from the shackles of slavery in the late 19th century, the labor songs that echoed among the estates worked by slaves turned into what we now call jazz and blues.

The history of jazz is long and complex but its impact on modern music and culture is still felt today according to jazz historians. A new three-part series from Augustana University and the Sioux Falls Jazz & Blues Society hopes to educate people about the history of jazz music and shine a light on the African-American musicians who were instrumental in shaping the genre.

Dr. Peter Folliard, dean of the Augustana School of Music, said the opportunity for the series arose after Alex Gilbert-Schrag, executive director of Sioux Falls Jazz & Blues (SFJB), advanced the idea of ​​creating a project in partnership with the university’s multimedia entrepreneurship program. Folliard said it made sense to partner because the university and SFJB both share a passion for jazz education and performance.

“Augustana is very committed to teaching jazz both in the classroom and in the rehearsal room,” Dr. Folliard said.

Jazz and the African-American experience

While it can be difficult to attribute the creation of jazz to a specific time and place, Augustana Assistant Professor of Music Dr. Brian Hanegan says it’s clear that jazz dates back to the region. of the Mississippi Delta between 1895 and 1915. Dr. Hanegan says that being a port city, New Orleans, Louisiana attracted people from all over the world and that, combined with the surplus brass and percussion instruments left behind by the Civil War, they made the perfect ingredients to create jazz.

The first part of the “Origins of Jazz” series focuses on the idea that jazz music is uniquely American. This is because the music itself originated from the work songs and field cries that slaves used to sing while working in the plantations and fields. The call-and-response nature and use of the pentatonic scale that was present in pitch songs became the basis of jazz music as a whole.

These songs morphed into blues and eventually jazz, Hanegan explained.

“The music was expressive and told the stories of the problems, the pain and the daily life that these African Americans lived. Music provided a platform and a voice for African Americans in mainstream society.

Dr. Brian Hanegan, Associate Professor of Music

While jazz originated in the Mississippi Delta, the great migration of the mid-20th century saw millions of black Americans leave the South and settle in northern cities, bringing jazz and blues with them. With migration, jazz music evolved in style and form while reaching out to black audiences.

As big bands become more popular, jazz music has reached white audiences, Hanegan said. While segregation was still prevalent at this time, dance halls allowed black musicians to gain prominence and upward mobility in the industry.

“There were also white bandleaders at the time, like Benny Goodman, who employed black musicians, because they were the best talent, and spoke out to promote the end of color barriers and divisions. racial lines in the United States,” Hanegan said.

The video series focuses heavily on the impact black artists such as Louis Armstrong have had on the genre. It even includes a story of Duke Ellington performing in Dell Rapids, South Dakota, and a local jazz musician’s unique connection to this historic visit.

While musicians of all races have contributed to jazz music, the genre is uniquely African American according to Dr. Folliard.

“Jazz music is black American music,” Folliard said.

At a time when black Americans faced lynching, segregation, and the disenfranchisement of other Americans, jazz music provided a venue for artists to express themselves. Both Folliard and Hanegan talked about jazz being an individualistic expression within a composition and for black Americans they were able to connect with other people through this art form.

For non-black artists, it extends the invitation to express themselves through jazz music.

“There’s an opportunity there to take historical context and play it with that awareness, but also, damn it, I can’t help but, as a creator, have my own influence and voice in this. “, said Folliard.

As a collaborative art form, Folliard said you can see black and white artists working together and learning from each other as they push the genre forward and even into new areas of music like rock and roll. roll, soul and pop.

“That’s also when you start to see integration instead of segregation, it’s first on stage. Oh if it can exist with music, maybe it can exist in dance halls…. This is where the beautiful mix of culture starts to happen.

Dr. Peter Folliard, Dean of the Augustana School of Music

While jazz music remains its own genre of music that is still evolving today, the fundamentals of jazz music have shaped the music we listen to today, according to Folliard. From electric instruments to harmony, Folliard says, it influenced music as early as the 1920s.

“Jazz broadened our harmonic palette. It influenced rock and pop music, it influenced classical music,” Folliard said.

When Dr. Folliard moved to Sioux Falls in 2017, he said there wasn’t much of a live jazz music scene beyond college and high school performances. But in the 5 years since he arrived, he’s seen this scene grow tremendously.

From live jazz performances at the Levitt in the summer to weekly jazz nights at the R Wine Bar & Kitchen, Folliard and Hanegan are pleased to see local businesses offering jazz musicians the opportunity to perform and the public the chance to experience this live music.

“There’s clearly a support and love for jazz here and I think it will continue to grow as long as we have people to run it and people to come and listen,” Folliard said. “Without jazz music, I don’t want to be here.”

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A local chef turns a jazz club into a dining haven https://jazzfin.com/a-local-chef-turns-a-jazz-club-into-a-dining-haven/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 16:55:34 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/a-local-chef-turns-a-jazz-club-into-a-dining-haven/ John Chambal prepares all that jazz – and excellent Bolognese. Photo: Thomas Stauder. The old adage that you don’t eat in a jazz club is regularly denied by Jean Chambal to a lair in Tarryville devoted to the great American musical idiom. Here, the recipe for success includes a chef with a local clientele and […]]]>
John Chambal prepares all that jazz – and excellent Bolognese. Photo: Thomas Stauder.

The old adage that you don’t eat in a jazz club is regularly denied by Jean Chambal to a lair in Tarryville devoted to the great American musical idiom. Here, the recipe for success includes a chef with a local clientele and fond memories of growing up in Rivertown.

Chambal, a seasoned caterer who ran the restaurant and ready meals emporium Good food in Briarcliff Manor for nearly a decade, was in charge of the food operation at Jazz Forum since 2020, and judging by the steady stream of dinners, salads and desserts leaving the small kitchen on a recent visit, music fans have been on to great food at the club.

