jazz artists – Jazz Fin http://jazzfin.com/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 14:15:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://jazzfin.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-14-150x150.png jazz artists – Jazz Fin http://jazzfin.com/ 32 32 Listen to jazz music this fall in the Edison district of Kalamazoo https://jazzfin.com/listen-to-jazz-music-this-fall-in-the-edison-district-of-kalamazoo/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 07:58:19 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/listen-to-jazz-music-this-fall-in-the-edison-district-of-kalamazoo/ Editor’s Note: This story is part of Southwest Michigan Second Wave’s On the Edison field series. The Edison district will become jazzy. Kalamazoo’s most populous neighborhood is looking to kick off a one-of-a-kind jazz festival in September featuring local artists as well as talented jazz artists from beyond. “It’s about providing a quality of life […]]]>
Editor’s Note: This story is part of Southwest Michigan Second Wave’s On the Edison field series.

The Edison district will become jazzy.

Kalamazoo’s most populous neighborhood is looking to kick off a one-of-a-kind jazz festival in September featuring local artists as well as talented jazz artists from beyond.

“It’s about providing a quality of life in the neighborhood,” says Stephen Dupuie, executive director of the Edison Neighborhood Association. “When I think of quality of life, I think of arts and culture and the environment that people grow up in. So by doing this festival, we’re literally putting it on the streets and making it accessible to everyone for free. .”

Singer, songwriter and lyricist Fay Victor at home. She’ll be at the Edison Jazz Festival this fall.Dupuie says the festival will be a three-day event that will take place at three locations in Edison. There will be performances at City of Jerico, the recovered part of the factory district of the district. Located in the 1500 block of Fulford Street, it is now home to contractors, artisans and tradespeople. Another day, plans call for a block party with music, food trucks and a musical parade down Egleston Avenue (one section is to be closed for the day).

“Anyone who wishes can participate with their own instruments,” Dupuis says of the parade.

And a third day will feature rooftop performances atop the Creamery Building, the neighborhood’s new residential and commercial development. The $14.7 million affordable housing project opened last year at 1101 Portage Street. Rooftop performances must be followed by an event at the Theater of the Loir.

“We lined up the venues and we lined up the performers when it came to people coming from out of town,” Dupuie says. “They are confirmed.”

The neighborhood association is now looking to raise approximately $25,000 which it needs to organize the festival. He hopes to find multiple donors. Those interested in making a contribution can do so by contacting the association at 269-382-0916 and visit his website. Individuals can click on any donation button and add a note that their contribution should be used for the Jazz Festival.

ASCAP Award-winning singer, songwriter, bandleader and producer Estar Cohen is also an improv comedy musician. She’ll be at the Edison Jazz Festival this fall.Among the recognized artists, the festival will feature internationally acclaimed bassist, bandleader and recording artist John Hebert; singer, songwriter and lyricist Fay Victor; and Estar Cohen, ASCAP Award-winning singer, songwriter, bandleader and producer. ASCAP – the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers – is an association of more than 850,000 American songwriters, composers and music publishers.

The event will also focus on showcasing the work of unsung black artists and honor the music of late jazz artist Herbie Nichols, a 1950s African-American improvisational artist who wanted to be a concert composer. but was denied access to Industry.

“These are the people who are sort of the big names lined up,” and he says, “There will be a lot of local artists as well.”

With over 9,000 residents and located just south and east of downtown Kalamazoo along Portage Street, Edison is Kalamazoo’s most populous neighborhood and considered its most diverse neighborhood. According to the 2016 census, it is 49% Caucasian, 28% African American and 19% Hispanic. This has made it a place with a lot of interest in culture and music.

The jazz festival is an outgrowth of what has become a popular Tuesday night jazz jam at the Dormouse Theater, a 200-seat theater at 1030 Portage St. at Washington Square in Edison. The theater will be a jazz festival venue.The Jazz Festival is one of them, an outgrowth of what has become a popular Tuesday night jazz jam at the Dormouse Theater, a 200-seat theater at 1030 Portage St. in Edison’s Washington Square neighborhood that serves as a venue for live entertainment and features performers and musicians. It opened last summer.

Dupuis was named chief executive of the neighborhood association earlier this year after serving on the board for about five years. He is the artistic director of the Dormouse Theater Group.

Speaking of jazz music, Dupuie says, “It naturally moved to the Loir.”

Jazz mavens and music students at Western Michigan University began hosting Tuesday night jazz jam sessions at the Dormouse Theater last year after the Union Cabaret & Grill closed. There were live music nights featuring jazz artists.

A concert on the roof of the Creamery will be part of the jazz festival.What should we think of this new event?

“First of all, it’s going to be a lot of fun,” says Dupuis. “Everything will happen at Edison. …People are going to see parts of the neighborhood that they may not have seen before because if they’re not from the neighborhood why would they go into that little pocket.

Speaking of Jerico Town as an example, he says, “This little pocket has a cafe, makerspaces, and stuff that’s off the beaten path. And so I really want people to think about how fun the event is going to be and all the different new places that they might not have been to because it’s not necessarily in their trajectory of places they are going.

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City meets country at the Down South Jazz Club | Bega District News https://jazzfin.com/city-meets-country-at-the-down-south-jazz-club-bega-district-news/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 06:48:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/city-meets-country-at-the-down-south-jazz-club-bega-district-news/ what is happening, things to do, It’s a special night for jazz lovers on Thursday 24th February when the Down South Jazz Club performs ‘City Meets Country’ at Club Sapphire Merimbula. The show will begin with an exquisite first trio installment featuring three of Australia’s finest musicians, Peter Locke (piano), Rob Brice (guitar) and Mike […]]]>