Essentially, Chambal’s job as chef at the Jazz Forum encompasses the three days the club is open, Friday through Sunday, as well as preparations for Thursday, when he simmers bolognese sauce for fusilli or rolls all-beef. small plates of meatballs, two of the club’s signature dishes. Also, on Sunday nights when the club presents Brazilian jazz, Chambal is ahead to make feijoada (pronounced fay-jwah-dah), a stew of smoked sausage, pork, and beans that is Brazil’s national dish and served as a one-night special.

The rest of the limited menu of Jazz Forum focuses on the best of classic Italian favorite cuisine of the club’s owners, trumpet / flugelhorn Marc Morganelli and his wife and business partner, Ellen Prior—antipasti, burrata on salad, seasonal soups and charcuterie and cheese platters, as well as portions of vegetable farro, free-range chicken and roast salmon. Complementing the flavors for the sweet tooth are, of course, cannoli and ice cream, and Chambal’s unique versions on apple crisps and fudge brownies.

Asked what customers of the Jazz Forum seemed to like most about his cuisine, Chambal quickly exclaims: “They love everything! »

John Chambal in the kitchen (Doug Schneider Photography)

The real trick, notes Chambal, is getting all the orders in on a tight deadline. The club features music in two sets, at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., and because each set typically lasts 75 to 90 minutes, drink and food service can’t drag on. On evenings when the house is full, nearly 100 people can be served at each set.

“Mark and Ellen have a real passion for food, so we bring in great produce, prepare it well, and deliver it as quickly as possible,” Chambal says. “It’s a challenge every weekend, but also very satisfying for me professionally. We know people don’t go to jazz clubs for the food. OK, but why not? The idea was to create a situation where people know they’ll have a great meal when they come here and judging by the reviews, that’s what we’ve achieved.

Chambal grew up in Elmsford, attended schools in Tarrytown and was friends with Charlie Breitenbachwhose family owned a bakery Dixon Street which is now the Jazz Forum site. After school, he visited Charlie at the bakery – “the smell of cakes and breads was amazing,” he said. At the age of 11, Chambal earned two dollars an hour washing dishes at the Washington Irving Boat Club. He graduated from Sleepy Hollow High School and moved to Austin, Texas, where he worked in different restaurants for 10 years, and followed the cooking management program Hyatt before returning to Tarrytown and work as a baker for a caterer. Abigail Kirsch for two years before opening a catering business, Custom Cuisine. Beginning in the early 1990s, Morganelli was a regular client of Chambal’s restaurant business for backstage broadcasts of the Music Hall concerts he presented through his non-profit organization Jazz Forum Arts.

Now 58, Chambal lives in Elmsford and spends hours running an organic farm in Congregation Sons of Israel at Briarcliff Manor, the seasonal source of much of the produce used at the Jazz Forum. He also runs an award-winning winery there. In his spare time, he races sailboats and also kayaks on the Hudson. Any evening at the Jazz Forum, Chambal can poke his head out of the kitchen and see former Good Food customers still hungry for his meals and familiar faces from Tarrytowns.

The Jazz Forum opened its doors in June 2017 and three former chefs had bitten the biscotti before Chambal signed on.

“John is so easy going and he cooks really well,” Prior said. “At first we weren’t there to be a restaurant, but now we want to celebrate what he does. The food he prepares is delicious. Prior added that it was Chambal’s idea to prepare dinners with the club’s unused inventory and donating them to the local food pantry during the Covid-19 pandemic lockdown.”We are so proud of John, we never want to lose him! And did you know he like to sing when he cooks?

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Just in Time: Congress Hotel to Open “The Century Room” Jazz Club | Music function https://jazzfin.com/just-in-time-congress-hotel-to-open-the-century-room-jazz-club-music-function/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 08:02:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/just-in-time-congress-hotel-to-open-the-century-room-jazz-club-music-function/ Click to enlarge Over the past 100 years or so, The Congress Hotel has survived structural fires, seen Prohibition come and go, and hosted everyone from U.S. Senators to John Dillinger and his criminal gang. Today, a new addition to the historic landmark merges a New York nightclub with a borderline mezcal […]]]>

Over the past 100 years or so, The Congress Hotel has survived structural fires, seen Prohibition come and go, and hosted everyone from U.S. Senators to John Dillinger and his criminal gang. Today, a new addition to the historic landmark merges a New York nightclub with a borderline mezcal bar.

Shana Oseran, owner of the Congress Hotel with her husband, Richard Oseran, and music programmer Arthur Vint are teaming up to open a jazz club in the hotel’s former Copper Hall space. The Century Room, with a grand opening scheduled for March, will host weekly jazz shows, serve local mezcals, beers and wines, and offer a step back in time.

“We have the plaza and the Club Congress, which is where it all started, and now moving into that third genre, it’s really exciting,” Oseran said. “Where in town, or anywhere, can you find a place that has three different concert halls?”

The Copper Hall was a banquet hall along the southwest side of the building with windows looking out over the hubbub of Congress Street. With a reduction in banquets and similar events due to the pandemic, Oseran was looking for a new concept to fill the vacant room when she started talking with Vint.

“While there are many great jazz musicians and great jazz shows in Tucson, there hasn’t been a single house to host concerts or tours,” Vint said. “There are a lot of musicians touring across the country, and these bands usually stop touring in Phoenix and go home. By building a world-class club and stage, we hope to bring people to come to Tucson on their West Coast tours.

Vint grew up in Tucson and graduated from Rincon High School.

He also worked at the Congress Hotel as a night shift receptionist before earning a bachelor’s degree in jazz performance from William Paterson University in New Jersey and a master’s degree from the Manhattan School of Music. From there, Vint established a career as a freelance drummer, composer, and bandleader throughout New York City beginning in 2007.

Vint says he plays everything from jazz and salsa to pop and rock, and has performed at some of the world’s most renowned venues and appeared on numerous albums. He has also starred on screen in Boardwalk Empire, The Knick and John Wick.

After performing at the plaza in April 2021, Vint floated the idea of ​​turning The Copper Hall into a space inspired by the Village Vanguard jazz club in New York, where Vint worked as a head bartender.

Now, after 15 years in New York and the last year and a half bouncing between New York and Tucson, Vint is returning to his desert home full-time to teach jazz at the University of Arizona and work with Oseran as a as music programmer for La salle du siècle.

“The Vanguard is sort of the mecca of jazz clubs, and all the other jazz clubs point to The Vanguard,” Vint said. “It was a point of reference in the design stages, but we did a lot of detail work to make the space feel like it had been there for 100 years. he Congress hotel has just celebrated its 100th anniversary, it also refers to the factory of the century – we are an agave bar with over 40 agave spirits – and we also hope it will be there for 100 years. you walk in, it feels like it’s always been there.”

The former Copper Hall foyer is now a soundproof stage. The new entrance is through 100-year-old vestibule doors at the corner of Congress St. and Fifth Ave. Doors open to the bar on the left and wooden shutters along the south windows facing Congress St. There are booths, bar stools and 75 table seats with a clear line of sight to the stage which surrounds the far right corner of the room.

“You feel like you’ve arrived at this beautiful and important space,” Vint said. “I always like bars and places where you walk in and feel like you have to lower your voice a bit out of respect, and I think it can have that effect on people.”

Although the space as a whole is new, elements of the past are interwoven inside.

“All those brown, chocolate, delicious curtains that used to surround the whole banquet hall are now reconfigured as the backdrop of the stage on all three sides,” Oseran said.

“We’re going to be open this Friday and Saturday to start, but we plan to expand our days and hours as we get an idea of ​​how it will fit.”

The inauguration is scheduled for the first weekend of March. Until then, they have started holding preview concerts every week on Friday, February 4. The first show sold out, so they added a second seat, a common practice in New York nightclubs. The first service is at 7:30 p.m. and the second at 9 p.m.

The first to perform in this new space was the Homero Cerón Latin Jazz Quartet on Friday, February 4. Cerón has spent over 40 years as principal percussionist of the Tucson Symphony Orchestra and plans to perform a mix of originals and Latin classics. It turns out that Cerón was also Vint’s first drum teacher.

On Friday, February 11, Susan Artemis and her quartet perform “Love Songs from the Dark Side of the Lounge” for a special Valentine’s Day weekend concert.

The Howard Alden Trio will take the stage on Friday, February 18 to perform Alden’s favorite compositions throughout his career. Alden is a world famous guitarist from New York who recently moved to Phoenix.

“I look forward to having a dedicated venue that elevates jazz in Tucson,” Vint said. “Local and world-class jazz musicians now have a space where they can perform original music and special projects…drinks will be great too.”

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School district consolidation plan worries some Albion residents https://jazzfin.com/school-district-consolidation-plan-worries-some-albion-residents/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 12:39:34 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/school-district-consolidation-plan-worries-some-albion-residents/ ALBION — Fairfield-based school district administrators are pushing ahead with plans to consolidate students into a new school, but some people in Albion oppose the effort because it would shut down the city’s school. Kara Kugelmeyer, an Albion resident and former board member for Maine School Administrative District 49, said she believes the district hasn’t […]]]>

ALBION — Fairfield-based school district administrators are pushing ahead with plans to consolidate students into a new school, but some people in Albion oppose the effort because it would shut down the city’s school.

Kara Kugelmeyer, an Albion resident and former board member for Maine School Administrative District 49, said she believes the district hasn’t fully considered the impact the closures will have on Albion and Clinton, towns that would each lose their only school. In order to spread the information to the people of Albion, she created a website and sent letters to everyone in town.

“I feel like getting state money to build a new building for a neighborhood is a big win – I’m not denying that,” Kugelmeyer said. “But that can be true at the same time that closing a school in a city is a terrible loss, both of those things can be true.”

The process for the new building began several years ago when school districts across the state sent requests to the Maine Department of Education for money to pay for the construction of the school. In 2018, the state released a priority list of 74 schools, ranking Fairfield Primary School No. 1, Clinton Elementary School No. 39 and Albion Elementary School No. 58.

MSAD 49 hired CHA Architecture, a Portland-based company, to work on the neighborhood project. After surveying elementary schools, the company recommended a plan that would move all kindergarten through second grade classes to Benton Elementary School, and third through sixth grades to a new building — a recommendation that been accepted by the district building committee and the school board.

Consolidation is not required by the state to receive funding, the district Superintendent Roberta Hersom said, but it is encouraged for the sake of efficiency and cost-effectiveness. The district continued with site selection for the new building and identified a property next to Benton Elementary School as the ideal location.

The school board will hold a meeting on Wednesday at Lawrence High School to discuss the site selection process. It will include a presentation of the architects on the site of the new building and allow time for questions.

“We very much want the community to understand the selection process and rationale and hopefully build excitement for this opportunity for a publicly funded construction project that will not only mitigate the financial impact of many aging facilities, but will provide our students and our community with a state-of-the-art building designed to meet the needs of the neighborhood for many years to come,” Hersom said in an email.

Kugelmeyer argues that the loss of Albion’s elementary school would impose a financial burden on the town. Staying in the neighborhood means the city would continue to be responsible for a portion of the costs, including expenses that the new building creates that are not covered by the state.