what is happening, things to do,

It’s a special night for jazz lovers on Thursday 24th February when the Down South Jazz Club performs ‘City Meets Country’ at Club Sapphire Merimbula. The show will begin with an exquisite first trio installment featuring three of Australia’s finest musicians, Peter Locke (piano), Rob Brice (guitar) and Mike Walsh (bass), who will then be joined by two fabulous local musicians; Ken Vatcher (drums) and Paul Dion (reeds) for a selection of favorite swing jazz standards and a sprinkling of original compositions by Peter and Paul. Peter Locke, Rob Brice and Mike Walsh are a rare occurrence in music, each performing internationally in a variety of musical contexts and both considered masters of their respective crafts. When they play together, they create a unique connection that reaches audiences of all ages and genres, resulting in unexpected musical serendipities. Peter, Rob and Mike introduce audiences to new repertoire, including originals and classic arrangements of jazz standards. Peter Locke is a highly respected professional performer with many years of experience having performed with the Daly Wilson Big Band, Brad Charles Big Band and John Morrison’s Swing City, among others. He was also resident jazz pianist at the City Tattersall’s Club in Sydney for around seven years and accompanied many of Australia’s finest jazz singers. He has played for the Down South Jazz Club many times in the past with artists like Marie Wilson, Di Bird, Johnny Nicol, Bob Barnard, Benny’s Boys. Rob Brice is a highly accomplished guitarist who has played with top jazz artists including the late Bernie McGann, Bob Gebhart, Delilah, Ike Isaacs (of Stephane Grappelli) and Tony Barnard’s guitar ensemble. In the commercial world, he has worked with Dionne Warwick and Australian Colleen Hewitt. Mike Walsh (acoustic bass) has performed at many jazz venues in Sydney including the Basement and the Hilton Hotel, performing with many of Sydney’s top jazz musicians and has also performed at many Sydney and regional festivals in Australia and New Zealand, including Napier’s Art Deco Festival. The second parenthesis brings together these three excellent musicians with two very popular local musicians. Multi-instrumentalist Paul Dion and drummer Ken Vatcher are well known in the area and no strangers to the Down South Jazz Club. Paul has appeared at DSJC on several occasions, the last being in December 2020 when he joined other local musicians at Club Sapphire’s Rockpool. Ken’s last appearance for DSJC was in May of last year. He is the drummer of choice for many guest artists who rely on local musicians for a rhythm section. Ken is also the drummer for what appears to be at least half of the bands that regularly work in this area. This rare opportunity to meet the city’s country artists will cost $15 for jazz club members and $25 for visitors. Bookings can be made by emailing bookings@downsouthjazzclub.org.au or using the form on the WhatsOn page on the DSJC website. You can also call Aileen Walsh on 02 6495 9853, or just show up in the evening and pay at the door. The Club Sapphire bistro opens at 5:30 p.m. for those who wish to have a meal first.

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City meets country at the Down South Jazz Club | Magnet https://jazzfin.com/city-meets-country-at-the-down-south-jazz-club-magnet/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 06:48:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/city-meets-country-at-the-down-south-jazz-club-magnet/ City meets country: clockwise, Peter Locke top right, Mike Walsh, Rob Brice, Ken Vatcher and Paul Dion. It’s a special night for jazz lovers on Thursday 24th February when the Down South Jazz Club performs ‘City Meets Country’ at Club Sapphire Merimbula. The show will begin with an exquisite first trio installment featuring three of […]]]>

City meets country: clockwise, Peter Locke top right, Mike Walsh, Rob Brice, Ken Vatcher and Paul Dion.

It’s a special night for jazz lovers on Thursday 24th February when the Down South Jazz Club performs ‘City Meets Country’ at Club Sapphire Merimbula.

The show will begin with an exquisite first trio installment featuring three of Australia’s finest musicians, Peter Locke (piano), Rob Brice (guitar) and Mike Walsh (bass), who will then be joined by two fabulous local musicians; Ken Vatcher (drums) and Paul Dion (reeds) for a selection of favorite swing jazz standards and a sprinkling of original compositions by Peter and Paul.

Peter Locke, Rob Brice and Mike Walsh are a rare occurrence in music, each performing internationally in a variety of musical contexts and both considered masters of their respective crafts.

When they play together, they create a unique connection that reaches audiences of all ages and genres, resulting in unexpected musical serendipities.

Peter, Rob and Mike introduce audiences to new repertoire including originals and classic arrangements of jazz standards.

Peter Locke is a highly respected professional performer with many years of experience having performed with the Daly Wilson Big Band, Brad Charles Big Band and John Morrison’s Swing City, among others. He was also resident jazz pianist at the City Tattersall’s Club in Sydney for around seven years and accompanied many of Australia’s finest jazz singers. He has played for the Down South Jazz Club several times in the past with artists like Marie Wilson, Di Bird, Johnny Nicol, Bob Barnard, Benny’s Boys.

Rob Brice is a highly accomplished guitarist who has played with top jazz artists including the late Bernie McGann, Bob Gebhart, Delilah, Ike Isaacs (of Stephane Grappelli) and Tony Barnard’s guitar ensemble. In the commercial world, he has worked with Dionne Warwick and Australian Colleen Hewitt.

Mike Walsh (acoustic bass) has performed at many jazz venues in Sydney including the Basement and the Hilton Hotel, performing with many of Sydney’s top jazz musicians and has also performed at many Sydney and regional festivals in Australia and New Zealand, including Napier’s Art Deco Festival.

The second parenthesis brings together these three excellent musicians with two very popular local musicians.

Multi-instrumentalist Paul Dion and drummer Ken Vatcher are well known in the area and no strangers to the Down South Jazz Club. Paul has appeared at DSJC on several occasions, the last being in December 2020 when he joined other local musicians at Club Sapphire’s Rockpool.

Ken’s last appearance for DSJC was in May of last year. He is the drummer of choice for many guest artists who rely on local musicians for a rhythm section. Ken is also the drummer for what appears to be at least half of the bands that regularly work in this area.

This rare opportunity to meet the city’s country artists will cost $15 for jazz club members and $25 for visitors. Bookings can be made by emailing bookings@downsouthjazzclub.org.au or using the form on the WhatsOn page on the DSJC website. You can also call Aileen Walsh on 02 6495 9853, or just show up in the evening and pay at the door. The Club Sapphire bistro opens at 5:30 p.m. for those who wish to have a meal first.

This story City meets country at the Down South Jazz Club
first appeared on Merimbula News Weekly.
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A hallowed London jazz club comes to life on screen https://jazzfin.com/a-hallowed-london-jazz-club-comes-to-life-on-screen/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 22:54:24 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/a-hallowed-london-jazz-club-comes-to-life-on-screen/ Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club was an enduring beacon of musical genius in London. Any self-respecting jazzman had to make the pilgrimage to the place at its peak in the 1960s. Musicians too: Miles Davis and Ella Fitzgerald played it, as well as Buddy Rich and Dizzy Gillespie. Scott, one of its benevolent owners, was as […]]]>

Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club was an enduring beacon of musical genius in London. Any self-respecting jazzman had to make the pilgrimage to the place at its peak in the 1960s. Musicians too: Miles Davis and Ella Fitzgerald played it, as well as Buddy Rich and Dizzy Gillespie.

Scott, one of its benevolent owners, was as sacred as the establishment itself, but remained a somewhat mysterious figure throughout its life. A charming tenor saxophonist with a warm demeanor and excellent comedic timing, he also had a gambling addiction and endured bouts of depression. Even those close to him didn’t feel like they connected with him.

“He was a very difficult person to get to know,” Paul Pace, the club’s current music bookings co-ordinator, said in an interview. “He was a very quiet and private man.”

Scott died in 1996 at the age of 69. The venue he opened with fellow saxophonist, Pete King, is still a hallowed hall among jazz clubs in the UK, and “Ronnie’s” a new documentary airing more widely in the US this week, offers a multi-dimensional view of Scott and the nightclub through the perspective of journalists, friends and musicians who knew him – and a host of live performance footage. The film celebrates how the place with narrow hallways and a small stage housed all manner of big performances, including Jimi Hendrix’s last concert before his death in 1970. And it reveals the secret to the venue’s success was in large part Scott, himself, who attracted customers as if he were an old friend who knew the best players of his time.

Tenor saxophonist Sonny Rollins first went to Ronnie Scott in the 1960s under a deal that allowed American musicians to play in UK venues and vice versa. This partnership was brokered by King, who served as the club’s manager and saw the need to book established jazz artists to attract larger crowds. His work paved the way for other notable artists, like tenor saxophonist Ben Webster and multi-instrumentalist Roland Kirk, to play there.

“A lot of people hadn’t seen me in Europe,” Rollins said in a phone interview. “It was my first time in London so I had a great time watching the scene. Every club has its own behavior and playing there was a wonderful experience. It was the place to go – the club of Ronnie Scott.

Scott, whose jazz career began as a teenager, helped open the club in 1959 after a trip to New York, where he heard Charlie Parker and Davis play Three Deuces along East 52nd Street. He was so seduced by the jazz emanating from the New York scene that he wanted to reproduce the atmosphere at home. “To walk into this little place and hear this band with this American sound that we’ve never really heard in person before – unbelievable,” Scott says in the film.

With the help of a £1,000 loan from Scott’s father-in-law, he and King opened the club as a basement venue on Gerrard Street in Soho, an area with cafes and venues open after working hours that catered to the British counterculture. Before that, the space had been used as a tea bar and toilets for taxi drivers. Scott and King saw it as a place where British jazz musicians could work material in a safe space – all strains of jazz were welcome – and be paid fairly, which was no small feat at that time. The club, which moved to a larger space on Firth Street in 1968, is known as the birthplace of British jazz.

Still, the narrative wasn’t all sunny: Ronnie Scott had good times and bad times financially, and was on the verge of shutting down at times until a last-minute lifeline kept the lights on. Then there was the matter of Scott’s game. “When things were really desperate,” King says in the film, “I used to come to work and there were guys in suits with notebooks there in the afternoon, noting down how much the piano was worth. , and how much the tables and chairs were worth. We were very close to having to forget everything.

The film’s director, Oliver Murray, heard many similar stories about Scott while making his documentary. “Several people told me that if he had been able to play the club on some occasions, he would have lost the club and then been completely devastated,” he said in an interview. “But that’s the complexity of the guy, just a real jazz man in that sense. He lives up to the stereotype of the musician with demons.

Murray was brought into the project by one of its producers, Eric Woollard-White, who frequented the club. One of Murray’s aims was to humanise Scott for a younger audience less familiar with the club’s heyday. “I wanted to do something that felt like a passing of the torch from one generation to the next,” Murray said. History seemed particularly ripe for this moment, when places are under threat due to ongoing pandemic challenges.

Ronnie Scott remains vital and “cultivates so much talent,” he explained. “It’s not necessarily just the people playing, but it gives the people of London a platform to see the best, and that in itself raises the caliber of what’s happening in the city.”

The second half of the documentary explains why Scott has remained so unknowable, focusing on the club owner’s mental health issues. In his dark times, King’s family cared for Scott. “You could never leave him alone,” King’s wife Stella says in the film. “Because you never knew if you were going to come back and he was dead.”

To shield his problems from the public, Scott would leave his club at 4 a.m. with no patrons present. Playing jazz would attenuate depressive episodes. But after a dentist replaced all of his teeth with porcelain dentures, hampering his ability to play sax and completely changing his sound, Scott collapsed.

King continued to run the club after Scott’s death and sold it to producer and restaurateur Sally Greene and entrepreneur Michael Watt in 2005. (King died in 2009.) Today, Ronnie Scott’s is still a mainstay of local and international jazz, with Scott’s original purpose intact: it’s a local place to experience something you’ve never heard before.

“I think that’s also why ‘Ronnie’s’ connects with people, not just in London, but all over Europe and now the world,” Murray said. Places like Ronnie Scott’s “were built by very motivated people”, he added. “There has certainly been blood, sweat and tears at these iconic locations that we may have taken for granted. And it took a pandemic to remind us to take care of them.

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Upcoming opening of the Jazz Club and Lounge inside the Congress Hotel (COCKTAIL MENU) https://jazzfin.com/upcoming-opening-of-the-jazz-club-and-lounge-inside-the-congress-hotel-cocktail-menu/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 18:12:35 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/upcoming-opening-of-the-jazz-club-and-lounge-inside-the-congress-hotel-cocktail-menu/ A HARMONIOUS BLEND OF MUSIC, MEZCAL, WINE AND COCKTAILS Missing from Tucson’s hitherto very active music scene, there was a place dedicated to jazz. The Hall of the Century, which is located inside the Hotel Congress, is set to open its doors for its first jazz concert on Friday, February 4. Photo courtesy of the […]]]>

A HARMONIOUS BLEND OF MUSIC, MEZCAL, WINE AND COCKTAILS

Missing from Tucson’s hitherto very active music scene, there was a place dedicated to jazz.

The Hall of the Century, which is located inside the Hotel Congress, is set to open its doors for its first jazz concert on Friday, February 4.

Photo courtesy of the Century Room at the Congress Hotel

The origin story of the club

In collaboration with the Rio Nuevo Board, The Century Room space was transformed into a state-of-the-art club that aims to add to the nightlife of downtown Tucson. Shana Oseran, partner of Hotel Congress with her husband richard since 1985, partly found the inspiration to develop the project thanks to the jazz drummer Arthur Vint.

Vint, originally from Tucson, spent 15 years in New York performing and working at jazz clubs like the blue note and Dizzy’s Club. Since 2020, he has been a professor of jazz drums at the University of Arizona.

“It’s always been a dream of mine to open my own club and Shana has included me in every aspect of the planning for the Century Room – it’s an exciting project that we’re excited to bring to the community,” said Came.

And all that

The dedicated jazz club opens in February with a lineup of live entertainment, including a variety of regional and national jazz artists performing throughout the year. Most evening performances will be ticketed concerts, which are shared in line to help you plan your experience.

The Century Room at the Congress Hotel

Photo courtesy of the Century Room at the Congress Hotel

“The Century Room has been so well received by all of my fellow musicians,” Vint said. “My friends in New York all want to come and perform here and my friends in Arizona are thrilled to have the opportunity to showcase their music in an authentic jazz club. It’s an amazing addition to downtown and Tucson in general.”