She further argues that the lack of a school in town, coupled with longer bus journeys for students, makes the town less attractive to families considering moving to the area.

Kugelmeyer said one of the considerations is for the city to leave the school district and move to a school choice model.

“When you look at what’s going to happen to your community — the community that doesn’t get the new school in their town — that’s just not a win for us,” Kugelmeyer said. “So I’m not in favor of it, because I don’t think it’s a victory for our city. I think we would be much better served with the choice of school.

If the city left the district, it could instead contract with several districts in the area, allowing families to choose which school they wish to attend. Kugelmeyer said this option would be less expensive than staying in the district because Albion would only have to pay the districts per student.

Kugelmeyer pointed out that even if the city leaves the district, families can still choose to attend school in MSAD 49, they would just have more options.

Kugelmeyer said she was working to bring the issue to the Albion town meeting in March. The question for the inhabitants would be to open negotiations with the municipality to leave. The city would begin to negotiate and any final decision would be up to residents for another vote.


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Conversations with the Neighbors: Mitchell Borden, Co-Founder of the Ornithology Jazz Club: Bushwick Daily https://jazzfin.com/conversations-with-the-neighbors-mitchell-borden-co-founder-of-the-ornithology-jazz-club-bushwick-daily/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/conversations-with-the-neighbors-mitchell-borden-co-founder-of-the-ornithology-jazz-club-bushwick-daily/ For a time during his teenage years, Mitchell Borden feared he had begun to acquire the dangerously seductive characteristics of a cult leader. “I wore sandals and robes in high school,” Borden tells me. He’s stuck in a corner Ornithology Jazz Club, which he founded in October alongside his wife, Rie Yamaguchi-Borden. “I was afraid […]]]>


For a time during his teenage years, Mitchell Borden feared he had begun to acquire the dangerously seductive characteristics of a cult leader.

“I wore sandals and robes in high school,” Borden tells me. He’s stuck in a corner Ornithology Jazz Club, which he founded in October alongside his wife, Rie Yamaguchi-Borden. “I was afraid of being a little Charlie Manson, because I had followers. I had my little devotees. And I was afraid that they would blindly follow me.

But the fact is, once you start listening to Borden’s loathings of popular culture and his determined plea for an inward-looking life – for a life free from the violent demands of a society bent on devaluing from a human being to that of a commodity — you might want to tell Borden that if there is indeed a cult, you might like to join.

“I mean, society – media – they tell you that you are short, stupid, fat, ugly, you have yellow teeth, your breath stinks, your feet stink and Jesus hates you. You know?” A pair of headphones wrap around Borden’s neck. A white mane reaches his shoulders.

Mitchell Borden. Photo: Sam Rappaport

My audio recorder dies. I pull out my phone and open a voice memo. The yellow pad on my lap is mostly for show. Borden’s words are too quick and too many.

“You go, ‘you have to buy a car.’ Paranoia sets in. ‘I’m not gonna get fucked if I don’t have this car, if I don’t have white teeth, if I don’t have big boobs, if I don’t have this big dick *k.’ Borden jumps up from his seat and looks me in the eye. “So what are people doing?”

Before I can respond, Borden hunches his shoulders, tilts his head to the floor, and begins stomping loudly around the room.

“I see people walking around like that,” he shouts. “Why? Because they think they’re not sexy. They think they’ve lost — that this game, this pop culture game, they’ve lost! ‘I’m not going to get fucked. I don’t I’m not gonna get fucked.” Borden gently sinks back into his chair. “Give me a break, you know?

I nod, ready for more. But Borden crosses his hands and looks at his knees. I check my phone to see if it’s still recording.

“You trust that more than yourself.” Borden shows my phone.

I shrug my shoulders. He is right.

“What if I did an interview like this…” Her face brightens. He gives me an impersonation of a reporter conducting an interview, constantly checking his phone. “When I see that, I feel like kicking those things, a karate kick, you know, smashing them like a pull bar.”

Borden grew up on a farm in Freehold, New Jersey. He never wore diapers, he shit in an addiction, and he didn’t really care about comparing himself to others.

“The thing is, I was very small,” Borden says. “I couldn’t play sports. So I started right away. I said, ‘I’m not in competition.’

Borden’s rejection of the competition proved infectious. This is what won him devotees in high school. And that continues to be a guiding principle.

“I just want to go in, deeper, deeper,” he says. “I don’t want the things other people want – or are told they want.”

Money is one of the things Borden doesn’t want.

“I’ve always been penniless,” says Borden. “But who else has been penniless? Bartok, Mozart… Beethoven was finally penniless. Does it matter how much money you have?

Another thing is retirement.

“‘Oh, you need 500k to retire.'” Borden smiled. “Retire and do what, you know? Do you sit on a lawn chair in the sun? ! If you don’t do anything because you’re so afraid of not having money, it will kill you. It will kill your soul.

Borden is silent again, looks at his knees. He went inside for a moment. An immeasurable moment.

Sometimes when I’m here listening to music, I tell Borden I can’t find that one.

“It’s the drummer’s fault.” Borden lights up. He fires sticks into the air and maniacally starts breaking an invisible battery. “Drummers ruin every song if they don’t listen and play loud. Who wants to hear that, them getting high? »

Do you have a philosophy on jazz – what is it? I ask.

“I only have one philosophy,” Borden says with focused intensity. “It’s that when the right person works with the wrong means, the wrong means work the right way.”

I nod and try to sort that sentence out in my head.

“If you’re true to yourself, if you’re expressing something from your subconscious form – something that gives up the ghost…” Borden reaches up and grabs something I can’t see. He hugs her and twists his arm. I imagine him extracting someone’s beating heart. “…Then you can take the wrong ways and make them work the right way.”