Mezcal, wine and cocktails, oh my

Ear candy aside, there will be plenty of likes coming from the bar and lounge inside the Century Room. The menu is full of drinks that will keep you coming back for more, like the Sonora Sazerac and the The Spirit of the Southwest, both of which have Tucson notes mixed in.

The Century Room at the Congress Hotel

Photo courtesy of the Century Room at the Congress Hotel

Century Room will also offer guided tastings of ancestral mezcals in small batches with a collection of seven Mata varieties, as well as Rancho Tapua Bacanora, Mazot Bacanora, Sotol Por Siembre, and more. Plus, a wide selection of local and Sonoran wines, locally brewed beers, and spirits will be available to you.

A menu of small bites will be available soon, but in the meantime, check out the different cocktail menus.

Exclusive cocktail menu

  • Tépache mullet – Hotel Congress Vodka, lime, tepache, ginger beer, pineapple
  • Sonora Sazerac – Whiskey Del Bac Dorado, Piloncillo, Angostura, Peychauds, Mezcal Banhez, Lemon, Orange, Tajin
  • The Spirit of the Southwest – Paranubes Agricole Rum, Uruapan Rum, Pineapple Plantation Rum, Ancho Reyes Poblano, Lemon, Mexican Coke
  • Meridian Jazz – Arette Tequila, Kalani Coconut, Lime, Pineapple, Reagans Orange, Himalayan Black Sea Salt

Exclusive cocktail menu

  • Smoke and mirrors – Hotel Congress Vodka, Nuestra Soledad Sotol, Cocchi Rosa, Regan’s Orange Bitters, Lemon, Citrus Smoke
  • old fashioned indigo – Empress Gin, Maple Syrup, Regans Orange Bitters, Angostura Bitters, Orange, Mezcal Banhez, Ghost Leaf
  • Earth Promise – Mezcal Banhez, Tequila Arette, Lime, Strega, Yellow Curry, Thai Chilli Oil
  • Noche De Los Muertos – Strawberry Washed Paranubes, Mezcal Banhez, Blood Orange, Meyer Lemon, Flying Lavender, Peychaud’s, Marigold
  • bite the bullet – Mezcal, Cocchi Torino Sweet Vermouth, Pierre Firand Dry Curacao, Allspice Dram, Mole, Vanilla Bean infused Del Bac Dorado
  • jazz hands – Xila Licor de Agave, Ancho Reyes Chile Liqueur, Lime, Orgeat, Pineapple, Egg White, Bittermans Hellfire Bitters, Orchid
  • Fernet and Coke – Fernet Vallet, Bourbon, Angostura Bitters, Mexican Coke, Smoked Vanilla
  • wild soul – Braulio, Cocchi Torino Sweet Vermouth, Banhez Mezcal, Monkey Shoulder Scotch, Passion Fruit, Peychauds, Orange
  • Curious confection – Washed Cacao Nib Banhez Mezcal, Ancho Reyes, Chocolate Liqueur, Horchata, Espresso Mousse, Cinnamon

Temperance menu

  • The cynic’s dilemma – Desert Forager Prickly Pear & Peach Shrub, apple cider vinegar, vanilla, Topo Chico, apple and cinnamon
  • fun bird – Cordial Carrot and Parsley, Lemon, Pineapple, Ginger Beer
  • Participation trophy – Beetroot, Local Honey, Lemon, Mango and Chili Tepache
Where is The Century Room located?

Upon entry, you will pass through the century-old double-door entrance on Congress Street and Fifth Avenue. Congress Hotel partner Shana Oseran considers the new jazz club a true labor of love and something that has gone through years of evolution at the hotel.

The Century Room at the Congress Hotel

Photo courtesy of the Century Room at the Congress Hotel

“The Historic Hotel Congress has been a leader in adaptive reuse since 1985,” Oseran said. “The Century Room occupies the space which over the years has housed the Valley National Bank, Stamp and Coin, bookstore, art gallery, Southwestern clothing manufacturer, men’s clothing store , the Copper Hall banquet hall and now Southern Arizona’s first dedicated jazz club. . We are pleased to introduce a third concert venue to the hotel, joining Club Congress and Hotel Congress Plaza. I think Tucson is ready for this one-of-a-kind location.

SHOWS PROGRAM FOR FEBRUARY AND MARCH 2022

friday 4 february
Latin Jazz Quartet Homero Cerón

Homero Cerón is a local legend who was the Principal Percussionist of the Tucson Symphony Orchestra for over 40 years. He brings his quartet to the Century Room to play a mix of Latin jazz originals and classics. He is accompanied by Amilcar Guevara (piano), Mike Levy (bass) and Danny Brito (drums).

monday 7 february
Tim Kliphus Gypsy Jazz Duos

Dutch violinist Tim Kliphuis returns to the Hotel Congress with guitarist Jimmy Grant for an encore performance of their gypsy jazz duets.

Friday February 11
Susan Artemis plays love songs from the dark side of the living room

Pianist and singer Susan Artemis brings her quartet for a special Valentine’s Day weekend concert to perform “Love Songs from the Dark Side of the Lounge.”

Saturday February 12
Dirty Dozen Brass Band Afterparty

This show follows Dirty Dozen’s “Mardi Gras Mambo” performance at the Fox Tucson Theater. Keep the party going at the Century Room with fantastic local musicians.

Friday February 18
Howard Alden Trio

Howard Alden is a world famous guitarist from New York who recently moved to Phoenix. He’s played with a who’s who of jazz legends, including Benny Carter, Clark Terry and Dizzy Gilespie, among others, and has won numerous accolades from Downbeat and JazzTimes. He recorded the soundtrack for Woody Allen’s 1999 film “Sweet and Lowdown” and trained Sean Penn for the role. He brings a trio to the Century Room to perform his favorite songs from his illustrious career.

Saturday February 26
Rob Boone “Blue Trombone: The Music of JJ Johnson”

Rob Boone is the first trombonist from Tucson who organized a tribute concert to the great JJ Johnson called “Blue Trombone”, which takes its name from the 1957 album Blue Note.

Friday March 4
Jon Batiste After Party

This show follows Batiste’s performance at the Tucson Jazz Festival at Centennial Hall. Fresh off his eleven Grammy nominations, the multi-talented entertainer is approaching legendary status. The afterparty will feature local jazz musicians until the early hours and will be the place to be after the show.

Friday March 11
Mike Moynihan Quartet plays Sonny Rollins

Mike Moynihan is a prolific composer, songwriter and entertainer. He is the author of hundreds of jazz songs and compositions and has recorded and released over a hundred songs from his various projects. Moynihan will pay homage to the colossus of the saxophone himself, Sonny Rollins.

Friday 18th March
Zazu West hails Django Reinhardt

Founded in 2004, ZAZU West is Arizona’s premier ensemble dedicated to gypsy jazz, the style enshrined in the legacy of guitar legend Django Reinhardt. Whether playing dozens of unique Django compositions, traditional and contemporary jazz standards in the Gypsy Jazz style, or the music of today’s big names in gypsy jazz in Europe and the United States, ZAZU West creates a one-of-a-kind performance experience.

Friday March 25
Rachel Eckroth Trio plays “Money Jungle”

Grammy-nominated pianist Rachel Eckroth brings her trio of bassist Tim Lefebvre and drummer Caleb Michel to the Century Room to perform the highly influential jazz album “Money Jungle.” Released in 1963, this trio of Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus and Max Roach created an album from a particularly tense recording session.

The Century Club is located at 311 E. Congress St. For more information, visit hotelcongress.com or call (520) 622-8848.

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New jazz music for 2022 https://jazzfin.com/new-jazz-music-for-2022/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/new-jazz-music-for-2022/ Who do you think is the best jazz artist making music today? Check out our list of top jazz artists, filled with musicians on the rise in 2022. In many parts of the world, jazz scenes are still in disarray due to ongoing coronavirus restrictions. Even today’s famous jazz musicians have been forced to pivot […]]]>

Who do you think is the best jazz artist making music today? Check out our list of top jazz artists, filled with musicians on the rise in 2022.

In many parts of the world, jazz scenes are still in disarray due to ongoing coronavirus restrictions. Even today’s famous jazz musicians have been forced to pivot and find new ways to maintain their craft.

But, just as the pockets of 2021 brought the return of live music, 2022 is shaping up to be brighter. Jazz artists haven’t let the upset world stop them from collaborating in joyful and unexpected ways.

A highlight of 2021 was the release of Pharoah Sanders’ incredible film promises album with electronic artist Floating Points and the London Symphony Orchestra. Waiting for projects like Emma-Jean Thackray’s album Yellow celebrated the community and unity that often emanates from creating or listening to jazz.

Here are seven new jazz artists pushing the boundaries in 2022.


Jas Kayser

Drummer and composer Jas Kayser, who explores Afrobeat and jazz, has received Jazz FM’s 2021 Act of the Year award. As you might expect, his use of rhythm is extraordinary.

This year, watch how she builds on the success of 2020’s debut EP Unforced rhythm of grace.


Siomha

Irish artist Síomha’s music ranges from jazz to neo-soul to the folk rhythms heard in the single “Spéir Rua”. The singer and guitarist performs her lyrics in English and Irish.

You will want to discover his first album infinite space when it drops in 2022.


lady blackbird

Just press play and let that voice melt over you. Known for its RnB-adjacent releases, the 2021 album Black Acid Soul saw Marley Munroe refocus as Lady Blackbird and fully embrace jazz. In the process, the singer has found a natural groove to fit into, which 2022 should see her continue to explore in a big way.


Waldo’s Gift

Bristol-based trio Waldo’s Gift are explosive live, bringing crowds to life with frenetic yet controlled jazz funk with math rock leanings. The band kicked off 2022 with new release “Flowerbed,” which strays into electronic music territory to haunting effect.


Arooj Aftab

The brutally emotional voice of Brooklyn-based Pakistani musician Arooj Aftab comes from a hallowed place as the accompaniment swings between jazz and traditional South Asian classical music influences.

Aftab from last year Prince Vulture The album was critically acclaimed and she was nominated for the 2022 GRAMMY’s Best Worldwide Musical Performance award.


Unknown questions

Matters Unknown is the exciting project of composer and multi-instrumentalist Jonathan Enser which brings together the best talent from the London jazz scene. The result is a collective that takes musical influences from around the world and creates cosmic free-falling melodies.

Look for new moves in 2022, curated by Jonny between tours as a horn contributor for Nubiyan Twist.


Nala Sinephro

Caribbean-Belgian pedal harpist and composer Nala Sinefro writes and performs captivating experimental ambient jazz.

For the first album Space 1.8 Sinephro has assembled a collection of British musicians, including saxophonist Nubya Garcia, and weaved instruments like a modular synthesizer into the tracks to create something that sparkles with energy. Who will she work with next in 2022 – and where will her designs take her?


Stream your jazz tunes to streaming services around the world with RouteNote. Choose between Free or Premium distribution – either way, retain all rights to your songs and stay firmly in control of your music. Learn more here.

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Birdwatching jazz club opens in Bushwick https://jazzfin.com/birdwatching-jazz-club-opens-in-bushwick/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 14:40:18 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/birdwatching-jazz-club-opens-in-bushwick/ [ad_1] Photo: Maridelis Morales Rosado New York is a city built on its own ghosts. Old places can fade away and be replaced before you even realize they’re gone in the first place. This is how I ended up at the Ornithology Jazz Club, which occupies a shed in Bushwick which was only recently my […]]]>


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Photo: Maridelis Morales Rosado

New York is a city built on its own ghosts. Old places can fade away and be replaced before you even realize they’re gone in the first place. This is how I ended up at the Ornithology Jazz Club, which occupies a shed in Bushwick which was only recently my favorite cocktail bar and the place I originally intended to visit. , Bodeguita.

I gave myself a moment to mourn the passing of my favorite island-themed queer bar, but I was also intrigued. A jazz club in Bushwick – an area best known for its DJs and EDM nights – was unexpected. Inside, the bones of the old bar were still there, and I recognized the bartender from Bodeguita. (A good sign). A grand piano occupied the center of the space while a small group played. I sat at the bar and took a look at the food menu which I was happy to see did not contain any animal products.

On paper, “The Bushwick Vegan Jazz Club” reads like a parody of itself, a Portlandia sketch made manifest. In fact, the space was warm and disarmingly delightful, somewhere where I saw myself spending many nights.

This is undoubtedly due to the experience of the founders of Ornithology, Rie Yamaguchi-Borden and her husband Mitchell Borden. For two decades, the couple have dedicated their lives to creating spaces where jazz musicians can come together while striving to keep those spaces accessible to new audiences. Mitchell founded Smalls in 1994, and the indescribable basement with a $ 10 blanket and alcohol-free quickly became a staple of jazz in the West Village, earning a reputation for nurturing upcoming talent. Fat Cat, its loudest cousin, opened nearby in 2000 and has found more fans. “We’re addicted to the lifestyle,” says Mitchell. “Whenever there is a big show, the people who enjoy it the most are the two of us.”