And what about luck, I ask. What role does that play in everything?

“Luck is everything!” Borden shouts. “I’m the guy in this Mark Twain short story where, you know, he falls and it looks like a charge and they win the war. I’m so fallible…stupid…all kinds of mistakes. I always work with the wrong means. But when you stay with them, people recognize it. ‘Wow, this guy is serious. He will try to make it work no matter what.

I look at Borden, searching for one last question.

Are you a misanthrope? I ask.

He sighs.

“I definitely don’t like society, you know, the way it is.” Borden pauses for another exhale, then he clears. “Listen, everyone wants to be immortal. Everyone wants to leave their mark on humanity. I’m desperately interested. I want everyone to start realizing that we can grow on a spiritual level.

Yes, I tell him, and where to start?

“It’s very simple,” says Borden. “Don’t be led astray by bullies. Get an Emily Dickinson book. And I hate to say throw away your phone, but that would be a start.

A woman emerges from the stairs and picks up a set of chess from a nearby table. Borden asks if there’s anyone downstairs and the woman shakes her head. I stop the voice memo and pocket my phone. Borden follows the woman downstairs.

The main Ornithology room is empty. It’s still early, the musicians haven’t arrived. The woman is now sitting on a stool, playing chess with the bartender. Borden is leaning on the bar, his head resting on his hands, watching the game unfold. I break the silence to say goodbye.

There is a gentle rain on the way back. My mind goes to the New Year. No plans. It’s sad, and it’s relieving. I pull out my phone and place an order on Amazon for “The Collected Poems of Emily Dickinson.” Then I put the phone back in my pocket and tell myself I won’t look at it again until I type my notes.


Mitchell Borden also opened Manhattan’s iconic jazz club Smalls in 1994 and Fat Cat in 2000. Read more about Borden and Ornithology Jazz Club here.


Featured Image: A Mitchell Borden illustration drawn by Emily Rappaport.

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The Inaugural Jazz Music Awards: Celebrating the Spirit of Jazz is scheduled for October 2022 https://jazzfin.com/the-inaugural-jazz-music-awards-celebrating-the-spirit-of-jazz-is-scheduled-for-october-2022/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/the-inaugural-jazz-music-awards-celebrating-the-spirit-of-jazz-is-scheduled-for-october-2022/ Wendy Williams, Managing Director of Jazz 91.9 WCLK (Photo credit: Lenna Davis from Lenna Davis Photography) * The inauguration Jazz Music Awards: Celebrating the Spirit of Jazz announced its awards ceremony, scheduled for Saturday 22 October 2022, to Cobb Energy Performing Arts Center in the subway in Atlanta, Georgia. For five decades, the venue has […]]]>


Wendy Williams, Managing Director of Jazz 91.9 WCLK (Photo credit: Lenna Davis from Lenna Davis Photography)

* The inauguration Jazz Music Awards: Celebrating the Spirit of Jazz announced its awards ceremony, scheduled for Saturday 22 October 2022, to Cobb Energy Performing Arts Center in the subway in Atlanta, Georgia. For five decades, the venue has hosted Broadway shows, ballets, concerts, operas and more.

Presented by Jazz 91.9 WCLK, a public radio station licensed at Clark University in Atlanta and known as “Atlanta’s Jazz Station,” the Jazz Music Awards (JMA) will be a dynamic presentation that recognizes the iconic spirit of jazz by shining the spotlight on mainstream and contemporary jazz musicians who continue to make a mark on music and the industry. Hosts, artists, presenters and special award winners will be announced at a later date.

The Jazz Music Awards will recognize a wide range of creators from the national and international jazz world, from traditional and contemporary musicians, singers and major groups, to composers, to individual songs and to complete albums. The eligibility period for the 2022 Awards Ceremony begins from April 1, 2021 to March 31, 2022. Online submissions will begin on New Years Day, Saturday January 1, 2022, through Thursday, March 31, 2022. Categories of prices are as follows: Best Mainstream Artist, Best Contemporary Artist, Best Duo, Group or Big Band, Best New Jazz Artist (contemporary or general public), Best Jazz Singer, Bis an International Artist (contemporary or general public), Best Mainstream Album, Best Contemporary Album, Jazz innovator of the year, Composer of the Year, Educator of the Year, Jazz Legacy Award, and Song of the year (Fan vote).

“In the 47 years that WCLK has been on the air, we have performed and specialized in all genres of jazz,” says Wendy williams, Managing Director of WCLK, who has been at the helm for 27 years. We play mainstream, contemporary, fusion, direct and modern jazz. We have gone through the whole range. This is the history of the resort and quite frankly, the secret of our success. We are still standing. And for over fifteen years, we have supplemented our show with the presentation of live jazz concerts, which have helped support the operations of our NPR member nonprofit public radio station. We’ve always enjoyed the sold-out crowds and the joy listeners feel when they see us at concerts.

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Rushion McDonald, Founder of 3815 Media (Photo courtesy of WCLK Radio)

Williams and David Linton, station’s program director and former record company director, contacted Rushion McDonald, the founder of 3815 Media, who will lead production on the next Starry Celebration. A two-time Emmy Award-winning executive producer and three-time NAACP Image Award winner, McDonald is the host of the popular “Money Making Conversations” podcast. 3815 Media will produce the Jazz Music Awards and its red carpet event with plans to launch a live TV show worldwide.