Rie and Mitchell Borden and their dog Winnie.
Photo: Maridelis Morales Rosado

Mitchell and Rie moved from the West Village to Bushwick when Mitchell retired in 2019, and Rie started playing concerts on Thursday nights at their local bar, which happened to be Bodeguita. When the pandemic struck, the couple saw with their own eyes how the pandemic decimated businesses and robbed musicians of something crucial to their survival: spaces to play. In response, the husband-wife team founded Gotham Yardbird Sanctuary, a nonprofit that coordinates jazz performances throughout the city while ensuring respectable musician rates for the host venues. In December 2020, they started hosting a weekly jam session during Rie’s former Thursday night slot at Bodeguita.

“During the pandemic, I had a lot of time to train, and I thought, It should be the way of life of musicians and artists, explains Rie. “This could be the turning point in establishing a standard of compensation for musicians so that they can live their lives focusing on their art.”

This summer, the owner of Bodeguita approached the Bordens with an offer to sell the space. With no illusions about the harsh landscape of a still recovering city, the Bordens found partners – Mohammed Chrishti, the accountant of Gotham Yardbird Sanctuary, and his friend Ishmael Sierra – and officially opened the Ornithology Jazz Club in October.

A member of the public sips a Space Is the Place cocktail during a jam session.

The jam sessions take place every evening.

Photographs by Maridelis Morales Rosado

The couple’s reputation means that the artists featured are big names in the jazz scene: New Orleans pianist Sullivan Fortner, guitarist Pasquale Grasso and Israeli-American bassist Omer Avital, to name a few. . And musicians aren’t the only creative talent Rie and Mitchell aim to bring to light – they also want to feature a rotating team of chefs to handle the food. “As far as I know how much jazz artists need a place to show their art, so must culinary artists,” says Rie. The menu, like the music, is different every night, providing chefs with a kitchen space where they can try out new dishes. Monday through Thursday, grills and other sandwiches by Matt Clifford take center stage, while Friday and Saturday are typically Anthony James’ creative veggie burgers. Sunday is a rotating chef’s residence, which Rie fills with word of mouth. “I wanted to offer the kitchen as another showcase space, like jazz shows.

Last Sunday, they handed over the cooking reins to Giselle Stamp, a Brooklyn native who runs a Dominican pop-up called Deadbeets. The menu was concentrated: a mashed yuca with garlic as a starter, a Sancocho stew for the main course and a coconut flan to finish. At the end of the night, she was due to come back in two weeks.

Creative control of the cocktail menu is in the hands of Luciano Flor and Layla Kovacevic, who had contact with the Bordens while they were bartenders at Bodeguita, and the approach to the ingredients of the drink, as well as the descriptions. of their menus, is just as eclectic: The Green Dolphin tells the story of a “dead and reborn cucumber in the form of a dolphin swimming in the river of wormwood and mint”; Space Is the Place seems “deep in the egg white cosmos” where “chamomile, lemon, lavender and vanilla find self-awareness”; Deep Purple invites drinkers to “step into a wonderful world where dill, rosemary and pomegranate make love”.

Yuca puree with finely sliced ​​marinated red onion, cilantro and garlic mojo, garnished with “pernil” oyster mushrooms.

Kabocha squash stew with yuca, malanga, green plantain and corn. An all-vegetable menu facilitates composting, which is used for the rooftop herb garden.

Luciano Flor pouring a space is the place.

Layla Kovacevic mixes drinks.

Space Is the Place, Birdland Lullaby, Deep Purple, Summertime and the Green Dolphin,

Photographs by Maridelis Morales Rosado

Rie and Mitchell weren’t sure if a jazz club would be received in Bushwick, but they knew they wanted to keep it accessible to the surrounding community. They do this by avoiding charging for a blanket and offering drinks at $ 10 or $ 12 apiece. It works, says Mitchell, “We opened the doors, people came in and I guess they were hungry. “Every night the club brings in musicians from all over town to play, and every night people come in,” The most exciting thing for me is that I know people hear live jazz for the premiere. times, and I can park in the back. . “

Once the scheduled group is finished, the Ornithology floor opens for a jam session. Any musician in the audience is invited to step in and play, and the sessions run until the end of the music, usually two or three in the morning. (On Thursdays, these sessions are designed to connect young musicians with established artists and to foster a bond between generations.)

For Mitchell and Rie, it feels like a start. “I think there will be more jazz clubs opening in Bushwick,” Mitchell says, comparing this new space to the West Village when he opened Smalls: “On 10th Street you can see three different bands in one night. – if you’ve got the money. ”He hopes Bushwick’s relative affordability allows birding to be guided not by the pursuit of profit but rather by the fire of creative passion.

Photo: Maridelis Morales Rosado


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The Inaugural Jazz Music Awards: Celebrating the Spirit of Jazz is scheduled for October 2022 https://jazzfin.com/the-inaugural-jazz-music-awards-celebrating-the-spirit-of-jazz-is-scheduled-for-october-2022/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/the-inaugural-jazz-music-awards-celebrating-the-spirit-of-jazz-is-scheduled-for-october-2022/ [ad_1] Wendy Williams, Managing Director of Jazz 91.9 WCLK (Photo credit: Lenna Davis from Lenna Davis Photography) * The inauguration Jazz Music Awards: Celebrating the Spirit of Jazz announced its awards ceremony, scheduled for Saturday 22 October 2022, to Cobb Energy Performing Arts Center in the subway in Atlanta, Georgia. For five decades, the venue […]]]>


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Wendy Williams, Managing Director of Jazz 91.9 WCLK (Photo credit: Lenna Davis from Lenna Davis Photography)

* The inauguration Jazz Music Awards: Celebrating the Spirit of Jazz announced its awards ceremony, scheduled for Saturday 22 October 2022, to Cobb Energy Performing Arts Center in the subway in Atlanta, Georgia. For five decades, the venue has hosted Broadway shows, ballets, concerts, operas and more.

Presented by Jazz 91.9 WCLK, a public radio station licensed at Clark University in Atlanta and known as “Atlanta’s Jazz Station,” the Jazz Music Awards (JMA) will be a dynamic presentation that recognizes the iconic spirit of jazz by shining the spotlight on mainstream and contemporary jazz musicians who continue to make a mark on music and the industry. Hosts, artists, presenters and special award winners will be announced at a later date.

The Jazz Music Awards will recognize a wide range of creators from the national and international jazz world, from traditional and contemporary musicians, singers and major groups, to composers, to individual songs and to complete albums. The eligibility period for the 2022 Awards Ceremony begins from April 1, 2021 to March 31, 2022. Online submissions will begin on New Years Day, Saturday January 1, 2022, through Thursday, March 31, 2022. Categories of prices are as follows: Best Mainstream Artist, Best Contemporary Artist, Best Duo, Group or Big Band, Best New Jazz Artist (contemporary or general public), Best Jazz Singer, Bis an International Artist (contemporary or general public), Best Mainstream Album, Best Contemporary Album, Jazz innovator of the year, Composer of the Year, Educator of the Year, Jazz Legacy Award, and Song of the year (Fan vote).

“In the 47 years that WCLK has been on the air, we have performed and specialized in all genres of jazz,” says Wendy williams, Managing Director of WCLK, who has been at the helm for 27 years. We play mainstream, contemporary, fusion, direct and modern jazz. We have gone through the whole range. This is the history of the resort and quite frankly, the secret of our success. We are still standing. And for over fifteen years, we have supplemented our show with the presentation of live jazz concerts, which have helped support the operations of our NPR member nonprofit public radio station. We’ve always enjoyed the sold-out crowds and the joy listeners feel when they see us at concerts.

MORE NEWS ON EURWEB: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar’s son to spend 180 days in jail for stabbing neighbor

Rushion McDonald, Founder of 3815 Media (Photo courtesy of WCLK Radio)

Williams and David Linton, station’s program director and former record company director, contacted Rushion McDonald, the founder of 3815 Media, who will lead production on the next Starry Celebration. A two-time Emmy Award-winning executive producer and three-time NAACP Image Award winner, McDonald is the host of the popular “Money Making Conversations” podcast. 3815 Media will produce the Jazz Music Awards and its red carpet event with plans to launch a live TV show worldwide.

McDonald’s is the architect behind the production of multimedia platforms for major clients, including Steve Harvey’s career and the blockbuster Hoodie Awards, later renamed Neighborhood Awards. Her extensive work as a writer and producer also includes collaborations with other famous talents such as Kevin Hart, Taraji P. Henson, Gabrielle Union, Mo’Nique, Tia and Tamara Mowry, Stephen A. Smith, Jamie Foxx and others from New York. City in Hollywood. He has also created national media campaigns for State Farm, Ford, JC Penny, General Mills, iHeart Radio, Radio One, NBC, BET and ABC networks, to name a few. For more information on Rushion McDonald, visit rushionmcdonald.com.

Jazz 91.9 WCLK Program Director David C Linton (Photo credit: Reginald Duncan of Cranium Creation)

Linton says, “This is an exciting time in the 47 year history of Jazz 91.9 WCLK. I worked with this station as a label manager and I know how pivotal this has been in the careers of so many artists, especially jazz artists, and it still is today. When Wendy told me about returning to the station as Program Director in 2018, I was thrilled. Now to have the opportunity to help write another chapter in WCLK history is an honor. Now is the time for the Jazz Music Awards and WCLK is well positioned to present this long overdue awards show. It will be a historic and momentous event for all those who love jazz. “

Three-time Grammy Award winner and NEA Jazz Master Terri Lyne Carrington (Photo credit: Delphine Diallo)

The Jazz Music Awards committee was awarded a three-time Grammy Award-winning recording artist and NEA Jazz Master, Terri Lyne Carrington, who will lead the musical direction and act as a consultant for the first-ever awards ceremony. With his technical magic and deep creativity, Carrington has become one of the giants of jazz music today. A multi-talented drummer, songwriter, producer and educator, Carrington began her professional career at age ten and received a full scholarship from Berklee College of Music at age eleven. Her artistry and commitment to education have earned her honorary doctorates from the Manhattan School of Music and Berklee College of Music, where she is currently the Founder and Artistic Director of the Berklee Institute of Jazz and Gender Justice.

To date, she has released eight career albums. She is the first female artist to win the Grammy Award for best jazz instrumental album, which she received for her 2013 project, Money Jungle: Provocative in blue. Since starting her career, she has worked as a popular musician in New York City and then moved to Los Angeles, where she was recognized on late night television as the house drummer for “The Arsenio Hall. Show “and Quincy Jones. ‘VIBE TV’ program, hosted by Sinbad. To date, Carrington has performed on over a hundred recordings and has been a model and advocate for young women and men internationally through her teaching and touring careers. She has worked extensively with jazz giants and legends including Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, Al Jarreau, Stan Getz, Woody Shaw, Clark Terry, Cassandra Wilson, Dianne Reeves, James Moody, Joe Sample, Esperanza Spalding, and more. . For more information on Terri Lyne Carrington, visit terrilynecarrington.com.

“There is so much excitement and anticipation around the Jazz Music Awards,” said Williams. “I have always known that Terri Lyne is an incredible talent and a very accomplished drummer, composer and educator. The more I remove the layers, I am fascinated that she has covered so much territory in her career. She is also a much sought-after Music Director for prestigious large-scale jazz and musical productions around the world. And we all know she’s performed with and directed some of the best and that’s why she’s perfect for our inaugural awards show.

As a presenter of live jazz shows over the years, sold out at some of Atlanta’s biggest concert halls and hosting annual benefit shows, WCLK began presenting artists with its Jazz Legacy. Award. In recent years, Williams has noticed, as he travels the musical landscape, that there is a dearth of large award ceremonies honoring the creativity and work of one of the earliest forms of indigenous musical art in America: jazz. Much like Williams, the Linton program director, and her team began to think about hosting a bigger celebration of jazz, COVID-19 has put all performances on hiatus. “These musicians were sidelined for a year and a half, and the audience missed something,” she says. “I felt we should come back big. “

Additionally, Williams says, the event will include an educational component on the Clark University Atlanta campus, as well as a black-tie awards gala at the Cobb Center on Friday, October 21, 2022, the day before the awards ceremony. prices. Friday’s program will feature interactive sessions from world-renowned experts in the field of jazz, and classes will also include small-group workshops led by leading creators from the music and performing arts industries for students. high school and college students as well as the public.

“Participants will be able to learn and glean something that is happening in the jazz music industry from some of the best,” says Williams. “So we want to make it a stimulating and spectacular weekend that uplifts and promotes this music. “As soon as COVID was lifted, you saw artists on the road again and jazz festivals were back. Now, it’s a collective way to have them all on one stage loved, to be celebrated the same way we see it at other music awards shows. We need to.

For more information and updates on the Jazz Music Awards and Jazz 91.9 WCLK, visit: wclk.com.

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reopening of clubs and novelties https://jazzfin.com/reopening-of-clubs-and-novelties/ https://jazzfin.com/reopening-of-clubs-and-novelties/#respond Sat, 30 Oct 2021 03:19:23 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/reopening-of-clubs-and-novelties/ [ad_1] Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Reddit E-mail To print . Reopens of jazz clubs, birthdays of jazz artists, and new jazz releases provide plenty of reasons to celebrate and enjoy the month of October. Jazz clubs have been hit the hardest of any concert hall during the pandemic, and the hope is the worst is over, […]]]>


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Reopens of jazz clubs, birthdays of jazz artists, and new jazz releases provide plenty of reasons to celebrate and enjoy the month of October.