McDonald’s is the architect behind the production of multimedia platforms for major clients, including Steve Harvey’s career and the blockbuster Hoodie Awards, later renamed Neighborhood Awards. Her extensive work as a writer and producer also includes collaborations with other famous talents such as Kevin Hart, Taraji P. Henson, Gabrielle Union, Mo’Nique, Tia and Tamara Mowry, Stephen A. Smith, Jamie Foxx and others from New York. City in Hollywood. He has also created national media campaigns for State Farm, Ford, JC Penny, General Mills, iHeart Radio, Radio One, NBC, BET and ABC networks, to name a few. For more information on Rushion McDonald, visit rushionmcdonald.com.

Jazz 91.9 WCLK Program Director David C Linton (Photo credit: Reginald Duncan of Cranium Creation)

Linton says, “This is an exciting time in the 47 year history of Jazz 91.9 WCLK. I worked with this station as a label manager and I know how pivotal this has been in the careers of so many artists, especially jazz artists, and it still is today. When Wendy told me about returning to the station as Program Director in 2018, I was thrilled. Now to have the opportunity to help write another chapter in WCLK history is an honor. Now is the time for the Jazz Music Awards and WCLK is well positioned to present this long overdue awards show. It will be a historic and momentous event for all those who love jazz. “

Three-time Grammy Award winner and NEA Jazz Master Terri Lyne Carrington (Photo credit: Delphine Diallo)

The Jazz Music Awards committee was awarded a three-time Grammy Award-winning recording artist and NEA Jazz Master, Terri Lyne Carrington, who will lead the musical direction and act as a consultant for the first-ever awards ceremony. With his technical magic and deep creativity, Carrington has become one of the giants of jazz music today. A multi-talented drummer, songwriter, producer and educator, Carrington began her professional career at age ten and received a full scholarship from Berklee College of Music at age eleven. Her artistry and commitment to education have earned her honorary doctorates from the Manhattan School of Music and Berklee College of Music, where she is currently the Founder and Artistic Director of the Berklee Institute of Jazz and Gender Justice.

To date, she has released eight career albums. She is the first female artist to win the Grammy Award for best jazz instrumental album, which she received for her 2013 project, Money Jungle: Provocative in blue. Since starting her career, she has worked as a popular musician in New York City and then moved to Los Angeles, where she was recognized on late night television as the house drummer for “The Arsenio Hall. Show “and Quincy Jones. ‘VIBE TV’ program, hosted by Sinbad. To date, Carrington has performed on over a hundred recordings and has been a model and advocate for young women and men internationally through her teaching and touring careers. She has worked extensively with jazz giants and legends including Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, Al Jarreau, Stan Getz, Woody Shaw, Clark Terry, Cassandra Wilson, Dianne Reeves, James Moody, Joe Sample, Esperanza Spalding, and more. . For more information on Terri Lyne Carrington, visit terrilynecarrington.com.

“There is so much excitement and anticipation around the Jazz Music Awards,” said Williams. “I have always known that Terri Lyne is an incredible talent and a very accomplished drummer, composer and educator. The more I remove the layers, I am fascinated that she has covered so much territory in her career. She is also a much sought-after Music Director for prestigious large-scale jazz and musical productions around the world. And we all know she’s performed with and directed some of the best and that’s why she’s perfect for our inaugural awards show.

As a presenter of live jazz shows over the years, sold out at some of Atlanta’s biggest concert halls and hosting annual benefit shows, WCLK began presenting artists with its Jazz Legacy. Award. In recent years, Williams has noticed, as he travels the musical landscape, that there is a dearth of large award ceremonies honoring the creativity and work of one of the earliest forms of indigenous musical art in America: jazz. Much like Williams, the Linton program director, and her team began to think about hosting a bigger celebration of jazz, COVID-19 has put all performances on hiatus. “These musicians were sidelined for a year and a half, and the audience missed something,” she says. “I felt we should come back big. “

Additionally, Williams says, the event will include an educational component on the Clark University Atlanta campus, as well as a black-tie awards gala at the Cobb Center on Friday, October 21, 2022, the day before the awards ceremony. prices. Friday’s program will feature interactive sessions from world-renowned experts in the field of jazz, and classes will also include small-group workshops led by leading creators from the music and performing arts industries for students. high school and college students as well as the public.

“Participants will be able to learn and glean something that is happening in the jazz music industry from some of the best,” says Williams. “So we want to make it a stimulating and spectacular weekend that uplifts and promotes this music. “As soon as COVID was lifted, you saw artists on the road again and jazz festivals were back. Now, it’s a collective way to have them all on one stage loved, to be celebrated the same way we see it at other music awards shows. We need to.

For more information and updates on the Jazz Music Awards and Jazz 91.9 WCLK, visit: wclk.com.


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The icon of the Mont Airy jazz club, Marine, pioneer, dies at 98 https://jazzfin.com/the-icon-of-the-mont-airy-jazz-club-marine-pioneer-dies-at-98/ https://jazzfin.com/the-icon-of-the-mont-airy-jazz-club-marine-pioneer-dies-at-98/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/the-icon-of-the-mont-airy-jazz-club-marine-pioneer-dies-at-98/ by Len Lear Benjamin L. Bynum Sr., longtime Mount Airy resident, who brought countless bold names to his North Philly jazz club, the Cadillac Club, from 1965 to 1977, and whose sons helped run a series of restaurants and concert halls in Philly, including two in Chestnut Hill, for more than three decades, died of […]]]>


by Len Lear

Benjamin L. Bynum Sr., longtime Mount Airy resident, who brought countless bold names to his North Philly jazz club, the Cadillac Club, from 1965 to 1977, and whose sons helped run a series of restaurants and concert halls in Philly, including two in Chestnut Hill, for more than three decades, died of age-related illnesses on October 19 at the age of 98.