Jazz clubs have been hit the hardest of any concert hall during the pandemic, and the hope is the worst is over, Avery Kleinman noted in a recent Washington Post article. He pointed out that over the summer some clubs in the United States started to reopen and that many musicians were and still are eager to get back on stage.

This is certainly the case here and abroad. It was only recently that a growing list of musicians released tour dates in the US and overseas that are quite extensive.

Kleinman’s article states, “The closures are part of a decades-long trend exacerbated by the pandemic. Although many have triumphantly reopened their doors in recent weeks and months, jazz clubs have been hit the hardest of all types of concert halls, according to Audrey Fix Schaefer, communications manager at the National Independent. Venue Association. The group was created during the pandemic to defend sites that languished for months with no income. “

“Keep in mind that jazz clubs are probably the most vulnerable to start with,” Schaefer said. “They operate on very thin margins. They are art houses. If you are going to open a blues club or a jazz club, it is because you are dedicated to this art and you love it. It’s not because you’re an entrepreneur looking to make a lot of money, ”Schaefer said.

The Dakota Club, which offers jazz in downtown Minneapolis, reopened in September. The Preservation Hall in New Orleans reopened in June. The Jazz Standard in New York and Blue Whale in Los Angeles are two popular jazz venues that unfortunately remain closed.

In addition to celebrating the reopening of many jazz clubs, including the iconic Village Vanguard and the famous Birdland in New York City, October is also a time to celebrate birthdays.

Courtesy of jazzdepot.com

Celebrate their life, their heritage and their music

October jazz musicians celebrating birthdays include the late trumpeter Roy Hargrove, who would have turned 52 on October 16. Another great trumpeter, Wynton Marsalis, celebrated a milestone birthday when he was 60 on October 18.

The legendary Jelly Roll Morton, who proclaimed himself the inventor of jazz, celebrated a birthday on October 20.

Jazz fans are thrilled with the release of “A Love Supreme: Live in Seattle” by John Coltrane. The recordings of Coltrane’s 1965 live ensemble with “A Love Supreme” have remained in the basement of Seattle conductor Joe Brazil for years. Now a full album will be released on October 22 on Impulse! label.

This is important news because “A Love Supreme” is one of the most beloved music albums in jazz. The four-part suite features musicians including Coltrane’s rhythm section: Elvin Jones on drums, McCoy Tyner on piano, Jimmy Garrison on bass, as well as tenor saxophonist Pharoah Sanders, a second bass player, Donald “Rafael” Garrett and alto saxophonist Carlos Salle.

Speaking of rare live recordings, High Note saxophonist Houston Person’s new album “Live in Paris” (The City of Love) is the real deal. It presents Houston on tenor saxophone in a moving and fine form and a first-class rhythm section that includes Ben Paterson on the B3 organ, Peter Bernstein on guitar and Willie Jones III on drums. The album was released on September 24.

The live recording took place during Person’s appearance at the Festival Jazz à la Villette in 2019. “I just play great music,” said Houston. “I’m looking for a nice melody and nice lyrics.” This is the 86-year-old’s first live recording in a while.

Among the stellar and stylish tracks on the album are “The Way We Were”, “Since I Fell for You” and “Sunny”.

Guitarist and singer Lionel Loueke’s new album “Close Your Eyes” (Soundscore Records) was released on October 22 and stars bassist Reuben Rodgers and drummer Eric Harland. It is his first standards record and was originally a vinyl exclusive on Newvelle Records in 2018. It is now available on streaming services and on CD or for download through iTunes and Band Camp.


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DJANGO FESTIVAL ALLSTARS ‘JOY TOUR’, at Birdland Jazz Club https://jazzfin.com/django-festival-allstars-joy-tour-at-birdland-jazz-club/ https://jazzfin.com/django-festival-allstars-joy-tour-at-birdland-jazz-club/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 19:50:19 +0000 https://jazzfin.com/django-festival-allstars-joy-tour-at-birdland-jazz-club/ [ad_1] There’s nothing like The Django Festival Allstars to bring pure JOY to an audience, and that’s exactly what we need now after having been through a difficult year and a half. Their music directly reaches your heart and brings mile-long ‘smiles’, as the music is ‘happy’, contagious and full of love. “HOT GYPSY JAZZ” […]]]>


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There’s nothing like The Django Festival Allstars to bring pure JOY to an audience, and that’s exactly what we need now after having been through a difficult year and a half. Their music directly reaches your heart and brings mile-long ‘smiles’, as the music is ‘happy’, contagious and full of love. “HOT GYPSY JAZZ” and the Django Reinhardt NY Festival is the place to be.

“The best show in town”. … Will Friedwald, The Wall Street Journal

Django’s unique and cool joie de vivre has made him an icon for an unlikely lineup of luminaries, from Carlos Santana to guitar greats, Eric Clapton! Jimi Hendrix named his “big band of gypsies” as a tribute, and Willie Nelson adopted his influence in “country swing”.

The Django Festival Allstars is a brilliantly cohesive group of star musicians who have taken America by storm, performing in top venues and festivals to standing ovations. Birdland is where it all began. It is one of the oldest events of the legendary Birdland, held twice a year.

The festival is produced by Pat Philips, co-founded by Ettore Stratta and Pat Philips

To visit:

Oct.

26-30: Birdland,

31: Townecrier, Beacon NY,

Nov.

4: Keystone Korner, Baltimore,

5: James Moody Festival, Chase Room, NJPAC,

6: Perelman Theater, Kimmel Ctr for Performing Arts, Pennsylvania,

7: Armenian Church, Wayne NJ,

11: Jazz Albuquerque Outpost,

12: Musical Instrument Museum, Phoenix,

13: Taos Jazz Bebop Society Festival,

15 and 16: Denver Dazzle,

18: Arts Center, Grass Valley, California,

19: Blue Note Jazz, Napa,

21: Torrance Cultural Arts Center, Torrrance, CA, 22: Kuumbwa Jazz, Santa Cruz, CA

Music dates back to the 1930s and 1940s in Europe, where Django Reinhardt was “king” and teamed up with top jazz violinist Stéphane Grappelli to create music history.

The Django Festival All-Stars bring ‘HOT JAZZ’ to today. The Django Reinhardt Festival invites the best jazz artists to join them, which brings an extra spark of creativity and joy to the performance. They are swinging like crazy and will break your heart with a ballad, bringing down the house. Some are gypsies from Lorraine where music and family reign supreme, and where the art of music is taught from generation to generation.

“The highlight of Saturday and arguably the entire Playboy Festival was provided by The Django Festival Allstars” Scott Yanow, Jazz Scene LA ….

WELCOME TO BIRDLAND! 315 West 44th Street,
SHOWS: 7:30 am AND 9:30 am,
Dinner menu and parking nearby.
Reservations: 212 581-3080 or www.birdlandjazz.com

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