In his twenties, Bynum joined the Montford Point Marines, the first African-American unit of the US Marines, starting in 1942. He began his entrepreneurial career in bars and cafes in North Philadelphia and in Germantown. In 1965, he opened the Cadillac Club at 3738 Germantown Ave., and it quickly became the hottest jazz club in town.

Some of the stars who played at the Cadillac Club were Nina Simone, BB King, Redd Foxx, Kenny Gamble, Woody Herman, Count Basie, Gladys Knight, Fats Domino, George Benson, Billy Paul, The Stylistics and even the Soul Queen, Aretha Franklin.

Billy Paul, who lived near 16th Street and South Street at the time, held the country’s number one record in December 1972, “Me and Mrs. Jones”. Paul was so grateful to Mr. Bynum for the career boost he provided that Paul called his debut album “Feelin ‘Good at the Cadillac Club”.

In an interview in 1978, Paul told me, “Mr. Bynum is a wonderful man who has helped so many artists and brought so much class to Philly. His wife, Ruth, looked after the finances, and his sons, Robert and Benjamin Jr. also worked there. There was no better place to play. All musicians have sad stories about the club owners who scammed them, but not Mr. Bynum. He treated everyone fairly.

Due to changing musical tastes and the popularity of disco in the 1970s, the Cadillac Club was transformed into the Impulse nightclub in 1977, which the family closed in 1991. In a previous interview, Benjamin Jr. recalled how as a young boy he met performers like Gladys Knight & the Pips, who regularly visited the family home in Mt. Airy when they were in town playing Cadillac: “Most of the time I was in bed. Most of the time I look at pictures and remember stories about how my mom got Aretha Franklin’s ears for the evening. But honestly, I don’t even remember how old I was when it happened. “

The two sons, who both attended Central High School, followed in their father’s jazzy footsteps in 1990 when they opened Zanzibar Blue, a jazz restaurant / club at 11th and Spruce Streets. In 1996, the Bynum brothers moved Zanzibar Blue to a location below the Bellevue Hotel, but they closed it in 2007. Benjamin Jr. said at the time: “We didn’t think he was in. our interest in renewing the lease.

In 1995, the Bynum brothers also opened Warmdaddy’s, another music restaurant, on Front Street in Old Town, moving it 10 years later to a complex in Pennsport that also houses the Riverview Cinema. While the sons had previously worked for their father at the Cadillac Club, at Warmdaddy the roles were turned and Ben Sr. worked for them. He worked at the club’s doorstep every Friday and Saturday night, even after Warmdaddy’s moved into his second home in Pennsport.

In August of last year, the Bynums closed Warmdaddy’s, attributing the move to the pandemic, but they have since moved to 1410 Mt. Vernon St. in Fairmount, next to the South Restaurant and Jazz Club, which the Bynums have opened. in 2015.

The Bynum brothers also own and operate Relish, a music and dining venue located at 7162 Ogontz Ave. at West Oak Lane. And they’ve been involved for a while with Al Paris in Heirloom, a BYOB fine-dining restaurant next to the State Store on top of the hill from 2011 to 2015 and Paris Bistro & Jazz Club next to the Chestnut Hill hotel from January 2014, until March 2020, victim of the pandemic. (Veteran Chestnut Hill restaurateurs Rob and Vanessa Mullen took over Paris Bistro in 2018. Bynum was already gone, with Al Paris in full control.)

Benjamin Bynum Sr. continued to work until he was 90 and said he would never fully retire. His sons certainly carry on the family tradition of providing good music and good food. His wife, Ruth, died at age 80 in 2005. Besides his sons, he is survived by a brother, James, who is 100 years old (sister, Zellen, died last year at 102); his partner, Thelma Peake, and daughters Antoinette, Benita and Denee and nine grandchildren, seven great grandchildren and one great great grandchild.

Len Lear can be contacted at lenlear@chestnuthilllocal.com.


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A look inside a Philly jazz club https://jazzfin.com/a-look-inside-a-philly-jazz-club/ Wed, 03 Nov 2021 03:47:52 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/a-look-inside-a-philly-jazz-club/ Especially for many young people, jazz has not been fresh since its heyday in the 1940s. “I wish more people would give it a chance,” said Dan Green, director of the SJU Jazz Band. “There is a lot of dance music [now] where I understand why people want to go to a club and dance. […]]]>


Especially for many young people, jazz has not been fresh since its heyday in the 1940s.

“I wish more people would give it a chance,” said Dan Green, director of the SJU Jazz Band. “There is a lot of dance music [now] where I understand why people want to go to a club and dance. But the quality of the music or the substance of the music is not really there.

I’ve been in jazz since I was in high school, but mostly as background music for my studies. I’ve never been to a concert, my listening experience was limited to my Spotify playlists, mostly filled with big bands like the Count Basie Orchestra or the Glenn Miller Orchestra, as well as Ray Charles, Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong .

Philadelphia has a rich jazz history that has produced many famous jazz musicians, Green noted, including some popular favorites like John Coltraine, who moved to Philadelphia in 1943, and Billie Holiday, who was born in Philadelphia in 1915.

SuedeLace singer Shay Love performs their set.

Philadelphia was also a hub for some popular jazz shows, which hosted a number of big names in jazz at the time. Duke Ellington, Cab Calloway, and Benny Goodman were popular performers at the Earle Theater, once located on the southeast corner of S. 11th Street and Market Street in the heyday of jazz. Today, artists and jazz enthusiasts tend to frequent downtown clubs like Chris’s Jazz Cafe, South Jazz Kitchen, and Time Restaurant.

Larger jazz clubs can be a bit more expensive, with some shows at places like Chris’ costing over $ 65 for a full dinner and a show if you decide to do it all. This does not include the cost of transportation to town and a few extra dollars for drinks for students 21 and older. I wanted to find a smaller, more economical club closer to campus like The Bayou.

For SuedeLace, performing at these small clubs, especially after forming their group in the midst of the pandemic, provides a great space to get their name out there.

Dominic Wilkins (top) plays the keys while Devante Gainse, known as Swingg, plays the drums during their set. PHOTOS: MITCHELL SHIELDS ’22 / THE FALCON

“Small venues like this can become legendary, and that’s where talent is born. You never know what the potential or the trajectory of the artists will be, ”Love said. “So these types of places make room for these opportunities and they really matter. “

After about an hour of listening, more and more people began to enter through the front door and fill the Bayou. My friend and I decided it was time to give up our place on the couch we had chosen earlier in the evening and make room for more people to come in and play with SuedeLace.

Green is right, the Philadelphia jazz scene deserves a chance. I suggest taking a Friday night to hang out on campus and check out a few local clubs. The Bayou is a great place to start.

SuedeLace performs every Friday night at Bayou (5025 Baltimore Ave) from 8 p.m. after Happy Hour at Bayou from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. For more on the artists, you can follow the group and individual artists Shay Love, Kenny RP, Dominic Wilkins and Swingg on Instagram.


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The Django, the premier jazz club in downtown Manhattan, hosts the return of the weekly Mingus Big Band residency https://jazzfin.com/the-django-the-premier-jazz-club-in-downtown-manhattan-hosts-the-return-of-the-weekly-mingus-big-band-residency/ https://jazzfin.com/the-django-the-premier-jazz-club-in-downtown-manhattan-hosts-the-return-of-the-weekly-mingus-big-band-residency/#respond Tue, 26 Oct 2021 13:52:51 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/the-django-the-premier-jazz-club-in-downtown-manhattan-hosts-the-return-of-the-weekly-mingus-big-band-residency/ Downtown Manhattan’s premier jazz club, The Django, today announced a new showcase for the music of legendary composer / bassist / conductor Charles Mingus. Starting in October, Jazz Workshop (the Mingus organization) rekindled its weekly celebration at Django with Tuesday night appearances by the Grammy Award-winning Mingus Big Band. (The eclectic Mingus Orchestra will also […]]]>


Downtown Manhattan’s premier jazz club, The Django, today announced a new showcase for the music of legendary composer / bassist / conductor Charles Mingus. Starting in October, Jazz Workshop (the Mingus organization) rekindled its weekly celebration at Django with Tuesday night appearances by the Grammy Award-winning Mingus Big Band. (The eclectic Mingus Orchestra will also be present in December). This new and extended engagement marks the return of a vital cultural institution and artistic stronghold in New York’s music community.

“We are thrilled to have this opportunity to reignite Mingus’ vital weekly celebration and bring back what has for years been one of the highlights of the New York jazz scene,” said Ken Fowser, Music Director of The Django. “It is an honor to provide a platform where the music and legacy of Mingus can continue to flourish. We look forward to welcoming the dynamic musicians, spirit and repertoire of Mingus, as well as their loyal fans. in our club every week for the foreseeable future. “Boris Kozlov, the band’s bassist and musical director agrees:” We are so lucky to be sharing Mingus’ music and playing live at Django. We are delighted to reconnect with our audience in this beautiful venue as we prepare for the Mingus centenary celebration in April 2022. “

Made up of a rotating family of brilliant musicians, the 14-piece Mingus Big Band has a long history as a stronghold of New York’s jazz community. He performed Thursday nights from 1991 to 2004 at Fez under Time Cafe in New York City, and later every week at Joe’s Pub and Iridium. More recently, Mingus Mondays were celebrated for nearly 12 years at Jazz Standard, interrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic and the club’s closure in December 2020. The popular series was hailed as “probably the best in the whole world” (LucidCulture), “the one you can’t miss” (TravelRamblr) and “a great way to spend a night out anytime” (KYOU Radio).

Recognized as one of the greatest composers of music of the 20th century, Charles Mingus (1922-79) wrote the second largest body of work, after Ellington, of all American composers. His archives were acquired by the Library of Congress – a first for jazz and a first for an African-American composer. Mingus’ music has been kept alive through the efforts of his widow Sue Mingus, who has long championed his work through performance, editing, education (including the annual Charles Mingus festival for high school musicians) and archival efforts; working with Mingus Alumni such as Sy Johnson and Jack Walrath, and instrumentalists led by Mingus group leaders Alex Foster and Boris Kozlov. In American music history, Mingus made signature statements in support of the civil rights movement through his compositions such as the protest song, “Fables of Faubus,” which spoke of the 1959 event in during which the governor of Arkansas prevented the integration of a local high school. According to All About Jazz, “Mingus’ creations were radically, almost shockingly original when first heard.” The ever-growing audience around the world is a testament to Mingus Music’s infallible timelessness.

“Charles Mingus’ music contains multitudes. His compositions are among the most personal and varied in music, sweeping the country bringing together in their wake the sounds of Dixieland, bebop, Latin rhythms, swing, romantic ballads , West Coast jazz, European classical forms, African folklore, all rich in melodies, all imbued with blues, ranging from the most tumultuous emotions to the deepest intimacy of the soul. ” – Sue Mingus

The performances will take place every Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. + 9:30 p.m. (doors open at 7:00 p.m.)

Where: The Django, 2 Avenue of the Americas (Cellar Level at The Roxy Hotel), New York City, NY, Trains: A / C / N / Q / R / W to Canal, 2/3 to Franklin , 1 to Chambers

Tickets: $ 20 per person (and a minimum of two drinks required). To book, visit TheDjangoNYC.com or call 212.519.6649.


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